Thom Spanos

North Tonawanda, NY, United States

About Thom

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I'm passionate about

Learning about the world and finding new ways to use technology to improve quality of life.

Comments & conversations

Noface
Thom Spanos
Posted 5 months ago
If the cure for mortality is found within your lifetime, would you go for it and become immortal?
I am a little confused by your argument for a couple of reasons. First, you draw a correlation between birth and death both being a part of life, but it might be a bit more helpful if you explained what you mean. The way I see it, birth is simply a location-based change during the course of our natural development where we move from inside the mother's body to the outside world. However, this is simply a part of the natural processes which allow us to be alive, using our senses and doing things, whereas death by any means is the complete breakdown of those processes. The point of achieving immortality is to maintain or supplement those natural processes so that they don't stop (i.e. cause us to die), allowing people to continue living (sensing and acting) throughout the world. Secondly, if you were able to achieve immortality, the presupposition here is that your son could as well, so you would not need to experience such an unfortunate turn of events. Lastly, you say that you "want all memories of past erased so that we all are perfectly ageless," if people were immortal, but then you say you are "unwilling to embrace such an immortal existence." Could you explain because I am having trouble understanding and these statements seem contradictory to me.
Noface
Thom Spanos
Posted 5 months ago
How can we increase the effectiveness of Environmental Law?
The lack of political willpower to increase costs in the short term (such as by raising environmental standards without 'grandfathering' in existing violations) is one of the biggest issues. Unfortunately, we're more concerned with avoiding shocks to the economic systems in place than we are to actually solving the problem of climate change or avoiding environmental disasters. To make environmental laws more effective, we need to get rid of the loopholes in the economic system which create externalities. For example, by holding companies responsible for the costs of recycling their products AFTER a consumer is done using them, and charging companies extra for non-recyclable products, we could bring the cost of recouping those resources into the equation. This would allow the market to do what it does best, find a solution that would make recycling more effective and less costly. However, if we simply don't account for this, we will end up farming our disposal sites for resources later on. We need to analyse the incentives for both businesses and consumers to identify ways to make people want sustainable products instead.
Noface
Thom Spanos
Posted 5 months ago
If the cure for mortality is found within your lifetime, would you go for it and become immortal?
I understand that some people may disagree, but I believe that immortality is essentially what life is striving for through the process of natural selection, we simply happen to be quite bad at it. Whenever an organism mutates around an obstacle that would normally weaken/kill one of its species, it has simply trumped death that normally might have occurred. Continuing with this, the further generations of the organism will continue to be better and better at 'living.' Unfortunately, we are constrained by the natural limitations of this process (i.e. the determination of natural selection is only made at the moment of passing on one's genes to the next generation). However, I don't believe that should change our natural inclination to work to overcome the causes of death. We have reached a point of self-determination via our ability to think critically and problem-solve whereby we can work beyond those natural limitations. It is up to us to make that effort, however, and we need the willpower to do so. I personally would be glad to achieve immortality because I think that it would increase the rate of scientific discovery. Great thinkers would be able to pursue their passions without their work being left for others who have to spend so much time catching up. To the individual who stated that Hitler would still be around, I can only say: especially in a society with immortality, any death would be an atrocity. If only we could strive for such a view regardless.