Noel Gorden

Summerland Key, FL, United States

About Noel

Bio

Born: Glendale, Calif. 7-31-1952. Ages 3-11 lived outside of Chicago. Have lived in Pa., NYC, Arkansas, N. Mn. N. & S. Ca., Fla. did very well in school, English major, international affairs minor (FSU), studied in Firenze, Italy, San Jose, Costa Rica. Fluent in Spanish, sign language, survival Italian. Have worked in real estate, appraising, car dealership, tutoring, private teaching, and more.

Areas of Expertise

Research

An idea worth spreading

Beliefs are not facts - stand up for pregnant women, elders, handicapped, not ideas that we CHOOSE to believe in. Get even with everyone who has helped you or anyone else. Life is a banquet.

I'm passionate about

Learning, travel, giving/sharing, miracles, spiritual things.

Comments & conversations

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Noel Gorden
Posted 11 months ago
Fight or Flight: How do we know?
Who can speak for another? If you know yourself, you know how you would react. I think that most people have altruistic leanings. But I I know that people see what they are looking for, and I see others doing good all the time without any apparent personal gain. Like the man who stopped on probably the most dangerous stretch of highway in Florida to hhold my hand after he saw my vehicle roll over into the mangrove. I was hanging upside down at the time because my seatbelt was latched, but he stayed with me until police and ambulance came. He did not get much recognition, no social reward to my knowledge. Is that what you consider altruism?
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Noel Gorden
Posted 11 months ago
Fight or Flight: How do we know?
Yes. I was 12-13 when Kitty was murdered, and remember it well. I just could not believe that none of those people did anything. Like every dog that I have known, I would begin by barking - as loud and as much as I could. While screaming threats and epithets, I would grab a phone and dial 911. If anyone was with me, I would have that person talk to the police while I shouted and threw things. In the heat of the moment I generally trust myself. My reactions are good and I trust my impulses, although I did once get a bloody nose trying to stop a fight. I cannot say if this has to do with altruism or just a sense of right and wrong. Nor can I speak for we, but when I see something that is clearly wrong I will speak up. Yes, there are gray areas where no one is being physically hurt, but maybe someone is shoplifting. I would not try to judge a stranger -I do not know if it is mine to interfere,but if it was food or drink, I would probably try to pay for it, perhaps even claim that I had once accidentally left the store without paying for one of those and was therefore only trying to make it right. Then it is up to the clerk or attendant. I wish someone could tell me how a person could not excuse not at least calling police if someone was being attacked.
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Noel Gorden
Posted 11 months ago
Why is no one talking about spinal cord injuries? Why do we who have them get so ignored?
Thank you very much, Morton. I am certain that Gregoire Courtine is doing wonderful and important research. I also believe in the power of "anecdotal" information (as doctors call it). If someone else has done something, maybe I can as well. If no one else has done it, or has reporting that they have, maybe I can do it. Hope must be eternal And encouraged. If I can do it at 61, what can a 15 or 20 or 30 year old person do?
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Noel Gorden
Posted 11 months ago
Why is no one talking about spinal cord injuries? Why do we who have them get so ignored?
Thank you, Colleen. When I was a child, a neighbor & friend's mother was in a car accident and lost half of her brain. She was sent home to die - doctor's in the 1950s did not give her hope either. she taught herself to talk & to walk again. She did not even have a plate in her head for cosmetic or health & safety reasons. My mom was the only woman in the neighborhood who associated with her. She would send me over to her house to walk her over to our house, and I would sit with them while they had coffee and talked. Lacey spoke painfully slowly, yet she was smart, aware, and fully cognizant of her appearance, speech deficits, and need for companionship and communication. My mother showed me by her example how to love and care for people and help them to heal. Lacey and my mom were very special people. I do not feel ignored, but I deeply appreciate your caring response. Perhaps you could start a conversation about your experience and together we could encourage people to not ask or expect their doctor to have all the answers, to accept personal responsibility for their own healing and for that of others who find them. I truly believe that on some level I chose to be an example for others to make a contribution to healing. I think that most people would like to give to others in the world. All have stories to share and so much more. Not all of us can write books or plays or songs to tell others, or perform music or comedy or whatever. We have TED, and what a blessing! Your story is important, interesting and valuable. Please share it with as many people as you can.
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Noel Gorden
Posted 11 months ago
Why is no one talking about spinal cord injuries? Why do we who have them get so ignored?
I should have qualified my opening statement with the word "human.". Rats, expensive technology, and drug cocktails are not for me. I have done so much healing on my own, but first I had to divest myself of most of what doctors have told me - they have not been encouraging nor offered hope. What I have done for myself has been from cleaning up my diet, finding do-able exercise (in my salt water canal, mostly, then dancing alone and walking), using quality organic herbs and treating food as medicine. Positive thinking, spirituality, and intestinal cleaning are also important factors. I know that most Americans do not want to give up fast food, meat, sugary foods but are they really more valuable than health?
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Noel Gorden
Posted 11 months ago
Is it part of human nature to have a hierarchy?
In any field of human endeavor, there will be leaders and innovators,. One person simply cannot lead a lage group alone. Even in absolute monarchy, there seem to be groups of advisors, administrators, and grunts. In today's world of extreme specialization, a brain surgeon (for example) will consult with other brain surgeons before attempting new or controversial surgery. A rocket scientist will consult with colleagues; children playing in groups decide games by consensus and agree to take turns. The leader in any group is rarely a despot, but usually the one best at eliciting information and creating consensus. Thus it seems to me that there is never just one leader but nearly always one dominant voice in the group that articulates a the shared common goals.although the majority will generally prefer group consensus, there will always be outliers, as in statistics. There will always be the so-called individualists: those most comfortable being their own boss, finding their own way and thereby sometimes changing the direction of the whole group. Some of us just have to be our own boss, blaze our own trail,find new ingredients to put into old recipes and thereby create or stimulate CHANE or innovation.