Taryn Kitchen

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Taryn Kitchen
Posted almost 2 years ago
What is the purpose of education?: The most important question in the education revolution
Keith, I meant the question as "what *should* the purpose of education be", but as that wasn't explicitly clear in my phrasing, this comment in an important one to add and I thank you for it. The system as it is does likely have the sort of hidden (are they hidden?) goals that you have mentioned. I would also add to that list "homogenous, uncreative, and passive" However, if this program has been so successful, how did we get here? Yes, it churns out many obedient graduates ready for the corporate consumer world, but it must not be so successful if there are also so many individuals that are able to think critically and defiantly, as clearly evidenced by this one thread.
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Taryn Kitchen
Posted almost 2 years ago
What is the purpose of education?: The most important question in the education revolution
Chad, thank you for this contribution. It is so well informed and very relevant to today's issues. I have had many a conversation discussing whether content knowledge is obsolete and whether we still need to learn facts that can be looked up on a device in our pockets, and I have come to the conclusion that it is necessary to some extent. In order to apply new knowledge, put it in its proper context, or think critically about it in any way, we have to have some sort of footing of knowledge in our heads to compare it to. Yes, we only retain a small percent of what we learn (as you said, 20%), but if we dont learn much, 20% of not much is pretty useless! That being said, your comments about self awareness and learning what it means to be human are crucial. Factual knowledge is useless without this sort of understanding. I think you philosophy is very well centered on what is really important in life and where we should be headed for the future if we want to create a world that we actually want to be a part of. I wish you the best of luck with the TED prize. Although I am still a student, creating a revolutionary school model is my life goal as well and its always reassuring for me to find others working towards that same goal. I'm not so sure there is such a thing as one "ideal" school, but there are definitely ways to do it better for particular students, and we can definitely keep heading closer towards those ideal schools.
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Taryn Kitchen
Posted almost 2 years ago
What is the purpose of education?: The most important question in the education revolution
I very much agree with you and would love to see a school where students are led to discover their individual passions and talents, rather than being discouraged from learning, but I fear that it is a blindly optimistic philosophy. This fear is grounded in that belief that, to some extent, children need to be guided to develop skills that they aren't naturally drawn to. For instance, the child who has a love of music would also benefit in life from understanding how to do things they consider boring, such as spelling or doing basic math. So I believe that some skills are essential for all kids to be taught, especially at the primary level, but there definitely needs to be more encouraging students to strengthen their natural talents and developing their own unique purposes than our school system currently allows for.
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Taryn Kitchen
Posted almost 2 years ago
What is the purpose of education?: The most important question in the education revolution
There are many different interpretations, even within Christianity, on how to properly serve God. When the American public school (or common school) system was created, there was great debate over whether Protestant, Catholic, or no religious content should be included. So I'm curious as to how you believe it should be decided/ who should decide what is the "proper" way that all children should learn to serve God.
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Taryn Kitchen
Posted almost 2 years ago
What is the purpose of education?: The most important question in the education revolution
Robert, I agree that there is no one-size-fits all school system and that there should be different options to suit people with different goals and needs, and thus there should not be a standardized curriculum. However, to your point about not making everyone go to school, what about those kids who think they don't care about school, and just need to be guided for a while until they find their passions and interests. They might get later in life and find something they are really interested in, and not have the educational background to be able to pursue it. I think there would be a whole lot of kids who, if given the choice, would choose to sit home rather than do all the work required for school, because kids only focus on the here and now and dont see school's potential benefits for the future. and it is for their own best interests, as well as society's, that there are not massive amounts of uneducated clueless bums who arent capable of doing much of anything. I know what you mean about those kids who drag down the other kids who really do want to learn, but I think it would be a mistake to take them out of school all together.
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Taryn Kitchen
Posted almost 2 years ago
What is the purpose of education?: The most important question in the education revolution
I completely agree Mark, what would be the purpose of just learning facts if we couldnt see the value of life and discover our purpose. Education needs to help guide us to find that purpose snd give us the tools to pursue it. This, however, is a pretty difficult task to accomplish, as it is difficult to find the proper balance between guiding and directing, and even worse, one risks guiding someone in the "wrong" direction.