AUSTIN BUNDY

Omaha, NE, United States

About AUSTIN

Bio

I am a current student studying cognitive psychology. Along with learning and researching about how our brain functions, I consider myself a philosopher of sorts. Much like the TED community I am always asking questions and putting theories to the test.

Areas of Expertise

Political Philosophy, cognitive psychology

Comments & conversations

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AUSTIN BUNDY
Posted almost 2 years ago
Is humanity inherently good or evil?
My apologies if this type of question annoys you. Yet, you still take part in the conversation; perhaps, a bit hypocritical. In my empirical opinion, these types of questions are very healthy. Although a broad question, this question can lead one to many other questions and perhaps personal discoveries. What does it mean to be good? And, by who's standard? Conversely, what does it mean to be evil? You say that it's "obvious that we're both" good and evil. This perspective is very much the same as mine, however, why is it that people are more susceptible to evil when given a certain amount of power or authority? Or, on the opposite spectrum, why do many feel an obligation to help a complete stranger who is in need? You may be intellectually more advanced than others reading this question, but please don't squander the curiosity of others.
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AUSTIN BUNDY
Posted almost 2 years ago
everything that occurs, was always going to occur, and couldn't happen any other way. True or False?
I could reasonably argue both perspectives to this debate. To say that everything that occurs was always going to happen is a perspective held to the degree which leaves no room for personal responsibility. One can easily say that whatever happens tomorrow is going to happen no matter what, but what is it that is going to happen tomorrow? I tend believe this type of thinking to be wrong. Though I may be wrong, I live life feeling like I have power over myself. Rather, there are those who believe this statement to be true compelling them to feel hopeless; for the things will happen regardless of what you do or don't, right? So I continue to live life believing I have power in my decisions.
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AUSTIN BUNDY
Posted almost 2 years ago
Detroit's recent file for bankruptcy: a possible look into the future of what could happen to other cities here in the U.S.
You must have forgotten about the 50 billion dollars GM received in 2009. If that is not a sign that the U.S. lost its ground in the auto industry, I don't know what is. Furthermore, after receiving 50 billion dollars, I'd hope that GM could climb back up the auto industry ladder, and congrats GM found themselves at the very top in 2012. However, even though they have paid nearly all of their debt back to the treasury, the treasury will lose roughly around 11.4 billion dollars through this exchange: through selling their shares they received as payment towards the 50 billion. I couldn't agree more with you when you say "we need a whole new technology for cars."
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AUSTIN BUNDY
Posted almost 2 years ago
Question - Should we make increasing our consciousness as important a topic in schools as the 3 Rs.
Consciousness, in my belief, is something that cannot be taught. Consciousness is discovered by the self. I was never taught how to be a consciously aware being, it just came about as life naturally progressed. We have this innate ability to ask questions, and we do so everyday. Asking yourself questions spawns intellectual thinking, and it just so happens that we all don't ask the same questions. Some are more horizontal with their questions: how can we make this product a better product; others are more vertical questions: is my decision to do something come from my free will or am I hard wired this way. Asking questions can lead you down multiple paths of discovery. I believe a more appropriate agenda would be to teach young ones how to ask questions. Then, naturally guide these students in the right direction so they can ask the RIGHT questions, and conscious awareness will naturally come about.
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AUSTIN BUNDY
Posted almost 2 years ago
Detroit's recent file for bankruptcy: a possible look into the future of what could happen to other cities here in the U.S.
Globally, America has been building the middle class in several countries for decades. At the very same time our middle class here in America has been dwindling. Capitalism, indeed, will migrate to where maximum profit can be obtained, but at what cost? Perhaps, possibly one day the economic clock with tick our way and we might be a nation with no middle class and cheap labor.
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AUSTIN BUNDY
Posted almost 2 years ago
How do you balance living practically, with reaching for your dreams? How much does material gain matter, realistically?
Well from the way you form your question, it seems you have your mind already made up. A life full of excitement and new adventures can be achieved in a "conventional" manner; however, it takes hard work and dedication. Many times I feel that a majority of people today steer away from hard work and dedication or, in other words, "conventional" living. That said, I believe you should take a risk.
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AUSTIN BUNDY
Posted almost 2 years ago
How does aspartame affect our bodies?
Opinions on this subject come from two different perspective, and quite possibly a collaboration of the following. First, after conducting research, one can find aspartame's political history to be quite disturbing. After its discovery, it took a long time for aspartame to hit the shelves. Much effort and political power (Rumsfeld) was need to get the FDA approved for supplemental use. One can only imagine the reason behind strong efforts to get this approved: $$$. Consequently, if one only views aspartame from this perspective it can have a very negative feel. Secondly, chemistry can shed light to aspartame's negative political history. While I am not a chemist, I do still trust science and the truth about the properties of aspartame. We have been consuming aspartame since the the mid 70's, and we have yet to see any detrimental, or even moderate, issues with consumption. One can take either perspective to draw their own conclusions on the subject. Personally, I tend to stay away from artificial sweeteners; I am not a fan of the flavor. However, I believe it is highly important that we look into such products that we consume. There use to be a time when you knew exactly what you were eating; today, many haven't the slightest clue what goes into producing the food they eat. I will continue to stay alert on this issue, for we have not the slightest idea how aspartame affects the body in the long run. After all, one of the many contributing factors to human evolution is our diet and what we choose to consume.