Bob Lewis

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Bob Lewis
Posted 7 months ago
Peter Singer: The why and how of effective altruism
Priyanka, I would agree with much of what you said. If you want to look into the investments that help to fund the Gates philanthropy you'll find the same thing. I wouldn't write him off as much as you did - although I was surprised that someone with his philosophical credentials hadn't probed his own ideas a little more deeply. However, if you want to see shallow and patronizing, watch Melinda Gates saying how charities could learn so much from Coca Cola. There are still a lot of really wonderful and inspiring TED talks, but increasingly I'm seeing, if not actual dreck, then at least talks that were too short and weren't really well thought out. I give money to various anti-business and anti-government organizations and I give money directly to street people.
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Bob Lewis
Posted 7 months ago
Aimee Mullins: The opportunity of adversity
I haven't read ALL the comments so maybe this is repetition. Joseph Campbell! Myths to Live By, Man the Myth maker and other books. He explains about myths and heroes. The mythological hero starts out as a relatively ordinary person, but then is faced with a challenge. If she - or he - can overcome it - do the right thing - remain pure of heart in spite of temptation - in the process of doing all this, they enter a magical world. Paradigm Shift. Their world changes. They change. When it's all over, they come back to the ordinary world and resume their ordinary life - but with a new vision of what it is all about, a new appreciation of their life and the world around them.. Adversity, challenges, misfortune - whatever you call these things - with the right attitude, they are not negative events - they are opportunities to learn great spiritual lessons and become a much better person. Also, if you approach them with that attitude, they are a lot easier to deal with - you can actually wake up in the morning anxious to confront them yet again.
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Bob Lewis
Posted 8 months ago
Wingham Rowan: A new kind of job market
A bit further down this page, Vladimir Lobonov posted this link to a British tv program about how a similar program has worked. Disaster to the employees. Big surprise. Worth watching - not a theory- this is what REALLY happens. http://youtu.be/MI5wN78y8z8 I also have to note the naivite of the speaker - talking about the prime minister or president worrying about how to do the best for the population. Only during the week before an election - and then with no intention of actually doing it. Sorry. Big business puts in the money to run the election campaign and they want fairly high unemployment because then people will be willing to take jobs at minimum wage for a couple of hours when they are needed. And then he talks about the wonderful success of the national lotteries - the modern version of bread and circuses. Most folks really have no hope of improving their lot so the lottery helps to keep them from fully realizing how hopeless their situation is. The well off spend much less than the poor on lotteries. Not as a percentage of income, but fewer dollars per person. For the wealthy it's just a pleasant game. For the poor it's their only hope. I had a small country store once - trying everything to make it successful - including lottery tickets. Once I began to see how much poor people were spending on the tickets I stopped selling them. Every store you go into - right there on the counter. It's money for the government and for all the businesses involved, and the poor pay. Sorry - There are some really nice ideas here, but I don't think the speaker is really aware of the reality of how government and business work - of the level of greed and corruption that are involved. Note that we are generally referred to, not as citizens, but as consumers. It is rare that business or government give any more than token consideration to the public.
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Bob Lewis
Posted 8 months ago
Wingham Rowan: A new kind of job market
6:03 - "For benefit of all of us..." It will only be done for the benefit of the corporations. If WE benefit at all, it will be just by chance. In Canada, many companies hire part time almost exclusively, so that they can avoid paying benefits and can eliminate any sense of jub security. Starbucks - who made a big deal when they started, of being caring about employees, now has their busyness forcasting so efficient that they can have someone come in for 2 hours at 7 am and two more at 4pm... and who cares if they guy barely makes enough to cover his bus fare to work and back? It's a nice idea, but it will be used AGAINST the workers. We are disposable. I had a friend who had 3 part-time jobs. One day, at one of them, her boss casually mentioned that her shift for the next day had been changed. She said she had another job at that time. He just shrugged. "There or here - doesn't matter - a dozen people a day come in looking for work." I have been a huge fan of TED, but I keep finding more and more of these talks just haven't been thought through. A significant lack of depth.
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Bob Lewis
Posted 9 months ago
Benjamin Barber: Why mayors should rule the world
Lots of good ideas - especially about the Party systems, but the analogies don't really carry after that. You can be a homey in Philly or Toronto, but you can't in Washington. I like the 'anarcho-' part. A lot of the rest of it is wishful thinking. I'm from Canada.Let me say, Joe Fontana mayor of London Ontario. He's been awaiting trial on fraud charges for many months now. Admittedly, he used to be a member of the federal Liberal Party. Let me say Rob Ford of Toronto. The US has a more than a few mayors who are even worse. I thought this talk was mostly wishful thinking with far too little basis in reality. It's still a patriarchal system he's talking about. The needed changes are far bigger than this.
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Bob Lewis
Posted 9 months ago
Suzanne Talhouk: Don't kill your language
I'm horrified at how many TED people have such provincial ideas. Languages aren't just a bunch of different words for the same things. Each language is the spoken and written face of a culture. Each culture is different. Each culture is, in effect, a different reality. Here in Canada we have two official languages - French and English. I have often heard people complain about having French 'shoved down our throats.' Why do they think this? I've always admired people who can speak more than one language. I've met quite a few people who speak several languages. I have NEVER met anyone who complained about knowing more than one language. NEVER. A second language gives you access to a different way of thinking - a different way of seeing the world. I think this is a valuable and important skill. And the more different the language, the more different the culture, the more valuable it is to have a second language. At school, English was not my best subject. Math was. I loved geometry and algebra. I don't know how to write it in Arabic, and we are so used to the word, we seldom think of it's origin - al-gebra. We got it from the Arab countries who were scientists and mathematicians and astronomers when Europe was in the dark ages. English is so widely known and used that it makes some sense to accept it as the international language, but I think that, ideally, it should be a SECOND language. People who give up their native language and replace it with English don't realize how much they have given up. The price is much too high.
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Bob Lewis
Posted 10 months ago
Paul Piff: Does money make you mean?
I think you have to take into account that many of those 'middle class' Americans are living in fear of falling into the lower class/unemployed category. They are also subjected to a lot of very clever propaganda telling them that it's the immigrants who are stealing their jobs and bleeding the government. Scapegoating the immigrant to distract the middle and lower classes from the 1% who are the real cause of their suffering.
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Bob Lewis
Posted 10 months ago
Amanda Palmer: The art of asking
People complain about her $1.2 million funding ... Bono LOST 140 MILLION DOLLARS on a single investment. (Palm/Elevation Partners) Just part of his portfolio. He isn't broke. And I've seen the full page colour ads on the back of the economist magazine - Bono standing on the African Veldt, his private plane in the background, his Louis Vitton luggage next to him... What was he paid for that? Now, about Amanda's 1.2 mil - to fund a project - she didn't just keep it. For me, she is Amanda Fucking "A" Palmer. She rocks. She rules!
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Bob Lewis
Posted 11 months ago
Jenna McCarthy: What you don't know about marriage
Think about it Melissa... Jenna says - and it sounds reasonable - that if a man willingly contributes to the housework, his wife will feel more affectionate towards him and is more likely to have good sex with him. OTOH, if she follows your suggestion and initiates really great sex, what is the chance her husband will think, "Damn - that was good. I think I'll go start the dishwasher, put a load of laundry in and then clean the toilet."? Or will he think, "Wow - I must be hot. She's obviously happy the way things are." and rolls over and goes to sleep?
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Bob Lewis
Posted 11 months ago
Melinda French Gates: What nonprofits can learn from Coca-Cola
Hi Oli, If you google 'coke union busting' you'll get lots of links. You can then decide which are the more reliable sources. If you search 'coke third world' you'll get another pile of information. With the internet, the only limits are time and your ability to sort for qulity of intormation. Good luck. Bob