Rodney Wilson

Someone is shy

Rodney hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

Noface
Rodney Wilson
Posted about 1 year ago
Is it time for philosophy to do away with metaphysics?
Ben: notification of your response did not show up in my email. I found this message of yours just by chance. You can find some of the evidence in my website at www.roseandlotus.net. You can find more at www.victorzammit.com. But you can find more by doing your own searching, rather than requiring others to spoonfeed you. Sceptics like to decry the evidence, but that is all that they can do. They are unable to discount it. Often they can speculate about alternative explanations for part of a phenomenon, and loudly trumpet that they have "debunked" the entire phenomenon, but offer no evidence that their speculation is what actually happened, Yet they demand absolute proof of the reality of the phenomena in question. Science very rarely offers absolute proof of anything. The sceptical decrying is based purely on the prejudice of the sceptics, and their emotional need to hang on to their own unprovable theories about how reality works. And it is the sceptics who do the cherry-picking of the evidence. They find only the cases that seem easy to explain away, and concentrate on those, claiming thus to have explained everything away. People who actually look at the whole of the evidence generally cease to be sceptics. If you are sufficiently interested, there is an excellent 5-part series of talks about the nature of reality by the physicist Thomas Campbell, in which, among other things, he outlines the relationship between physics and metaphysics. Part 1 is found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruc83Vau1jc Randi has not shown that he has the money. He sets himself up as the sole judge, jury and executioner, and he can, and does, shift the goalposts to suit himself, and ensure that he never has to pay out. He is a professional illusionist, he specialises in illusions, and is good at making things appear the way that he wants. His million-dollar offer is just part of his portfolio of illusions. Zammit's million dollar offer is much more solidly based.
Noface
Rodney Wilson
Posted about 1 year ago
Is it time for philosophy to do away with metaphysics?
Actuallly, there is a lot of evidence to support metaphysical ideas. It is a myth, loudly promulgated by skeptics, that there is no evidence. But there is a lot of evidence. Do an online search for 'reincarnation evidence" or "afterlife evidence", or anything similar, and you will find some of it. Victor Zammit (easily discoverable online) has published a good summary of the evidence available, and offered a million dollar reward to anybody who can disprove that evidence. Unlike James Randi's much ballyhooed but illusory million dollar offer, Zammit has actually produced the money, and is willing to have a final decision decided by an independent arbiter. So far, nobody has been willing even to try for it. The evidence is too strong.
Noface
Rodney Wilson
Posted about 1 year ago
Is it time for philosophy to do away with metaphysics?
There have been occasions when contacts have been shown to be fraudulent, but that does not mean that they all are, just as the existence of dud cheques is not taken as "proof" that all cheques are faked. There are many investigations of out-of-body experiences occurring during surgery that have not been shown ot be imaginary, and investigators of such phenomena, such as Dr Pim van Lommel, and Dr Jeffrey Long, who tried to prove them to be mere hallucinations have instead become convinced of their reality and are now well respected proponents of that idea, having published solid research in support. You can find them on Google or Youtube. Where, or whose, is the research that you refer to? Sceptics, such as Shermer, repeatedly show themselves to be unfamiliar with most of the research data, but very familiar with their own dogma. For one example (out of many) of evidence for metaphysical ideas, you could watch the video at http://www.youtube.com/v/hfVUZAgfUXE (it runs for about an hour). I can find many different forms of evidence for the reality of the afterlife and none to show that the idea is false. I can find a lot of scorn heaped on the idea, by dogmatic deniers, but no actual evidence against it. Metaphysics is based on such evidence, whereas those who claim to be science-based are often surprised, when they really check it out, to find that the idea of the material-only universe is more of a philosophical, and often dogmatic, construct than an evidence-based viewpoint. As I have indicated in previous posts, therefore, it would be premature now to throw out evidence-based metaphysics and replace it with mere scientific-sounding speculation based purely on a lack of scientific evidence.
Noface
Rodney Wilson
Posted about 1 year ago
Is it time for philosophy to do away with metaphysics?
Hi, Orlando: There is nothing wrong with your attitude. There is so much that is still unknown about the nature of life that nobody is in a position to say that he or she has the complete truth, however much people from all different persuasions may like to claim so. And that is the point in this discussion. There are people who are convinced that science alone can explain life, even though it has no idea yet what consciousness is or how it may work. And that is why it would be premature to throw metaphysics out just yet, when there is so much that is not definitely known. Metaphysics is an attempt to get a handle on questions that are very important to people: What will become of me when I die? What has happened to my grandma/father/brother/child/(etc.) whom I love dearly, but who is no longer in this world? Some people have made contacts with such departed loved ones, through their own dreams or meditations, or through spirit mediums or the like, which are absolutely convincing to them, although perhaps less convincing to onlookers. Those people are able to put aside the deep sense of loss that they may have felt at the time of the person's death. Nobody is in a position to say that those people are wrong or deluded, and nobody is in a position to say, definitely, that they are all factually correct. The people themselves may be certain, and there the certainty ends. But there are people on both sides of the argument who are convinced that they are right, and that it is their duty to shout down anybody who disagrees. Science has no idea how consciousness, or life, can have arisen from inert matter. It cannot even begin to say how the inert matter itself came into being in the first place, apart from referring to an inexplicable "Big Bang". So, we resort to metaphysics to try and understand such questions. Whether we do so rightly or wrongly, we cannot definitely say, but it is better to try to understand them than to pretend that such questions do not exist.
Noface
Rodney Wilson
Posted about 1 year ago
Is it time for philosophy to do away with metaphysics?
Being able to reproduce it with ketamine does nothing to explain what actually happens. The people who experience it with ketamine also come back knowing that death is only an illusion. They can also meet dead relatives, and experience the enhanced clarity of vision and thought that is so often reported when the brain stops functioning. It seems, therefore, that ketamine can temporarily (and dangerously) loosen one's relationship with one's body.
Noface
Rodney Wilson
Posted about 1 year ago
Is it time for philosophy to do away with metaphysics?
Actually, metaphysics was developed in order to explain some actual phenomena. To regard it as something totaly lacking evidence displays some ignorance. The evidence and phenomena are found in the areas of near-death visions, near-death experiences (NDE's), afterlife communications (of various kinds), memories (especially by children) of former lives, and so on. All of these, and related phenomena, ask questions that cannot be answered in materialist science, and which metaphysics offers some possible answers for. So-called sceptics like to pooh-pooh these phenomena, but they cannot explein them all away (despite strenuous attempts to do so), and nor can they produce any evidence to demonstrate that they must be false. It would therefore be somewhat premature to ditch the whole field of metaphysics.