Derek Martinez

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Derek Martinez
Posted almost 2 years ago
i think, therefore we exist.
Thank you for explaining. I appreciate you helping me to understand that, and you did a great job at explaining. It truly is fascinating how many paths their are to understanding our universe.
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Derek Martinez
Posted almost 2 years ago
i think, therefore we exist.
It is a fascinating question, I agree with you on that. Let us for a moment consider the example you provided: that Vishnu is dreaming and were are all the creation of his dream. For the sake of debate, let us say that this is true. Vishnu is dreaming, and we are all in his dream. Consider this: We you dreaming, your dream is from one point of view - whether that be from one person or as if you were holding a camera above the action in your dream. However, if you are dreaming as if you are holding a camera above some action or event, have you ever noticed you are unable to know what the characters in your dream are thinking? On this planet, we have 7 billion points of view or sets of ideas about the world around us - one for each person on earth - I tried to prove or at least support the concept these ideas do exist, in my last post. Of course, I'm trying to mix religion and science here, which gets messy because religion is (by today's standards) impossible to prove. So much of what I'm saying is not pure logical reasoning. But its fun to think about it anyway, eh?! Thanks.
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Derek Martinez
Posted almost 2 years ago
i think, therefore we exist.
You pose a very deep philosophical question. Descartes quote, "Je pense, donc je suis" (I think, therefore I am) is certainly a mind-stretching quote because of its intense transcendent nature. The first thought that pops into my mind when I here that quote is "How can I prove my own existence?". What if my life is an illusion? What if everything happening in and around me doesn't exist? However, I think Descartes really struck home with "I think, therefore I am". Right now, I'm typing keys on a keyboard. My conscious is also aware of my typing, and that fact is an idea in my head. An idea cannot stand alone; you need a device to hold it, to nurture it, in this case a human brain. You cannot hold onto an idea - it is intangible. There is nothing anchoring it to reality, except our minds which hold and these ideas. You cannot put an idea into a cardboard box, like the one that your last shipment of Christmas gifts came in. One cannot physically touch, hold, or drop and idea. Even a computer cannot hold an idea - however it can hold words, which can be understood by the next person who reads them. These words can then be formulated into an idea similar to the first. The entire last paragraph was an attempt to gather evidence to support this statement: If an idea cannot stand alone, and ideas exist, then something must be mentally holding that idea. Therefore, if an idea exists, the mental holding container for it must exist as well. Every human is born with a mental holding container - our brains. It has be proven humans have brains (thousands and millions of cells producing chemical reactions that allow the process of thought). Therefore, if ideas exist, then brains exist. If brains exist, humans exist. And if humans exist, you and I exist. Any questions? Comments? Rebuttals?
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Derek Martinez
Posted almost 2 years ago
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Can you give me an example of an idea that's not dangerous?
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Derek Martinez
Posted almost 2 years ago
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Danger is subjective to how an idea is used. For example, water is a life giving substance, and in many cases is a symbol of life (walking through the desert and coming across a oasis containing a waterfall). However, drowning is very scary thought and every year takes the lives of a number of people (drowning in a flood). Dangerous is defined as "able or likely to cause harm or injury". All things all dangerous in a sense; a surgeons knife used in open heart surgery to save a patient can be used to murder someone, or life-saving antibiotic can be overdosed on. So, to answer your question, as a person who likes to logically see both sides of an argument, I believe great ideas are always dangerous but at the same time a always helpful. Great ideas live in a constant state of being spliced down the middle. Take democracy for example; although a revolutionary idea (by the standard of human history) it opens up an area to a whole range of problems. Take the United States for example: how can the country continue to pay for education for all its public schools, health care, welfare, decaying infrastructure and public transportation without rising more and more into debt and not raising taxes? Now don't misconstrue that last statement: Would I gladly take those problems over a dictatorship or totalitarian government every time? YES. Ideas inspire action, but for one idea there may be a thousand resulting actions. As with almost any deep philosophical question that's poised to one man or another, the answer usually revolves somewhere in the vicinity of "It depends". "Right" and "Wrong" are hazardous words to use because they imply absolute and total certainty. Something you might think is certain can be suddenly disproved. For example, until the scientist Barry Marshall (look him up) came along, the entire world was convinced stress caused ulcers, when in reality is was the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. Any questions?