Judy Lee

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Judy Lee
Posted about 1 year ago
How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?
I appreciate your response, Dan Hegerich! Problem you had suffered during early years is the same thing currently happening among the students in South Korea. What you said about teaching students how to live authentically and how to live with others is exactly what I am focusing on right now. What I think is that school should be like a "miniature" of a society. We are supposed to be developing our opinions everyday, cooperating in order to solve difficult problems, and dealing with conflicts we have with friends and teachers. However, most schools are not in this way at all. They only focus on memorizing stuff like new math formula, frankly speaking, obsessed with it. United States as well as South Korea needs to adapt Northern Europe's school system as soon as possible. By adapting I don't mean accomodating everything in Northern Europe, I mean learning lots of things from it. Since all nations have different historical backgrounds and cultural differences, I believe we also need to change some parts and merge with own cultures, although still Northern Europe's education system is great. What is Barach Obama saying about nation's education? Or is he at least mentioning the problem? I heard that Obama mentioned education systems in South Korea and even complimented it, which I as a student in South Korea never understand.
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Judy Lee
Posted about 1 year ago
How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?
I appreciate your thoughts! Your point of view as a citizen in Iran towards the education is quite interesting, since I believe it is very different from the ideas I had gotten from most people. I now get an idea that developing countries are facing this problem of education in a different way. I believe that the problem in your country, Iran, can be solved at least a little by some help from developed countries. You said that people in Iran need to be exposed to some of the new ideas in order to raise their standards. I think this can be done by developed nations since they have new technology, new methods, and new education which we focus on. Since developed countries had undergone the same situation that the developing nations are facing with currently, developed ones can give some new ideas and information to them. This can be done by world's participation such as holding an international conference in terms of understanding the developing countries's situation and offering help. It might prevent civil wars as well. Relating to education, education would be one of the main topics that those conferences would focus on. Constant communication is what I think must be done in the international society, playing a significant role in education revolution as well. Perhaps my idea has gone too far. Although it is not what we as citizens can do right now, it can bring an innovation and revolution to Iran as well as others. What is your opinion?
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Judy Lee
Posted about 1 year ago
How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?
I appreciate your response! You know what, studying from 8 AM to 9 PM is quite an easy life for a teenager in South Korea. Those high school students who want to get into prestigious universities study from 7 AM to 1 AM. Some are even worse, without barely having enough time to sleep. It is because we have private education, almost every student getting it. We also have this exam called 'Su-neung', which totally determinds which universities we go. This is concerned as the most important thing in our lives, every single high school student spending their whole 3 years of high school just preparing for this one test. There is no time for highschool students to develop their abilities nor prepare for future. It seems like all they want from us is to achieve perfect scores on exams. I have seen alot of people from India trying to change the educational system. All you said about India's system is truly right. Although I am in the same situation as those students, I feel sorry for them as well.
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Judy Lee
Posted about 1 year ago
How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?
Thank you for your comment, Everett Hill. You explained the education system in United States very objectively. I guess rich and poor disparity is greatly associated with education, and this is another major problem of world wide education. Here is what is currently happening in South Korea in terms of wealth disparity. In South Korea there is a term called private education, which is creating an unequality for social classes as well. Poor people cannot afford any private learning such as tutoring and academies (We call it 'Hag-won' in Korean) while the rich apparently gains the help from private education due to the financial support from their parents. Schools are teaching math and English in the level of students who already got private education, meaning that those who did not get tutoring nor Hag-won have trouble keeping up with other students. Since math and English are the subjects Korean schools are focused on the most, this is an issue we Koreans can never ignore. Because how much you are paid in Korean society is somewhat determind by what university you had graduated as well as your accomplishments, private education is creating further rich and poor disparity and the pass of wealth from generations. Also, you've mentioned students failing tests, is it related with 'drop out'? I have heard that this was a serious educational issue in United States. I take this quite interesting because in the country where I am from there is barely any drop out, but still having other types of complicated problems.
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Judy Lee
Posted about 1 year ago
How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?
I did not know there were not many clubs nor organizations in Korean universities. Besides, I totally understand what you mean by 'obsessed with SPEC'. This is a problem which must be fixed in Korea, only obsessed with scores and careers, without trying to develop ownself. Korean education is real strange in terms of developing own capability because you do far more hard work in the younger ages, if you know what I mean. You get the most private education and study for exams harder than ever in middle and high school years while in college years you do not study that much. Teenage years should be days getting experiences and trying to figure out what you truly want to do, not being forced into studying. I believe this is associated with the circumstance that some university students still have no idea of what they would do in the future.
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Judy Lee
Posted about 1 year ago
How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?
I greatly appreciate your comments, Jan Hachmann! I had this stereotype that countries in Europe has developed in terms of education systems far more than us. But I was totally shocked by what you informed about German educational system, associating with the problem of unequality. In South Korea there is a term called private education, which is creating an unequality for social classes as well. Poor people cannot afford any private learning such as tutoring and academies (We call it 'Hag-won' in Korean) while the rich apparently gains the help from private education due to the financial support from their parents. Schools are teaching math and English in the level of students who already got private education, meaning that those who did not get tutoring nor Hag-won have trouble keeping up with other students. Since math and English are the subjects Korean schools are focused on the most, this is an issue we Koreans can never ignore. Because how much you are paid in Korean society is somewhat determind by what university you had graduated as well as your accomplishments, private education is creating further rich and poor disparity and the pass of wealth from generations. However, I never knew even a school system is creating a wealth disparity in the other side of the world. This system in Germany should really be fixed as soon as possible.
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Judy Lee
Posted about 1 year ago
How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?
I look forward to discussing with you on educational issues as well as our personal experiences. I believe both email and comments have some advantages and disadvantages. I certainly agree with you on emailing and posting the exchanges of our thoughts afterwards so that others can have access to it. But I think it is still great to write comments because others can participate directly in the shares of our experiences. Perhaps we can learn alot from them as well as from each other. Maybe we can do them both? I would appreciate your opinion.
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Judy Lee
Posted about 1 year ago
How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?
Actually, I am about to turn into 15 (in American age). I am glad that you thought I have a unique way of thinking. I greatly appreciate your comment! According to statistics, South Korea is actually in the first place in terms of educational development. However, I think this is incorrect, because they only meant 'low literacy rate' by educational development. In other words, they did not include how students are forced to only study for their exams nor how students themselves think about the learning system. They did not pay attention to the actual process of the result. If you want to learn more about it, please read the comment just below, a comment to Robit Daniel. It talks about the whole thing behind the education system in South Korea. It starts with "I feel like~." I agree with you that we must figure out how we can start putting all this into practice. We need to create a feasible plan so we can actually eradicate the old education system. Numerous people had thought about it, but nothing really changed. It won't create any changes if we plan to write a petition to the government now. What I think important these days is to gather more and more people who have the same revolutionary ideas with us. Around the world there are lots of educational clubs, NGOs, and other smaller groups. The problem is that those people have no access to one another. I am thinking of creating an online network that will help people to connect and communicate. If this is actually created and is spreaded to the world, we would be able to make the changes that everyone desires.
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Judy Lee
Posted about 1 year ago
How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?
I would love to share experiences with you further! I am not sure though if you can learn a lot from me, since I had far less experiences than you had. However, I still believe that our positions in education can help us to take a look at this problem in broader views. You can tell me how it is to teach a student in this world of education, and I can absolutely tell you how I, as a student, feel about learning. How should we keep in touch? Should we keep replying to each one's comments or use emails?