Chirayu Sariya

Mumbai / Bombay, India

About Chirayu

Languages

English, French, Hindi

I'm passionate about

Learning. Traveling.

Talk to me about

Your travels, experiences, politics, economy, education, environment, religion or just what drives you..

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

167835
Chirayu Sariya
Posted over 2 years ago
José Bowen: Beethoven the businessman
The way I see it, Music is kind of going back to its original form - folk music - music by and of the common people. Only with changed genres (styles) of music production. Making music is probably as easy than it ever has been. Great accessibility to music instruments, with softwares like Garageband, Logic, Ableton and so many apps for devices that are in themselves almost a complete studio, given some extra inexpensive hardware. Learning music has been completely transformed too - I am a self-taught musician too, and learnt music through books, magazines and email-newsletters. This was even before YouTube, and now there is YouTube. With a million people sharing there techniques and styles and beginner to advanced lessons! In the older times, every small community would have a musician of their own and as José described, it was a social event. Not much different right now, with music being omnipresent at all social functions - parties, events, weddings etc. So how will the average musician make money? My guess is distributing their recorded work as promotional material for their concerts, or crowd-funding the album. But a major part of revenue for most might be in live shows and music festivals. The genius would always survive.
167835
Chirayu Sariya
Posted over 3 years ago
Refuting a quantum mechanics theory
There is a slight problem with your theory. The very idea that there be parallel universes for every other possible outcome of each and every experiment (if you believe this) arouse out of our inability to choose the outcome that will be part of "our" universe. To simply describe what I'm saying here, consider the universe in 4 stages. Say, at every stage an event forces the universe to 'split' into two parallel universes, each for the two possible outcomes of that event. Now at the first stage (after the first event) we have universes u1 and u2. At the 2nd stage, you will have universe u11,u12,u21 and u22. For both universes split further with the second event that produces two possible outcomes This will continue till we have on the 4th stage - u1111, u1112, u1121, u1122, u1211, u1212....and so on. A total of 2^4=16 universes! Imagine the number of quantum events that must be taking place - Zillions in a single second in a very small space! Multiply that with the amount of time passed since the Big Bang and the total space in the Universe (lazily assuming uniform distribution of particles and events), you'll get an approximate number of parallel universes created since then, AND the number of possible outcomes that each of those events had. With no way to know how which outcome was "our" universe. So, to answer your question, there is not a single way that the space-time can unfold, but a multitude of ways! This is because every cause does not have a single effect, but multiple possibilities as effects.
167835
Chirayu Sariya
Posted over 4 years ago
Derek Sivers: Keep your goals to yourself
..!! Thats exactly what I've been advocating since a long time now. I feel robbed :( An excerpt from a conversation with a friend about 2 years back.. (please excuse the no-editing) "Its about concentrating your desire and want and need. When you talk about something you very dearly want, it is bound to bring you joy. That can not be argued. And that's when that little joy corrupts your desire to achieve it, and however it only satisfies a fraction of your mind, it can never satisfy your soul. It is like rust, it weakens the foundation. Its like dividing the whole meal into a small unworthy portion to satisfy your apetite so that you can go a little further in life without having to work for food. You don't feel as hungry anymore and you can go on, as the emergency has died, the drive dies." So, I agree with Derek Sivers.
167835
Chirayu Sariya
Posted over 4 years ago
Diane J. Savino: The case for same-sex marriage
I agree with you on 4 & 5. I do not oppose the right of individuals to be gay, but celebrating it or publicly demonstrating is found offensive by most others for several reasons. But that brings us to the issue of wether gay marriage is to be considered a 'right' or 'a celebration and a public announcement'. It seems it is both.
167835
Chirayu Sariya
Posted over 4 years ago
Diane J. Savino: The case for same-sex marriage
Thanks for your post. I find it convincing for the most part. You are right and I must admit that I am one of those you mentioned who have some fear of the unknown. I have not personally met a real gay person and where I live, one's (homo)sexuality is not openly discussed or announced, therefore these questions. However I'm still not convinced that seeing 2 men kiss each other in public will not affect a child's thoughts about what he himself will find acceptable regarding his own sexual behavior, later in life.. Even little events in our early childhood have a very deep impact on the psyche. Not to say that being gay is wrong (to each his own, with all respect) , but is it the first choice of sexuality that we would want our children to have in their minds? PS. These are honest questions I pose, and do not intend to offend anyone. But I'd like to know people's thoughts about this.
167835
Chirayu Sariya
Posted over 4 years ago
Diane J. Savino: The case for same-sex marriage
She presents a wonderful argument. But what I don't understand, and personally consider important points regarding this issue are - 1. What makes homosexuality right or wrong? 2. Is it unnatural (or inconsequential in an evolutionary way)? Does that even matter? 3. Is it a result of undesired individual experiences? 4. Is it a result of personal/social psychological issues, or does it have to do anything with our current lifestyles/technologies/media? 5. What impact does it have on the society (especially children) to make such acts publicly acceptable (or punishable)? I may be wrong to ask some of these questions, but they bug me nonetheless. Also, on a side note, why can't I track other people's replies to my posts on TED?