Goran Kimovski

Senior Technology Consultant, OperatingDev.com
Vancouver Bc, Canada

About Goran

Languages

English, Macedonian, Serbian

TED Conference

TEDActive 2012

Areas of Expertise

Agile/Lean Coaching, Technical Project Leadership, Software Development Process, Software Product Architecture, Continuous Integration & Deployment, Cloud Computing, Cloud Migration, Business Intelligence (BI)

An idea worth spreading

I am dedicated to my vision of building a mentoring platform for youth to experience authentic learning and to work alongside passionate adults in learning lifelong skills. This is the reason why I founded World4Children, a not-for-profit dedicated to building such platform and took on the challenge to run TEDxKids@BC.

My dream is to see TED bring more youth into the global platform by inviting more speakers of younger ages, creating/building a global community of people eager/willing to support youth who are passionate about the same forces as adult attendees: powerful ideas, inderdisciplinary thought, innovation, etc.

I hope to see youth as part of many more initiatives like TEDFellows, TED Prize and maybe even a specific initiative designed to bridge the gap between youth and adult communities and invite mentorship and collaboration across the generations.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted over 4 years ago
What is the true value (if any) of organized schooling?
I friend of mine just shared this with me: http://www.slate.com/id/2288402 (Why Preschool Shouldn't Be Like School -- New research shows that teaching kids more and more, at ever-younger ages, may backfire.) I'd like to share few excerpts here as they're highly relevant to this discussion: "Direct instruction really can limit young children's learning. Teaching is a very effective way to get children to learn something specific. But it also makes children less likely to discover unexpected information and to draw unexpected conclusions." "That means, it's more important than ever to give children's remarkable, spontaneous learning abilities free rein. That means a rich, stable, and safe world, with affectionate and supportive grown-ups, and lots of opportunities for exploration and play. Not school for babies."
179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted over 4 years ago
What is the true value (if any) of organized schooling?
I find this applicable to so many other subjects! While I can see how it would be hard to run some chemistry experiments outside the classroom, I still remember how some of my early exposure to it made me interested to learn more -- I still like to put bread in my mouth and chew it for a long time, resisting the urge to swallow, so I can get the sweetness that comes as sugars get formed by the chemical reactions in the mouth ;-) Overcoming the false environment problem and extending the learning outside the classroom is a major issue that requires involvement from the students, the parents, the community really. For example, to keep presence of French in our home (and we're already bi-lingual with English and Macedonian) we're turning the language into one we use to play. With a bit of an effort on my side, I am trying to remember few words and learn few sentences myself and then challenge my daughter to teach me more by playing guessing or matching games. This past weekend we did a pretend game calling some girl from Paris on the "phone" and my daughter spent 3-4 minutes talking in French with her in an unscripted conversation -- it turned out the girl was poor and we needed to make some cloths for her, but the materials were on a different planet ;-) I'd love to hear more ideas how to keep the experience in the schools spill out of its walls. Rather than turning to homeschooling, I would like to help schools reinvent themselves so they can offer rich learning experiences and become environments where the authentic self is appreciated and the learning is the goal! END ... (3 of 3)
179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted over 4 years ago
What is the true value (if any) of organized schooling?
While I understand the "environment to learn and experience" aspect -- which is where my idea of merging community centers and schools and turning them into learning hubs is focusing too -- I find that the opportunity to learn skills like learning to follow directions or socializing with adults can be found elsewhere too and is not unique to schools. As a matter of fact, in a rural environment or the traditional indigenous cultures, these skills are acquired without any plan or curriculum as the nature of the interactions in those societies provides for daily opportunities to learn those skills. One thing that is offered by learning environments that work and seem to be lacking from the school setting is the opportunity for the learner to immerse in the experience. As long as the kids are split by age and the curriculum controlled by the teacher or some far removed bureaucracy, the schools will only provide false sense of immersiveness -- as one French teacher described to me the environment inside the French Immersion schools here in Canada. (sadly, my own daughter is in one such environment, which is a point of pain for me, but that is a different story!) What the teacher meant by the false environment is that in her classroom, she is the only one that is constantly using French and is motivated (or at least incentivized) to keep on doing that as a way to offer the experience to the kids. The kids find it very easy to slip back to English, since once they're outside the classroom, they have no reason to keep speaking French. CONTINUES ... (2 or 3)
179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted over 4 years ago
What is the true value (if any) of organized schooling?
I am overwhelmed by all the responses and I would like to thank everyone for contributing their thoughts so far! I find this topic of immense importance not just to me but to every parent and educator I had a chance to talk with as I am working to organize TEDxKids@BC. Understanding the value of schooling and education is one of the goals for the conference as we're trying to bring speakers together that have experienced learning in various ways and are applying their passion and skills in doing inspiring work or pushing forward some amazing ideas. The three things we all try to understand are: - What makes us the authentic selves we all seem to show when not inhibited by social pressures or need to comply? - Do we become those authentic selves as we grow up or we've always had them with us and what we really learn is when to be someone else? - If the current schooling system teaches us how to comply and keep the authentic selves in a hidden place, can schooling and education ever be positive forces that nurture our propensity to be curious about the world, wishing to discover it for ourselves, create new value through our passions, and maybe even change it!? I agree with many of the comments why the current system doesn't provide enough value or on the contrary does more damage instead. However, my interest is not in finding the flaws, but finding if the concept of "learning in an institution whose goal is teaching" has any value in it at all. One underlying theme I can see bubbling up from many comments is that schools provide an environment where the kids can learn and experience stuff they ordinarily have no chance to in other places. Some of the learnings called out seem to include how to follow directions, meet deadlines, work in groups. On top, some of you suggested that we need schools for the socialization aspect, in particular the opportunity to interact with adults outside the family circle. CONTINUES ... (1 of 3)
179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted over 4 years ago
What is the true value (if any) of organized schooling?
I'll start by answering my own question first ;-) I think the value of schooling is in its potential to redefine the institution into a community hub bristling with activities where anyone, not just kids of a certain age, can come and have fun, learn, connect! Hubs like these already exist here in Canada and I believe many other places too -- they're called Community Centres. These are places I go with my family to learn ice skating together, have fun swimming with my kids on a rainy day, provide my daughter with an ability to learn how to play a guitar for an affordable cost, connect with my friends as we're waiting in the hall while our daughters have fun in a rhythmic gymnastic class... It saddens me that we make almost no use of the school -- with exception of the playground -- outside the school hours! If schools and community centres merge, I believe there is much that will change by itself for how schooling works. From bell schedule, to age grouping, to subject silos, none of those would work in an activity hub. Teachers, students, parents, the community, they will all have an active role in the kids (and everyone else's) education. What do you think?
179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted almost 5 years ago
Chris Anderson: How web video powers global innovation
Great talk Chris! Congrats on surviving the first day of online presence ;-) TED has given me a lot of inspiration for some of the articles I am writing on my blog and your talk resonates with my last two articles around engaging in a participatory world (http://mybin.wordpress.com). I realize this kind of world is only possible with the technology we have today, but I am trying to explore the human aspect, i.e. how this new world affects the lives of people embedded in it. Your talk about online video adding a missing layer in the communication -- face-to-face interaction -- made me think if the next step for technology is to become this invisible thing that lets humanity shine through as opposed to replacing it with CGI/avatars? Btw, I'm passionate about bringing kids into this participatory world as partners in change and started a Twitter campaign to get people behind the idea of a @TEDChildren conference in that spirit. What would it take for TED to embrace this idea? ;-)
179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted almost 5 years ago
Adora Svitak: What adults can learn from kids
Thx for pointing to TEDxYouth. I am passionate about the future of our kids and afraid that our society is leaving them aside as we're discussing how to shape their future, so I was encouraged with your reply! It seems though that TEDxYouth serves a different purpose than what I am proposing with TEDChildren. TEDxYouth seems to offer a chance to youth speakers to present their views to other youths attending the events. I see TEDChildren as a global event, much closer to TED, TEDWomen, TEDGlobal, etc. where children and adults together would present and discuss ideas around some of the problems kids face in the world today as well as offer opportunities for kids to partner with researchers, activists, policy-makers in finding solutions for problems putting the kids' future at risk. TEDxYouth could then build on those ideas within their local communities! I am convinced TED has greater power to make such partnership possible than some other attempts like UNICEF's J8 summit!
179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted almost 5 years ago
Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education
It seems that Sugata Mitra proved that when left to their own devices, with no guidance, humans are capable of not only creating a new language (see Pinker's The Language Instinct) or even a culture (see Fox's Talking Hands) from scratch, but they can acquire new knowledge in pretty much the same way -- looks almost as if learning is a cultural phenomenon. It seems that the technology speeds the process, allowing Sugata and other researches to monitor it! Maybe technology can be used to find a way to test certain nature vs. nurture assumptions about human personality development and behavior. Judith Rich Harris (The Nurture Assumption) has put together a promising group socialization theory that is as yet untested to my knowledge, even though it shattered some cherished believes among the parental advisers. Sugata's method shows some behaviors I could predict from the theory. I wonder if using technology seems makes the group identity salient and promotes adaptive social behavior?
179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted almost 5 years ago
Adora Svitak: What adults can learn from kids
I would go one step forward -- not only give the students an ability to be a teacher assistant, but let them be the teacher for a day! I truly believe we need to involve more kids, especially the likes of Adora Svitak, Severn Suzuki, etc. into some of the important discussions we are having about both global problems as humanity, but also local issues in our communities. In http://wp.me/pfN0i-7d I am calling for an action to organize a TEDChildren conference (akin to TEDWomen) to pave the way in bringing the children in discussing ideas that will shape their own future. To gather followers and get TED to embrace the idea I created a Twitter account @TEDChildren. If we get enough people to support the initiative, we can get a chance to involve the kids in making some of the policies that may impact their future. I think that is really exciting! If you like the idea and want to support it please follow @TEDChildren, tell your network, and send your ideas about the conference!
179971
Goran Kimovski
Posted about 5 years ago
Kirk Citron: And now, the real news
I would specifically add that understanding human biology and personality in particular is a critical area that would matter a lot in the long run alongside the others Kirk mentioned. I think the specific advancement of our knowledge of the evolutionary processes that shaped us and the inner-workings of our mind will be critical for our future, if we're to make correct decisions in dealing with the global problems we face around! I recently commented that "If we take in account all our flaws, I am willing to bet no money on us making the right collective decisions that will secure a reasonable future for our children or them dealing with our mistakes by making even harder decisions to ensure the survival of their own children!" (http://bit.ly/cm7x8J) We can only make rational decisions as a group if we better understand what influences us in making a particular choice! Having a working model of the mind and group interaction like scientists use for e.g. climate predictions may help!