Brian Bernard

Creator, author, musician, Sivmia
Ogden, UT, United States

About Brian

Bio

Born and raised in suburban Utah. At age 23, I induced an existential crisis (well, one way or the other, it happened... Kind of a chicken/egg situation) and survived to tell the tale. The diary I kept was later published under the title To Ignite But Not Burn: A personal account of transcending chaos. This is my first contribution into transforming humanity for the better, but far from the last.

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

Listening and speaking the core truth, noticing patterns, Problem Solving, Seeing beauty in everything, Namaste, Loving Kindness , Instigating self love and personal discovery, Switching self destruction into Self Creation

An idea worth spreading

Zero is the cup that holds infinity. A person's potential is infinite, and barring limits based in the laws of physics, limitations only exist in our minds. The amount of a person's potential that is allowed to be expressed is dependent on his/her ability and willingness to be nothing. This applies to the whole as well. If we can reprioritize to the point where life is number one, thereby eliminating each illusion of division between ourselves, our communities and our environment, we can accomplish anything. If nothing divides us, we are infinite.

I'm passionate about

Personal evolution, collective evolution, transcendence, wisdom, understanding, music, writing, listening, love, trust, humiilty and gratitude. True alchemy: self-destruction into self-creation.

Talk to me about

Literally anything. What's holding you back from expressing what Nature intended to express through you? How may I help instigate the brightest version of you?

People don't know I'm good at

Sensing my way around without the use of my eyes.

My TED story

In mid August 2011, I entered the most difficult awakening/recovery/rediscovery period of my young life. Desperate to find inspiration and reason to continue, I started watching TED talks religiously. I found immense comfort and impetus to keep going in life based on the notion that I may have a place in the world after all, that there are others out there who think like me, and others that would sincerely benefit from hearing what I had to say. Brene Brown's talk on vulnerability was possibly the single most transformative of them all, followed closely by Sarah Kay's. Ever since then, I've found my own footing and I'm ready, willing and able to share my own wisdom with the world, tossing a rope back to those who may be in a similar sittuation that I felt stuck in 2 years ago.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

196990
Brian Bernard
Posted over 1 year ago
What living artist would you love to collaborate with?
Alexa Meade or Alex Grey. Meade would be extremely fun to work with, I'd really enjoy being a part of her art. It's so avant garde, I love the way she thinks. Alex Grey has long been my favorite artist. On a level of philosophy, what he's discussed in his books is equally as powerful as his artwork, both of which are extremely moving to me. His philosophy of art is right in sync with my own approach to my music and writing. With such profound common ground, it is very intriguing to see what would happen if we blended ideas.
196990
Brian Bernard
Posted over 1 year ago
What impact does pain brings in our lives ?
Pain is a very interesting thing for me. A couple of years ago, I started getting piercings, and reached a total of 10 before gradually taking them out. The point was not so much the looks, but to find a new approach and relationship to pain. Pain is an inevitability, and to approach it with a clear mentality (not judging it to be "bad" or seeking to avoid it), it can leave a beautiful mark on a person. This approach really came in handy a year ago, when I was robbed at gun point. I allowed myself to let the pain and the healing process take its own course, not trying to force it one way or another, and within 4 months completely overcame what's commonly called PTSD. My view of pain is that it touches something raw, possibly not ready to be touched. If we allow ourselves to step back and let the texture and taste of it, we could actually learn the value of it. The best way, for me anyway, as a writer and musician, is to explore those feelings in that context. In a way, I think that admitting vulnerabilities helps us to transcend them. As long as we don't identify with circumstance, pain should not be a big deal. I'm with you, that pain can be the pull that serves great art. It's not the only one, but it's definitely a thought worth exploring; thanks for the idea and I'll see what else I can dig out about the topic!
196990
Brian Bernard
Posted over 1 year ago
The Internet: Has it made us more or less social?
Both. On the quantitative front, moreso, but information lacks quality. We need intimacy, the energetic exchange between two or more human beings occupying the same physical space. It blows my mind the possibilities of being able to reach as many people as I via the internet, it is certainly one of the new wonders of the world. But the quality lacks. At best, we have YouTube, I suppose, or other ways of communicating via video. That shows more information than mere text, but it's still merely information. Numbers may not lie, but they never tell the whole story. The next step is to figure out a way to balance out the qualitative aspect of socializing; without depth, breadth is spread too thin. And to have quality suffer in favor of quantity is not sustainable. A lot of people are going to lose their shit, basically. It's actually for this reason that I raise an eyebrow to online dating, but if used correctly, it could be a decent opportunity. Using it as a launchingpad to meet people, that is. There is absolutely no substitute to human contact and human touch. So if we can still maintain those things, I think we'll be fine. As for the loneliness aspect, that's something we need to approach from a totally different angle, I think. It's a more complicated beast than simply having friends, either online or in person. I'm currently exploring that, so I'll share ideas when they come.
196990
Brian Bernard
Posted almost 2 years ago
Is Philosophy dead?
By the literal definition of "philo-sophia," there is a lot of evidence that yes, the love of wisdom is dead. In several areas of life, we know better, but don't do better. As far as the discussion of ideas to refine our understanding - well, that's what we're doing right now, so no, philosophy is not dead. If anything, this is coming from a former philosophy major, pure left-brain person - if anything, we focus on it a little too much (the whole "logic is the best route to knowledge/wisdom/understanding" bs story). We're at a point now where simplifying is long overdue. Silence is just as important as sound, and we live in the most overstimulated era this world has yet seen. Taking a step back and giving our minds a break is becoming more and more mandatory every day. It's great to discuss ideas, but at the end of the day the only thing we truly need to focus on is what are we doing and why are we doing it, both as individuals and the collective. Hate to say it, but logic alone can only reveal, at BEST, 50% of what life has to offer. We need to put equal focus into the opposite side as well, if we truly are "lovers of wisdom."
196990
Brian Bernard
Posted almost 2 years ago
Does the "Think Realistic, Think Practical" attitude restrict innovation?
It is absolutely and unnecessarily limiting. There's a lot more to reality than pragmatism. Even look at some of the most "practical" inventions: many came to us through PLAY. Not work. This of course, however, depends on the definition of realistic. My definition is "reality says, 'this is happening,' and I say, 'ok.'" A lot of situations reality says is happening require a great deal of abstract reasoning, at least that's been the case in my life. After all, we are not simply here to survive. The pre-frontal cortices we all know and love evolved for more than just survival. Moreoever, the prefrontal cortex can be used for basically one of two things: Creating solution or creating/maintaining problems. Hate to say it, but the practical only mentality creates more problems than solutions. A lot of solutions come from dipping into the abstract. There needs to be a balance between function and essence, being and doing. One last dagger, but being preceeds doing - otherwise, you're working for the sake of working, producing for no other reason than to produce. Which is exactly what cancer does.
196990
Brian Bernard
Posted almost 2 years ago
How should one find his/her passion?
For me, it's always been clear. I didn't come from a musical family, but the moment I sat down with a bass guitar, that was the end for everything else. Writing has always been there, as well. First of all, it's ok to have a breadth of talents and interests; that's not unlike me... I couldn't settle on a major in college because of it, in fact. I consider myself lucky that I had my passions figured out for me. I have a lot of interests in many areas, but at the end of the day, the things that make my heart resonate the most fully are writing, music and sharing meaningful conversations with people I care about. To discover passion, I believe the most effect method is to take your self completely out of the picture. The times when I am absolutely at my peak in musical performance is when I have no concept of "me," the music IS me, and it just flows right out. This is a lot easier said than done, but it's that feeling of complete surrender, trust and gratitude that's experienced when you're doing something. Being preceeds doing, however, so to get in touch with your purpose, a certain amount of diving into your own person is necessary. My first book was my experience of doing just that. Argh... This is jumbled a bit, but I have to run. I hope it helps! Feel free to e-mail me anytime. I'd love to help in any way I possibly can.
196990
Brian Bernard
Posted almost 2 years ago
What will you sacrifice in order to live your extraordinary passion?
This is such an important question to consider on a regular basis. I'm an author, and I'm currently building a visionary multimedia empire with the intention of helping people transcend personal and cultural boundaries/limitations in order to live to their, and our, full potential. Definitely a huge undertaking, and there's no end to sacrifice. Sacrifice is a little different in my eyes. Letting go of anything that is inhibiting personal progress is my definition, which is less emphatic that the "let go of something 'good' for you so something 'better' may enter," current definition used. Some of the things that get in the way of personal progress aren't good for us at all. I've gone through several bouts of self-abnegation, and without fail, every time I let go of any concept of self, life flourishes for me. It's when I think I know what's going on, who I am, trying to preserve an identity that things get royally f'ed up. The biggest thing I sacrifice in order to see the fulfillment of my vision is my concept of self. I'm not doing this for me, or creating this, any more than an instrument plays itself and creates music. I am an instrument, not the music, not the player. This approach, coincidentally, allows a person to go with the natural flow so much easier. As for becoming an MD, I'm not sure exactly how much this helps, but it's my story, so I hope it helps in some way. Cheers and good luck! Feel free to e-mail me anytime. I love to chat about things that actually matter (like this). :)
196990
Brian Bernard
Posted almost 2 years ago
Does living in harmony with nature make you grow as a person?
Absolutely! It's too easy to forget what came first. This isn't a chicken/egg argument: we are products of nature, not nurture, yet we've nurtured ourselves into an unnatural disaster. We're the only things (living or not) that can choose to deny the natural process. That said, when we do choose to allow our own nature to shine, connect with the living environment around us and go forward in integrity, we can accomplish anything. I do believe that at this point in time, we're reaching a critical crossroads. The status quo is going to lead to our own demise. Returning to nature isn't optional for survival; we can only kid ourselves for so long, and that time is drawing near to an end. Speaking on a personal level, to answer the question simply: yes. My first book was the byproduct of spending a lot of time in nature. It's the place I can go to have guaranteed cliarity. Insights flood my mind, and I'm able to sort out everything that I need in order to move forward in the best direction for me. Meditating in nature is nonpareil for human development. Education is a very good thing, but it's often held to a much higher regard than simply being. The balance is necessary. Music without silence in between songs is just continuous and jumbled noise, and our minds won't have a chance to process the information properly. The silence nature offers 24/7 does the same thing. Cheers!
196990
Brian Bernard
Posted almost 2 years ago
How to let go of your old/past self
This is definitely not a popular topic for Americans. Two years ago, I more or less was forced to learn how to do it (I did write a book on it, so the details will be skimped here). One of the first things I did was learn to merely observe what goes on in and around me. Not judging, not saying "I am x, y or z." A certain detachment from feelings, thoughts, habits, etc. is necessary. Long story short, I found that the act of simplifying my approach to life made it possible for me to finally come into my own skin. Your inner child is far more important than your past child. The simplest piece of advice I can give you is a little affirmation: "This is where I am, this is what I'm feeling, these are the tools I have, and it's perfectly ok. I do the best with what I have, and I have everything I need in this moment." There are a few reasons I suggest this affirmation, or something similar in your own words. The most difficult thing I had to come to terms with was being human. Somehow, in my endeavor of striving higher and higher to live my full potential and really be the best version of me I possibly could be, I forgot square one. I believed at my core that there were things fundamentally wrong with my existence, based on certain urges, feelings, emotions, beliefs, etc that I was brought up to believe were somehow unholy. Perfect=adequate was my mantra. This affirmation helped me come to terms with being a human animal, and from there realize that as a human, I have the choice to be stuck in the muck of suffering or I could choose resilience, humor, love, trust, etc. I'm just as alive as anyone else, and it's time I be honest with myself, about myself, 100% of the time, I decided. Wish I could write more, as I could go on and on, but I hope this is a good start that gets you thinking. Feel free to message me, ask me any questions. I'm here to help in any way I can. Thanks for exuding the courage to be yourself. :) It does take a lot, but the rewards are infinite.