Tyler Dickinson

Graduate Student - Philosophy, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Edgerton, WI, United States

About Tyler

Areas of Expertise

Philosophy, Phenomenology, Theology, Philosophy of Religion, Ethics and Theology, Virtue Ethics, Philosophy of Friendship

Comments & conversations

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Tyler Dickinson
Posted 8 months ago
Jane McGonigal: Massively multi-player… thumb-wrestling?
This...is...awesome. Count me in! I love a new twist to an old classic. In fact, I was just talking with a friend last week about thumb wrestling. Apparently, in Lithuania, where he's from, they start a thumb war saying something like "1, 2, 3, let's start" ... definitely not as cool as our "1, 2, 3, 4, I declare a thumb war!" Now we wait for the release of Massively Multiplayer Finger Fencing....although that might be dangerous...
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Tyler Dickinson
Posted 8 months ago
Henry Evans and Chad Jenkins: Meet the robots for humanity
Whenever I've seen a TED talk like this--where a person with some sort of physical limitation comes on stage--I always gear up for an inspiring and somewhat emotional presentation. Henry's talk featured something not as common in these sorts of talks...he is funny! I enjoyed this presentation, and I think there is great hope for the future of robotics. I was particularly struck by what he said at the end, about robots serving not to replace people, but to help them. Bravo!
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Tyler Dickinson
Posted 8 months ago
James Flynn: Why our IQ levels are higher than our grandparents'
I can't say I follow, Alan. "Fundamentalist", at least as far as I understand the term to mean in common usage, seems to be at the antithesis of abstraction. Fundamentalists are restricted to a particular interpretation in a particular hermeneutic; they can't even imagine something else to be possible. For example, some (not all) Christian fundamentalists, tied down to the KJV Bible, actually think Jesus spoke English. They read the Gospels so literally that they can't even imagine that Jesus didn't speak these exact words (but rather, something in Aramaic or Hebrew or, perhaps, Greek, which has since been translated into English). Similarly, some fundamentalist Darwinians hold so tight to their notion of evolution as a non-directed process of natural selection, mutation, and adaptation, that they cannot even conceive of such processes possibly being directed by an intelligent being. Nothing intrinsic to these processes demands that evolution be non-directed. (NB: some will admit to a type of genetic determinism, or even a more general fatalism, but will not consider that "directed".) In either case--and these are only examples of the broader scope--fundamentalist does not seem to coincide with "abstraction". It also just occurred to me that perhaps by "underwritten" you actually meant "diminished", rather than "verified"? Please clarify.
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Tyler Dickinson
Posted 9 months ago
Chris Downey: Design with the blind in mind
Wow, I will look--no pun intended--at the world in a whole new way now. I have to say, though, sometimes you don't want to smell the city.... But I've never thought before about how the city is in some ways intuitively designed for blind people. Interesting. Question for blind people: I see braille all over the place, and sometimes in the most unintuitive places...but, as I said, I can SEE the braille. How do you know where to find it when you can't see it?
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Tyler Dickinson
Posted 9 months ago
Joe DeRisi: Solving medical mysteries
I'd be interested to see how this technology has changed today. Have there been new technologies developed that now make this obsolete? Or has this technology evolved to keep up with the latest developments in medicine?
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Tyler Dickinson
Posted 9 months ago
Lennart Green: Close-up card magic with a twist
Love it. Very skilled and talented. I could watch this again and again. In fact, I stopped and replayed a few parts, first because it was unbelievable, then to try to figure out how he does it. Some parts I could guess, but others still blow my mind. And he's hysterical, too. I get a kick out of watching his assistant, as well. Keep an eye on her reactions. "misdirection". Probably my fave.
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Tyler Dickinson
Posted 9 months ago
Keith Barry: Brain magic
P.S. Interesting thought I just had while reading through the comments: how did he do it? We're a very trusting audience. I'm not saying this is how he did it, but did anyone else raise an eyebrow (or attempt to do so, if you're not physiologically capable) when he asked the two volunteers if they had ever met before, etc.? If I were telling you a lie, and you asked me, "Are you lying to me?", I would of course say "No", which would itself be a lie. If he had prearranged things with particular audience members, is he really going to say, when he calls them up on stage, "We've met before, right? And I clued you into what I'm going to do, right?" In other words, it's completely possible that he did prearrange with the so-called volunteers. How would we know? Multiple (very observant) commentors point out his leg moving up and down. I also find this interesting: in the case that he really has not prearranged with the volunteers, it still works. He alerts the volunteer to "a certain pressure", which ends up being on the person's food, rather than on the person's hand. Hence, when the gal dropped her arm quickly, the guy didn't know, and he moved at the normal pace. Of course, this still doesn't explain how she felt the pressures (obviously cannot be static electricity), how he knew "Mike"'s name, or the Styrofoam cups demonstration....these baffle me (and I'm alright remaining baffled, too).