Austin Williams

Battle Ground, WA, United States

About Austin

An idea worth spreading

Teaching emotional intelligence (EI) in schools may reduce both school bullying and teen suicides. And teaching EI in parenting classes may reduce divorce rates. Both intrapersonal, and interpersonal skills. Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to know and manage one's emotions, empathize with others, and maintain satisfying relationships. Intrapersonal, being the ability to know and manage one's emotions. And interpersonal, being able to empathize with others, and maintain satisfying relationships. Not enough room here to fully explain the idea.

I'm passionate about

Helping people think critically, manage their emotions. I'd like to see people be more creative, rather than just copying everything around them. I want to find a way to teach creative thinking.

Talk to me about

I've taken a couple "emotional intelligence" (EI) classes, and I'm currently taking psychology.

People don't know I'm good at

critical, deep, philosophical, creative, and sometimes poetic thinking. And I do a lot of writing on those thoughts and ideas. Empathizing with others and giving advice with their emotions.

Comments & conversations

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Austin Williams
Posted 9 months ago
Free will is circular reasoning
Here's what part of my opinion that will fit in the number of characters I can use: Free will is a conscious choice. But do we choose to be conscious? We are conscious when we are born, do we choose that? We have many unconscious reflexes to external factors, so what if consciousness is a conscious reflex? We don't have an internal choice unless there are external options. Do you have free will if you aren't given an option? If free will comes from ourselves, then is free will something we ourselves created? Or is free will given to us, and therefore is not our own, from ourselves? When you make sense of something, you make rules and laws. If there's no laws or structure, it doesn't make sense. You can't make sense of freedom, because there are no rules in freedom. Can you make sense of free will? Does free will have laws? Does free will have structure? Free will would also mean that your choices can't be determined (I don't 100% agree with these people) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFLR5vNKiSw. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4l1lQMCOguw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4C5pq7W5yRM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCwY36a19aQ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMp30Q8OGOE If quantum mechanics says we have free will because of uncertainty, and the measurement is dependent on the observer, whether it is a partial or energy, does that mean free will determines how we view and perceive the world? Does free will determine perception? If free will means your actions aren't determined, how can you determine that we have free will? Is the fact that we still don't know (it's undetermined) if we have free will the evidence for it? Is not knowing if we have free will what makes us have free will? If you look inside yourself, you have free will. If you look outside yourself, you don't. If you believe inside your own thoughts "mind over matter" you are internally overpowering external applications. If you look around at the external applications, you'll just respond to them
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Austin Williams
Posted 9 months ago
Free will is circular reasoning
Free will: the power of making free choices unconstrained by external factors. Choice: the act of choosing or selecting. Choose: pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives. Select: pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives. Pick out: pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives. These are the definitions given to me by a dictionary app by Clatin Software, LLC They all define each other according to these definitions. And this is one area I where see circular reasoning.
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Austin Williams
Posted 9 months ago
Free will is circular reasoning
Yes, that would be true. I observed(A) it because it exists(B). It exists(B) because I observed(A) it. I believe(A) it because it is true(B). It is true(B) because I believe(A) it. I have free will(A) because I have the ability to choose(B). I have the ability to choose(B) because I have free will(A). But I also think that it's circular reasoning because we can't think beyond or outside of consciousness, observations, or outside of our free will, so we therefore cannot find anything past it to break this circle. So the idea is that all consciousness is circular, but it is only circular because we cannot think or observe outside of our own consciousness.
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Austin Williams
Posted 12 months ago
What are the difficulties of being an extrovert?
Yes, there is that situation ambiversion.I don't think anyone is entirely one or the other, but we all lean towards one side of extroversion or introversion more often than the other. I'm just asking about when the extroversion side of the spectrum is being leaned on more.
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Austin Williams
Posted 12 months ago
What are the difficulties of being an extrovert?
Yes, with the "introverted extroverts and extroverted introverts" I would say that no one is entirely introverted or extroverted. Such a person would be considered to have some sort of mental disorder. But we all lean towards one side more than the other.
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Austin Williams
Posted about 1 year ago
Is Philosophy dead?
Before we had the word "science" the people who did the same work and studies as modern scientists were called "natural philosophers". Scientists do ponder about their findings. They find one thing, and another, then ponder on what new conclusions they can come to after learning their current conclusions, and develop a theory. If finding A is true, and finding B is true, then what is the logical C theory, based on A and B?
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Austin Williams
Posted about 1 year ago
In school can, and should, "Emotional Intelligence" be taught?
Yes, I can see how the behavior of the teachers would affect how kids learn EQ. I had the benefit of choosing the highest rated professors for my college EQ classes. They were very kind and respectful to their students, and very enthusiastic. But if I were to have had a boring, apathetic teacher, or and angry, disrespectful teacher, that probably would have an effect on how I took in these EQ skills. Because they're skills that we use all the time. And how they see the person teaching them about it uses them, that would affect how the students use the skills. So the teachers would probably need some learning too.
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Austin Williams
Posted about 1 year ago
In school can, and should, "Emotional Intelligence" be taught?
I don't think that teaching these skills would go against what a child's parent teaches them. I think that having EQ taught in schools would actually get kids to consider their parents life lessons even more than they do now. That teaching EQ would help kids to be less apathetic towards their parents. Not going against parenting, but actually strengthening the relationships between kids and their parents. Because EQ involves questioning your own thoughts, vs. questioning others. For example, one thing I learned in one of my college EQ classes for managing your emotions is to ask yourself "Does feeling this way help the situation?" It doesn't involve criticizing other people (such as your own parents), it's quite the opposite. It's being critical of yourself in a reasonable way. It doesn't teach, "this is right, and that is wrong." It teaches more along the lines of getting you to ask yourself "Is this right, and is that wrong? And why do I believe that? And do I have good reason to believe that?" Because of this, I personally, would like to see it as at least an option in schools. But whether or not it should be a requirement, I'd like to see it be a requirement, just because I see no downfalls in it. But I can see that many kids wouldn't want to have another requirement to take in school, and parents that many parents would have the misconception that teaching EQ would make kids rebel against their parents. But from what I learned in my EQ class, I think that kids would, on the contrary, be more obedient to their parents.
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Austin Williams
Posted about 1 year ago
In school can, and should, "Emotional Intelligence" be taught?
I have come up with a theory that teaching interpersonal skills to kids early in life will reduce bullying in schools. We can't be around the kids all the time to control them. But they are under the most control is in classes. And interpersonal skills are the “empathize with others, and maintain satisfying relationships” part of EQ. Although, I learned these EQ concepts in college. So I do not know how early they will be able to learn and understand the concepts of EQ in their young minds. And bullying happens at very young ages. I think they would be able to understand the concepts of EI in their early teens years, which would also be a good time to have EQ fresh in their minds, because intrapersonal skills is the other part of EQ, which involves understanding one’s own emotions. And in our teen years is when we are trying to find our identity, who we are, and where (or if) we fit in, and what we want to do with our future lives; which is a lot of complicated and confusing stuff to think about. So this could also reduce teen suicides. Because they would better be able to think about their own emotions, and therefore, their confusing and suicidal thoughts. And suicidal people often don't say anything about their suicidal thoughts, so intrapersonal skills (able to manage one’s own emotions) would help them to think more clearly about what they won’t share with others. And for the kids who can't yet grasp these EQ concepts, we could have EQ taught in parenting classes for parent who choose to take them. So they can help their kids to manage their own emotions, and empathize with others. So, in short, teaching kids intrapersonal skills will reduce suicides, and interpersonal skills will reduce bullying and abuse in schools. And I also think we would have less road rage if we had EQ taught before learning to drive.