Kai Demandante

About Kai

I'm passionate about

Learning. Engineering. Technology. Education. Design.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

189481
Kai Demandante
Posted about 1 year ago
Racism in United States: Is it alive and well or is it not?
I think racism is alive, but it's a natural thing to have. I think people will always be preferential towards people that are similar to themselves and their family. Coming from a biracial family, I have an innate preference toward people from my two ethnicities. That doesn't mean I hate all others, but it means there is a basic lack of chemistry (for lack of a better word) between me and a black person for instance. Or me and a woman. There a basic differences that make it harder for me to relate and empathize with certain types of people.
189481
Kai Demandante
Posted about 1 year ago
Do we need to be a little selfish to be happy?
I think our happiness is derived from internal and external satisfactions. We all have expectations of ourselves and if they are not filled, it is hard to be happy. Likewise, we have expectations of others and if they are not filled, it is hard to be happy.
189481
Kai Demandante
Posted over 1 year ago
Who are you? How do you define yourself?
Just posted a blog post on this today (been having some teenage "identity issues" recently)... here's pertaining excerpts: "Luckily, I think I know my identity now. As I have thought recently, it is not defined. I can't say exactly who I am, who I want to be, or who I was. My identity is an accumulation. It is shaped by my past. It will be shaped by my future. It is being shaped as I write this post." "The best way I could tell someone who I am... is by [having] a two part biography with the first part being written by people who have had made repeated impacts on my thought process in my life and and the second part being autobiographical, and including all my thoughts and actions. Obviously this is a purely theoretical work, but theory helps establish truths." Thanks for the question and hopefully that helped!
189481
Kai Demandante
Posted over 1 year ago
What is behind competition? Does competition influence the behavior of people in a negative way?
I think the drive behind competition is the want to do well and separate yourself from others. We all want to succeed, but our measures of success vary. I think competition allows some people a clear goal. Win or lose. Work hard and you can 'win', work not so hard and you can 'lose'. Our definitions of winning and losing vary as well. But to sum up, what is "behind" competition is the want to do well and be acknowledged for your efforts. I think competition is fine, but sometimes is taken too far for some people. You should not want to 'win' to such an extent that your actions do more harm than good. In regards to the Olympics, I personally think (and have expressed in a blog post) they should be watched not as people competing for different countries, but people competing for the love of the game.
189481
Kai Demandante
Posted over 1 year ago
Does your perception of time change as you age?
It depends on how I am using my time but in general, time increments should seems shorter as people age. For example, when you are one, one year is your whole life. When you are fifty, one year is 1/50th of your life. This goes with all time increments. Also, it seems that our memory of time is much different than when we are actually perceiving it go by.
189481
Kai Demandante
Posted over 1 year ago
If you could know the definitive, true answer to any question you could conceive, what would you ask and why?
Oh sorry I didn't mean to imply that our world follows strict rules and guidelines that cannot be altered, but rather to provide a way of explaining what I actually mean (which is in the description). I wanted to see if there was any question that you guys thought was the most important in finding out and why. Thanks for the comment, though! I will rephrase it now.
189481
Kai Demandante
Posted over 1 year ago
Why is it that against all odds we still hope? Is this a good thing or a bad thing?
I'd say hope is a good thing. Hope about unsolved problems leads to innovations and solutions. Hope about someone's condition leads to optimism in you and will most likely transfer to the person with the illness, which should help them in their possible last moments. Now that I've written those examples actually, I'd say that hope *and* action is a good things, but hope without action is a bad thing. Hope should hopefully (no pun or whatever intended) lead us to action which will produce results (some of the time), but if hope is thought of more as a crutch, a reason for inactivity, it will not produce any positive results. Thanks for the question!
189481
Kai Demandante
Posted over 1 year ago
How does one find his/her passion?
Hello fellow senior! I have struggled with the same problem, but am not worried. I think we will find our passion by trying out different things. I think my passion lies somewhere in the STEM field (more specifically engineering), but once I take more classes within that broad field I think I will find my niche (word choice?). I found my passion because of internal and external feedback. I have always liked my science, technology, mathematics, and most recently engineering classes; and I have also received positive feedback from teachers (and students) within these subjects. If you don't have a particular subject where this is the case, still don't worry. Just do what you like. This sounds really simple, but I think most truths are simple. Do what you like and pursue this interest until you don't like it anymore (not because of diminishing returns, but because it really doesn't interest you anymore for whatever reason). If you find something in which you never get bored no matter how entrenched you are in it, that is your passion (or at least one of them). Sorry if that was too 'stream-of-conscious"y and I hope that helped! Feel free to ask questions or give comments (
189481
Kai Demandante
Posted over 1 year ago
Will science ever tell us everything there is to know?
Before I address the question head on, I would like to first note that I don't think we "know" anything about the world around us. While we might observe that certain things act in certain ways and may attribute certain equations to describe how these things act (force equals mass times acceleration for instance), we do not *know* if this is how it actually works. We are simply assigning numbers to reality in the hopes of understanding reality better. I don't think we will ever actually know something, as their is no absolute authority (like a creator) that we can contact (now if we could contact this hypothetical being that would be interesting (looks for an upcoming post :))). With that said, I can still address the heart of the question. I think there is a point (whether we reach it or not doesn't matter) in which everything about our world (world being a much broader sense than Earth) will be somehow observed and explained in someway. I think one of the things this question is really asking is if there is a finite or an infinite amount of knowledge in our world (ignoring the tools to getting to this point (science being the tool mentioned in the question)). I think there is a finite amount of things to learn about the world (sort of related to if our world (or universe) is infinite or not). While we may be having a trend of "infinite divisibility", like the positivist nullifidian mentioned below, I think that our finite potential knowledge is integer-like. In that while we may be reaching an 'asymptote', once we reach that asymptote it will just take learning about the one thing left to finally 'know' everything about our world. Okay that metaphor might not have been well communicated, but hopefully the idea was sort of expressed, if not please reply. Also, if you have any thoughts about this^ you are encouraged share. Thanks for the question!
189481
Kai Demandante
Posted over 1 year ago
What is the future of entertainment?
I think some entertainment touches humans at such a basic level that it will always be entertaining. For example, while there is some comedy that is very "current event"-based, some comedy (usually the observational kind) can relate to almost any human (at least in a certain demographic). This goes with any other form of entertainment. Let's use the example of music. Classical music is probably considered good today because of its usage of fundamentally sound techniques that any artist or critic can recognize. However songs like "Last Friday Night" and "Blurred Lines" or just much of popular music today, will probably look hilarious to future generations. I would write more and may edit later, but I've got less than a minute on this library computer before it logs me out. Thank you for the question! I recently thought about entertainment and its purpose besides entertaining, so I was ready to say something about entertainment.