Ritwick Chatterjee

Delhi / Banglore /chennai /goa, India

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Ritwick Chatterjee
Posted 12 months ago
To what extent can an idea be unique?
Hi Kai, I think I'd like to go into physiology for a bit. we store in our brains in the form of neuronal connections a lot of information. it keeps getting accumulated. sometimes they get destroyed as well. however, an idea in my mind is when a lot of these information gets played around and a new circuit or connection gets formed. that's our eureka moment. now would you say that its unique? In a sense no, because its all due to previous information that we gathered from our environment. but more likely, its a yes. because the information in each of our brains is unique as a whole. it is built from the experiences and thoughts of our lives, which has never been before and never be after. thus a lot of times we are able to come up with similar ideas as other people (because they may have had the same set of info particular to that topic in their storage), and sometimes completely new(by forming a connection never previously made)(this would be rarer) and sometimes we build up on what appears to be someone else's ideas(a mix of both) I hope this was helpful pertaining to your question
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Ritwick Chatterjee
Posted 12 months ago
The other side of mental conditions: Can they have a positive side?
"Normal' is something that cannot be defined. It does not take a higher intellectual power to be better! In medicine, and in science, what you call a 'mental disoder' is still a very unexplored field. We try to define it as something that 'hampers daily life' but that definition is left wide for such a reason. how do you decide what a normal daily life is? something normal to you may seem very abnormal to me and vice versa. Its the same with mental disorders. a normal person lacking in some fields of life can be very good at other things. its the same with handicap. you may see a lot of negative things but, (read carefully and ruminate) at the same time since their brains work in a much different way than a 'normal' person's, they are free from all the biases and stigmas associated it and thus can think in ways that we cannot ever achieve. can this be a good trait? of course!! I leave you with a quote from a roommate while we were studying psychiatric disorders : man, I wish i had mania. is that a wrong statement? its subjective. but after studying mania for a good amount of time, I'd say : sometimes, I wish i had mania too.
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Ritwick Chatterjee
Posted 12 months ago
What is the Public perception on the role of the modern nurse?
Hi Leanne, Maybe this is not the answer you're looking for, but I thought I'd still comment. Im a doctor in India. The topic rings bells for me because I've been thinking around the same lines. This is not about perception, but rather what I think the role of nurses should be in modern healthcare. We have this typical hierarchy in hospitals you would have noticed which goes like: HOD>Senior doctor>junior doctor>Head nurse>nurse>paramedical staff. This is a really archaic system in my mind. there is a spectrum in all of these going from Good to Bad. The patients(and a lot of staff) generally have a view as : doctor - decision maker, Nurse - the caretaker. you may also notice that mostly duties are are divided that way. how i think it should be(for nurses) : if a nurse has been trained and is aware of the correct procedures, their complications and how to manage those, they should be allowed to do those procedures(under observation at first) simply because that would increase the efficiency of the whole team. In emergencies, in case of unavailability of a doctor the nurse should have enough training and expertise to be able to handle it precisely. As a team the doctor and the nurse should be able to double check any parameters that the other checks for better quality control. switching a nurse from a more passive role in the treatment to a more active one, where he/she is able to manage most of the common and simple diseases. the hierarchy should remain because its based on knowledge and experience of a person, however the roles in all of those should overlap considerably. there are legal issues of course, and each country has its own guidelines on what should and shouldnt be done by a nurse, so these may vary. but everybody personalises :) so it depends on you and your doctor to figure it out.