Dan Conine

Owner, Nature Creek Farm
Belgium, WI, United States

About Dan

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

machinery, understanding, inventions and innovations, Agriculture engineering, Energy

An idea worth spreading

Net Future Usefulness is necessary for any species to survive.
Reduction of consumption is much easier than trying to increase production to make up for waste.

Universities

Knowledge not College

Talk to me about

Problems that you have tried to get solved by other people.

People don't know I'm good at

Seeing the truth.

Comments & conversations

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Dan Conine
Posted almost 2 years ago
Mike Rowe: Learning from dirty jobs
Oh, and I also wanted to say, "Great job, Mike", both in this talk and on the show. As a farmer, when people ask how I would describe what I do, I say, "Farming is mostly about killing shit and cleaning shit up." Thanks for your good work.
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Dan Conine
Posted almost 2 years ago
Mike Rowe: Learning from dirty jobs
When was the last time you heard of a high school counselor telling a SMART kid that they should become a farmer, or a plumber, or a mechanic? It's all about EXTRACTION of the value of kids from the world and feeding their essence into a System of systems. Civilization has become a pyramid scheme. The purpose of the labor at the bottom is not to feed the System, but to care for the land and the resources that must be nurtured to exist for us in the future. Husbandry is not extraction any more than mothering should be providing children as cannon fodder. Capitalism wants us to believe we serve profits, and we have to fight that coercive force if we are to care for the source of the value of capitalism. The base of the pyramid has to be kept in good order, or it gets crushed by the weight of civilization. Along with the war on work has been a class war that everyone lost to money.
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Dan Conine
Posted about 2 years ago
Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley
http://www.joebageant.com/joe/2007/04/a_feral_dog_how.html It is time to close America's universities, and perhaps prosecute the professoriat under the RICO act as a corrupt and racketeering-influenced organization. American universities these days have the moral character of electronic churches, and as little educational value. They are an embarrassment to civilization. -- Fred Reed, American expatriate writer and "equal-opportunity irritant"
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Dan Conine
Posted about 2 years ago
Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley
I see you read the whole thing I wrote..... sigh. The point is that we are already making the choice for everyone: they are forced into an education system that pushes more education as the lofty goal of the education system. It is not a system that evaluates the needs of our future based on real world needs. It tries to find a slot within the intellectual money-grubbing system for every person, and if they can't afford it, the system creates a way to coerce them into debt to pay for it, all because the basic premise of "success" is based on harvesting children from the place they are born and selling them as "professionals" to the highest bidders. Meanwhile, no school counselor encourages a kid with a high test score to become a plumber or farmer or machinist or ditch digger, but we need smart plumbers, farmers and ditch diggers just as much as we need smart physicists. This has created a huge disparity between the classes of people, and a delusion that there is such a thing as a middle class. The reality is that we have two classes of people: those who exploit and those who are exploited. The culture (media, for any other word) encourages everyone to strive toward the exploiting class, but in reality, that striving is the key to suckering them into working for someone else. The intellectual group in our society should be telling us about this, but instead it spends its time making excuses for the behavior of the exploiters, telling us all how we can either take advantage of the system (through their classrooms, of course) or how we can "rebel" as "activists" that are basically powerless without the money involved in the exploiting/extractive processes. I do not presume to choose FOR people, but to explain that We Don't Need Them: they need us. http://www.dissidentvoice.org/Nov05/Carpenter1102.htm
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Dan Conine
Posted about 2 years ago
Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley
Point taken. I guess my point was that there are too many lawyers involved in the process and not enough teachers. There really needs to be a lot more brain research and behavior research use, but at the same time less of it. What I mean is that human beings are habitual creatures, not intentional ones. Most of the educational 'reforms' are based on people making choices intentionally and thoughtfully, and students are approached with the same specialized view as your teachers with individual subject matter. While I have a preference for using data, I know that I make choices by emotion and habit. Education needs to steal the power away from Madison Avenue: use the psychological techniques developed by religions and marketing professionals to form habits in children, rather than trying to "convince" them and their parents to try and live according to conscious choices. Research shows that humans can only make a couple of hard choices a day and then that function is pretty much depleted for the day. Trying to live intentionally all of the time makes us insane. Trying to teach children to do so with the modern system of education makes them robots at the mercy of our emotional nature. This isn't easy. It requires a complete cultural reform, not just education. It means ending the belief that we can just buy better educations or comfortable lives, and the destructive behaviors that come with trying to get the money to do so.
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Dan Conine
Posted about 2 years ago
Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley
What if a thriving human mind isn't necessarily the goal we should seek? I will grant that SOME should be pursuing education with all the gusto they can, but as a rule, we also need people who are skilled at showing up for work and laboring without too much thought. Sometimes they are interchangeable, and a thinking person will take a day labor job to have time to think, but the system that conforms to a consumer economy, a corporatocracy, and mindless beliefs is no system at all and we would be better off without it. Humanism isn't necessarily a good thing when it leads to consuming our future waiting for The Next Big Thing to create even more humans. Any farmer knows you don't keep adding cows to the farm when you don't have enough acreage to feed them all. Meanwhile, our education system teaches us to serve humanity's extractive processes at the expense of everything else, rather than teaching people to serve everything else because humans are dependent on it. Childhood's End means letting go of selfish behaviors and ignorant prejudices. The foremost ignorant prejudice is that humans are more important than the world that birthed them: a prejudice based on the perpetual education of children with fears of Hell and fantasies of Heaven, and these teaching tools are even more prevalent and anti-creative than anything formal institutions will come up with.
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Dan Conine
Posted about 2 years ago
Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley
Unfortunately, the testing is applied to students rather than the teachers. In addition, there are other ways to document incompetence: like evaluations by staff and school boards. Unfortunately, the lawyers that the teachers' unions can afford are much better paid than the lawyers that the average school can afford.
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Dan Conine
Posted over 2 years ago
Lawrence Lessig: We the People, and the Republic we must reclaim
Small campaign finance/redistribution is the other side of the corruption coin. The face of it, however, is that the rich get richer because the masses buy their stuff and work for them. One dollar, one vote. In order to really defeat the corruption of the culture, we have to address the culture of consumerism for what it is: it's the sacrificing of individual responsibility (even to grow and prepare our own food) in exchange for the 'safety' and 'security' of having someone else do it for us. This is also the root of your climate problems. The means to address it is to install a feedback mechanism that puts the real costs of every purchase at the deciding point: the cash registers. That means replacing the corrupt income tax with a sales tax. I like the FairTax (but raise the rate and the prebate until the air and water are clean and everyone can eat). Without a feedback mechanism, any machinery will end up open-loop or dependent on morality, which is automatically a failure.