Andrew Kewley

Adelaide, Australia

About Andrew

An idea worth spreading

Too numerous to list. The problem with most of my ideas is they are all large scale - they require large scale participation and lots of work to get off the ground which can make startups difficult.

I'm passionate about

Science - all fields.

Comments & conversations

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Andrew Kewley
Posted almost 4 years ago
How are we going to get out of debt?
In principle, the same way as any other investment - growth in net income outstripping the interest repayments. In practise, we have to ask is this possible? What level of long term growth is realistic? While in principle there is no immediate shortage of energy available, there is certainly going to be major scarcity in the resources we currently use the most, such as oil. As a previous commenter said, a simple solution is simply to consume less - aka living below your means. (This principle can be applied on all scales, from the individual to the national government level). But this is easier said than done. It is difficult to change all our habits at once, but if we start now, making all the small changes we can and finding solutions to the larger challenges then we can certainly turn things around in our lifetimes.
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Andrew Kewley
Posted almost 4 years ago
Eve Ensler: Suddenly, my body
Those of us who have had to suffer abuse or chronic illness (and for many of us there is no cure), all respond in our own individual ways. But few of us have a significant voice, few in our society actually take the time to listen. The passion in this talk is directed towards giving all those bodies a voice.
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Andrew Kewley
Posted over 4 years ago
Seth Priebatsch: The game layer on top of the world
The strength in gaming is due to the well defined rewards. Put in the work and you get the reward. Whereas the real world is much more predictable. The real point should be not so much "making the world gamelike" but attempt to re-design our systems of incentives and rewards in a way that is more comprehensible, predictable and therefore psychologically rewarding. Especially in this increasingly chaotic world where bankers can make huge incomes while screwing the economy, while others die of disease due to factors beyond their control. This tends to completely scatter our conceptions of reward. I agree with previous commenters, that simplistic progress bars and status indicators are very short term and are unlikely to produce long term benefit. I'm not sure if the young man giving the talk understands this.
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Andrew Kewley
Posted about 5 years ago
Craig Venter: Watch me unveil "synthetic life"
This itself is a small step, but this sort of technology will open the floodgates with regards to synthetically designed genomes and ultimately the technology to design a bacterial genome from scratch. For better or worse of course...
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Andrew Kewley
Posted about 5 years ago
Louise Fresco: We need to feed the whole world
No doubt that mass production of food is necessary to maintain our high population densities. But this is just a means to an end, rather than an ideal to exalt. The problem is that a one-size fits all approach to food production - bread production with various additives is far from the ideal. Food intolerances/sensitivities/allergies are surprisingly common, especially for major staples such as wheat and milk. Instead of relying on flawed 20th century one-size-fits-all agricultural systems, we should instead be taking advantage of our technology, not just to move towards both more sustainable agricultural methods. But also diets that more actively consider both physiological needs in general, but also physiological differences and taste preferences between individuals. This is the next step we need to take to further reduce the incidence of many diseases. Considering scale is important, but not the necessarily the most important thing we need to consider.
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Andrew Kewley
Posted about 5 years ago
Michael Specter: The danger of science denial
Further, with regards to ideas of falling vaccination rates, the speaker doesn't seem to have studied the facts. The concept of herd immunity for example. The fact that a few individuals don't get measles vaccines doesn't make it any more likely for others who aren't immunised to contract the disease. Vaccinations do have real quantified risks, those of us who actually read scientific articles know this. Secondly, given the small risk of getting measles in the USA for example and the risk of complications vs the risk of complications of the vaccine, the results are actually in favour of not getting certain vaccines, at least for the individual. Another example is the reported rate of serious reactions to the HPV vaccine (an example of a new high quality vaccine), vs the annual rate of cervical cancer diagnoses attributed to the virus. Both are in the same ballpark! But the benefit (currently) is still to have the vaccine, since the rate of cancer diagnosis compounds.