Lee-Michael D'Souza

About Lee-Michael

Languages

English

Comments & conversations

Noface
Lee-Michael D'Souza
Posted 7 months ago
Are you truly happy with the world we currently live in?
Would you say that there's a subconscious (at times even conscious - depending on the person) intended ignorance with the joy? To escape your own, but arguably more importantly the world's problems by escaping into joy - doing what you like. Of course there's nothing wrong with that because we are human of course and we all do this, after all we get home from work and then relax/do something we like. This is where the odd sense of selfishness comes in, we know there are problems but rather than use certain time to tackle vital problems we escape into our own world of joy. Essentially leaving the majority of the burden of it to someone else or something else, like a government who in turn generally don't help these matters either and even making it worse. This part of a government's duty seems to have become less and less important as time goes on. The problem is, with how things are currently it doesn't seem like it's going to get any better.
Noface
Lee-Michael D'Souza
Posted 8 months ago
Let's talk about humor
I am not sure, although I can say that humour can definitely take your mind off things, although I believe it is always better to accept your depression and face it head on. On the other hand depending on how each person thinks about it humour could suppress the depression at least. I am a person that loves to laugh, but regardless of how much I laugh I will always have problems that will cause depression. I guess there's a time and place for both.
Noface
Lee-Michael D'Souza
Posted 8 months ago
Let's talk about humor
From a spiritual standing I feel humour is the essence of life. Regardless of what type of humour you have it is always comforting sharing your sense of humour with another person - with the same or similar sense as you. It simply brings endless joy to life and that is what makes it important. Arguably it's what make life important itself hence the essence of life.I cannot imagine greater like like human beings without humour. Wouldn't chickens gain vast respect if they could genuinely laugh? Would we then not even kill them for their food qualities? I've come across vastly different humours, from the regular content based humour that most people share to wild humours that only a specific few may understand. I believe it's important to accept all kinds of humour as it keeps you open-minded towards others, regardless of who they are. I'm not too sure of cultural senses of humour even though I have traveled frequently across the globe. Although I will say regardless of your background, ethnicity, some people do share the same humour across entire continents.
Noface
Lee-Michael D'Souza
Posted 9 months ago
Hans Rosling: Religions and babies
Aha, I see where you're coming from and you're right in the sense that if such religions or ways of life were passed on that strongly it will naturally gain predominance over time therefore increasing the numbers over the estimated numbers because they simply weren't taken into account in the first place. Although I believe that you have to take into account that the world is advancing as a whole. In this sense, such environments for such a religion will become more advanced. More popular religions started off like this religion and they've all followed the same pattern of having more children, then fewer as time went on and their country grew more developed. This is because it comes down to how many children you can then afford in a more developed society. because of this I find it hard to believe that the religion will consistently produce more than the currently estimated number for the future. Not to mention that non-religious people are on the rise. Producing a high amount of children due to a belief system over your current state of affairs in a more developed country is something I doubt will happen. Put simply, those that are currently resisting the decline in fertility will be less and less resisting after each and every generation. This will be due to the development of countries - or areas within countries - where these people are present. Creating an environment much like the major ones Rosling and other demographers use to draw data. It's inevitable - consistently having a high number of children generation after generation in a more developed world will just be harder on the parents and way more costly. More and more people in these religions or ways of life will realise this themselves and opt to not have more children because it would be expensive. Thus they will fall into the same category that Rosling and others are currently using to provide information for their research and conclusion drawing. Their methods will remain accurate.
Noface
Lee-Michael D'Souza
Posted 9 months ago
Why do you come to TED conversations?
To find people with wildly different perspectives on the world, humanity, art, literature etc. than myself, perspectives that I would never have come across naturally by being myself. I'll then adapt and add this new way of thinking to my own, this lush new take on the world and see everything I saw before but in a new light. I wish to broaden my horizons with it all so that I may become a more knowledgeable and truly wiser person. For it is all so highly interesting.
Noface
Lee-Michael D'Souza
Posted 9 months ago
What is the future of wearable technology?
You've brought up the absolute key points of wearable technology, but I honestly think that what may dominate over your points is the consumer itself. Take for example phones, they are increasing in power and merging with the newer technologies and everyone today, especially youths, are replacing their phones every 1 to 3 years. It is simply a must in this day and age, it is the trendy thing to do and everyone wants to be caught up with the newest technology. I don't see this stopping any time soon. If such is the case, phones will probably end up as some sort of holographic screen, which may be implemented onto clothing. Or, if the physical form retains its shape and if you could do anything with just your voice, then I'm sure people would have some sort of microphone in or attached to their collar so they could activate anything they wanted with ease on their phone. As you said it goes into many different areas, but the main point is if it will make things easier for the generations to come (especially for things such as social networking and taking pictures) then I'm sure it will be implemented in clothing and it will be a casual thing. In the sense that it will become a part of all of the newer generations lifestyles. In a way it seems nice, the beginner steps to that futuristic land we can imagine the one with floating cars and the likes.
Noface
Lee-Michael D'Souza
Posted 9 months ago
What is the future of wearable technology?
Well said, it's somewhat a shame that the more recent generations have become increasingly more materialistic, I'd say. Not knowing that true value and wonder of what we don't even fully understand yet. I guess that's part of what makes it fascinating.
Noface
Lee-Michael D'Souza
Posted 9 months ago
How can a human being overcome selfishness, the idea that one is separate from the rest of humanity?
As a foundation, anything that benefits humanity would have to use the same mechanism of target, method and resources. This can be personalised to a person, like the archer, for he is firing the arrow for his own means which is where the concept of selfishness arises. When in a society the same mechanism is used although more dynamically. For example a target that a team of people would have to work together to achieve, which sums up the way everything in this world works when involving humans. Where the individual people on the team are the resources and the method includes things like teamwork and knowledge, where their goal may be to sell or promote something. Which brings me to this defining point, they are all there for their own reasons. Their own reason, some may even call it selfish. It's funny in fact, being driven by selfishness we actually passively become selfless, because in a society we've got to work together for out own and eachothers sake. By doing what we do as humans naturally we are benefiting humanity without even knowing it, I guess the main idea is to take on this alternate way of thought when thinking about selfishness and benefiting humanity. I was going to write something about living in an ideal world where everyone loved everyone and there was no conflict etc. but as I wrote the above I realised that the ideal world does not stay true to what humanity really is. I'm not sure if I've solved your answer at all or if I've gone way off track. Please, in a way, critique my response because it's my first time posting here and I'm just trying to gauge the levels of thought. Thanks in advance.
Noface
Lee-Michael D'Souza
Posted 9 months ago
Hans Rosling: Religions and babies
'unless we can prove that there is no correlation between how many children you have in relation to how many your parents have' - John Taves You are a different person from your parents, how many children you have is up to you. Granted that this may be influenced by your parents - mainly through religion - this talk covers that area specifically and a conclusion was even drawn for that. Religion has very little to do with the number of children. Hans Rosling covers the expected future population using patterns found through the use of software - drawing conclusions from analysis of what's happened in the past. As you've mentioned, this of course does not take into account non-renewable sources and the likes. You seem to have gone off on a tangent of self-regulation which is not the topic at hand in this talk, nor the purpose of this talk. The purpose of this talk was to explain religions influence on the number of children and to show the estimated future population if we are to keep going at this rate. I reiterate, what you are talking about is not the purpose of this talk so it did not need to be included for it is a different topic dealing with other issues. Even if the topics are related. You should express these opinions on a more relevant talk, or if you're lucky, Rosling may happen to elaborate on related areas of this talk. Maybe covering what you're concerned with. I'm sure he has insight about what you've mentioned already, it's not like this wouldn't cross his mind as you so thought.