Jennifer Larson

Newark, DE, United States

About Jennifer

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Bio

Hi, I'm Jen and I am almost 49. I grew up in the 70's the best decade, back when kids went outside and played. Good times a plenty. I love to learn from books, other people and living life. I am a thrill seeker and love to go fast. I like science, art, music, sports and games, especially trivia and Scrabble. I still like to play outside. I'm a full-time online student studying Psychology. I served in the Navy, and my oldest of 3 daughters currently serves in Hawaii. I believe in integrity, honor and respect for my fellow humans and environment.

I'm passionate about

Learning something new. Thinking.

Talk to me about

Something fresh.

People don't know I'm good at

Almost everything I put my mind to being good at.

My TED story

My daughter turned me on to TED.

Comments & conversations

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Jennifer Larson
Posted 10 months ago
Civic duty as rite of passage
Hello Steve, Essentially, a rite of passage is a challenge that the child goes through with their peers. One that is intended to instill the values and the skills needed to navigate into adulthood. I merely suggest military but it need not be. It could be any civic type of challenge that is recognized by the local community or country. Have you ever been in the military? Going through boot camp is a perfect example of a rite of passage. The hard mental and physical work is rewarded with acceptance into the fold. Jen
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Jennifer Larson
Posted 10 months ago
Civic duty as rite of passage
Hello Friend, Thank you for your feedback and comments! I agree with your assessment of "rite of passage". To be indoctrinated in the values that formed this more perfect union, first they must fully understand the history of the U.S. and the privileged and responsibility that awaits them as they enter into adulthood. I also concur with your political assessment and hope that learning the many Constitutional revisions, and a deeper understanding of their own particular laws, they may come to realize that the interpretations may or may not sit well with them. They may come to be more of the type of citizens the founders had in mind, and begin to wield their own mighty vote. As I say, forming the program would have to be a private sector endeavor. In time it may become a model for the country. Jen
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Jennifer Larson
Posted 10 months ago
Civic duty as rite of passage
Again, the reply button is not working, but thanks for the question Fritzie. In answer to your question: Jennifer, could I ask what brings you to these issues? Are you a student? It's just something that I have thought about, along with other social issues which contribute to smear our species. I think being a human is an amazing thing, a gift. I think we are awesome and we have the ability to construct or destroy. I chose to think in terms of how to contribute in a meaningful way to our society, to think in terms of improvement for our species while protecting all of the diverse forms that share our planet, as well as the Earth itself. Being the most intelligent of the species infers a special burden to do so in my opinion. Yes to your question, I am a student but a returning student, so I have considered myself an informal student for over 40 years with a strong thirst to obtain knowledge. I am a frequenter of the library from the way back. I worked in a university library for 10 years, going to school was a way to get to research articles which I got addicted to. Standing on the shoulders of giants, full text please :) Have an excellent day! Jen
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Jennifer Larson
Posted 10 months ago
Civic duty as rite of passage
I don't know why the reply is not working but this is for Don's post: I agree and think that ensuring self reliance is a function of education, support from the community and direction to succeed. Jen
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Jennifer Larson
Posted 10 months ago
Civic duty as rite of passage
As an afterthought I would like to add that these kids need to be recognized and appreciated in a meaningful way by leaders in the community, country, an most importantly, their family to complete the rite of passage.
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Jennifer Larson
Posted 10 months ago
What if joining the Peace/Ameri Corps was mandatory in public schools in the United States following graduation of high school?
Hi Tyler, I think mandatory service is an awesome idea. I think limiting the service opportunity is the biggest drawback. I think the mandatory service should address local communities as well. I think the students should be offered a wide range of possible service opportunities that will enable them to focus on not only the service they give but engage them in an activity that will feed into their personal future goals. Jen
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Jennifer Larson
Posted 10 months ago
Civic duty as rite of passage
I would like some opinions on what you think the cons are of year round school, mandatory service (not military, but can be), expanded curriculum and individualized instruction based on aptitude as well as need (such as more tutoring for weak subjects). Because education in America is an increasingly competitive market, I think it's time to make the best school and sell it. If you build it, they will come. If they come, more will be built, if more are built more will benefit :D Jen
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Jennifer Larson
Posted 10 months ago
Civic duty as rite of passage
Thanks for all of your comments! I think that each child is a special individual (and needs to think that). Schools should do more aptitude testing and counseling each student on their results. This could benefit the teachers and the students in formulating direction and future goals. I think students need to have early (and constant) exposure to all subjects including non-academic pursuits such as drama, music, art, technology. When they start high school have individual counseling on what they like, careers related to the interests they have, and then specialized school cur,curriculum for each. I think mandatory service should play into this. I am also for year round schooling with many more opportunities to engage in group activities (like sports, camps for extracurricular or academic, and learning by visiting interesting or educational sites as well as biology/environmental hands on learning classrooms outside!). It's Adam Smith economics! specialization works because each is special with their individual ability and propensity. We should capitalize on our greatest resource: our children. To do this we need to invest in them and give them the structure and well rounded experience of healthy, connected learning that promotes diverse interaction and experiences. This is how I wish my school was, not just a grist-mill churning out dis-interested, unattached and adrift teens, We have an innate ability and desire to learn, we have a psychological need to connect and contribute. Knowing that should prompt educational reforms that make sense in our post-agricultural society. I LOVE America (and the whole Earth) and think it's worth doing more, becoming more, and achieving more. Happy 4th to all U.S.A. citizens and those who share the ideals of freedom -Jen (who wanted to serve with pride and did U.S.N. '88)