Eddie Hagler

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Eddie Hagler
Posted about 1 year ago
Robert Full: The secrets of nature's grossest creatures, channeled into robots
While I would not approve of anyone child or adult pulling the legs off of a cockroach just for the pleasure of doing it. I have no problem with a researcher doing it in an effort to understand the limits and construction of a cockroach. This is in part because I have no problem intentionally stepping on a cockroach to kill it because it is a pest and presents a danger to human life by existing in our human habitat where our style of living mandates a certain level of cleanliness to maintain an environment healthy for humans to live. I do not consider that insect life such as cockroaches deserve the inference of "decency" rights that protect them from cruel treatment. Rather I it is the desire to have decent human beings that make me look down on those that torture even insects for fun. The argument that we are connected through evolution seems bankrupt of logic since it is the survivor-ship of the species that is the preeminent objective of evolution. Given that argument and the predictions that cockroaches will outlive us all.... I say kill them all...learn all we can... evolution demands we learn how to survive. There is no such regard for "decency" in the logic of evolution. Why do you infer such?
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Eddie Hagler
Posted almost 2 years ago
Amanda Bennett: We need a heroic narrative for death
"It is a good day to die." Crazy Horse For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive. (1 Corinthians 15:22) But I would not have you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning them which are asleep, that ye sorrow not, even as others which have no hope. (1 Thessalonians 4:13) We are born and live to bring glory to God. If we are justified by God (by his grace) then death has no power to separate us for long from our loved one who also believe in Christ. Death is a portal into the eternal. It is not something to be feared unless you have no real hope.
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Eddie Hagler
Posted almost 2 years ago
Jason Pontin: Can technology solve our big problems?
The very nature of GMO farming is fraught with dangers and they really have no idea what they are doing. They are like a bunch of 10 year-olds who have just figured out they can do neat things with tools they don't understand. Only they are playing with the food supply of Thousands if not millions of people. There are questions as to the health of GMO products since they are inserting genes into places they do not belong. cross breeding is one thing. That is using natural processes to create varieties that will better suit conditions that exists in a given area. Inserting genes is like creating monsters... you simply do not know what the long term implications are. There are questions as to the healthiness of such crops and the fact that so few types of crops are feeding so many. You have basically wheat, corn, soy and not much else feeding everybody. So if you make those crops hard to digest but easy to grow you can cause real health issues as we are seeing today. As for "Patent" rights... unless they created the entire gene sequence I don't really think that Monsanto or any other company should really be allowed to claim such rights. They are not God... they did not create the gene sequence. It's kinda like someone taking a great literary work and cutting out passages and moving them around or adding chapters from other works of art and then claiming copyright on that mash up of other peoples work. It seems kinda disingenuous. What kind of monster plants are they creating? Do they really know? Should they really be trusted to do so? I agree that "Organic" doesn't always mean what people think it does. And yes there is greed everywhere. People have to be careful who they trust to produce their food. The quality of GMO food seems to be decreasing the quality of the food supply. That may just be an unintended consequence of "scalability" but it becomes a real problem when it starts affecting the health of the world.
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Eddie Hagler
Posted almost 2 years ago
Blaise Ag├╝era y Arcas: How PhotoSynth can connect the world's images
"Collective memory" That is a scary concept when one considers the "image" of the Beast of Revelations. What I want to know is how all of this data is collated.... given the fact that photos are taken at different times (maybe after changes have been made, maybe altered.... take in different weather.... etc.... how trustworthy can it be? Does it depend on a large number of photos to be accurate?
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Eddie Hagler
Posted almost 2 years ago
The concept that profits directed from oil companies do not solve problems the people make for themselves
I have yet to meet a native up here who didn't have at least an Auntie or an uncle around. Although I have met many aunties and uncles who are more addicted to alcohol than any of the younger ones. I don't get the sense that there is a lot of "abuse" in their lives. Bad examples but not a lot of abuse seem to be a big part of the problem. A lot of the older ones are no older than myself but look so much older. Countless times I see them drunk. Sometimes they have blood alcohol levels so high it is a miracle they do not die. Sometimes they do die. There is a halfway house near to Fairbanks and the prisoners there come into town on a van to work or do other things including go to counseling. Often times when they get out they get drunk and continue a self destructive lifestyle. It seems to me that the effect white culture has had on the native tribes here may be a substantial cause of many of the addictions the natives here have trouble escaping, never mind the cold temperatures and the natural lack of things to do besides drink. One older native told me that when he was young and living in the village he looked around and realized that there was nothing to do but drink. He told himself if he didn't get out of there he would be dead by 40. He said his friends that did not leave were in fact all dead by 40.
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Eddie Hagler
Posted almost 2 years ago
Jason Pontin: Can technology solve our big problems?
People who do not "wake up" will "go the way of the Dodo bird." They will see themselves and their children sicken and die. No technology will be sufficient to save them from this. People will wake up sooner or later. I personally do not believe in evolution. I believe in a Creator (I believe that Jesus Christ created the world as it says in John chapter 1) I believe he designed the genes that mankind likes to play with. While I don't generally find a moral problem with that I find it to be generally unwise since we do not have any real idea what we are dealing with. We should proceed with caution and not an arrogance that condemns us to make mistakes as is so often the case. I think that the time proven ways of farming are more productive in the long run. The small farm I think will in the end prove the more "sustainable" way to produce food. That does not mean there is no place for large farms but they will have to be regulated to insure they do not hurt the food supply by either economic policies (taking seeds away from farmers) or by polluting the food supply with unhealthy crops and cultivars.
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Eddie Hagler
Posted almost 2 years ago
Jason Pontin: Can technology solve our big problems?
I am not suggesting that cities should try to raise enough chickens to supply all the eggs consumed by all the residents of the city but they could easily host enough chickens to supply a significant percentage of the eggs consumed in the city. (only the lucky ones who either raise them or know someone who does would have access to the higher quality eggs.) The story I was referring to on the splendid table was about someone in New York city. http://www.splendidtable.org/episode/400 Urban homesteading is a concept slowly gaining traction. Think about families in WW2.. the concept of the victory garden to help feed a nation at war. Such gardens could become the norm not the exception and maybe they should. Food is not that hard to produce.... it just takes a little work. When people get hungry... laziness is no longer affordable. As for the problems with GMO food.... At the 12th Scientific Conference of the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM) in 1988, more than 60 countries voted unanimously against the use of GMOs in food production and agriculture because they felt there were unacceptable risks involved: threats to human health, a negative and irreversible environmental impact, incompatibility with sustainable agriculture, and a violation of rights for both farmers and consumers http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/green-science/organic-farming2.htm And why?... take at look at this list of problems cause by GMO foods.... http://listverse.com/2013/06/22/10-problems-genetically-modified-foods-are-already-causing/ or this list. http://www.psrast.org/
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Eddie Hagler
Posted almost 2 years ago
The concept that profits directed from oil companies do not solve problems the people make for themselves
Yes, they receive help from their tribes, from private charities (available at the local rescue mission and other sources) as well as government programs set up to deal with intoxicated natives that are arrested. They often have family that will encourage them to stop drinking or doing drugs. They simply will not stay away from addictive substances. For instance one young man I knew.... He came to the transit station on his birthday drunk out of his mind, walking in front of buses. I arrested him and called the CSP Community Service Patrol (a private security organization that patrols the downtown areas and deal with drunks, taking them to sleep off, the hospital, "home" or the drunk tank as needed.) They took him home. The next time I saw him he was sober and undergoing counseling to get off the booze. (he had also started smoking pot to get over the cravings for booze) He seemed to be doing well for a while. One day I saw him he was a little more nervous than usual. I found out later he had robbed a store to get money for booze and was wanted by the police. I haven't seen him since. Others bounce between counseling and partying. It is a sad thing to see.