Brage Gording

Stavanger, Norway

About Brage

Languages

English, Norwegian

Areas of Expertise

Physics

I'm passionate about

Any areas of science in general but physics in particular. I also am very passionate about the exploration of space, and our advancement into it.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

194492
Brage Gording
Posted over 1 year ago
Gian Giudice: Why our universe might exist on a knife-edge
While I do understand where you are coming from I believe you are slightly misguided. Why is a question we ask in order to understand what is actually happening, the best example being possibly the first why question of physics: Newton's "If and apple falls to the Earth, why doesn't the moon fall as well?". The beauty of why questions is that they allow us to figure out what is really going on, and then we can exploit this knowledge to create new technological wonders, like satellites, which would not work without Einstein's theory of relativity. As for the fine tuned argument you are not alone, but let me try and persuade you. If any of the physical constants had any other value we would not be able to exist. That is the very constituents of our bodies would not work, and we would never even have been an option of evolution. Indeed, this is true for all life as we know it, the key here being "as we know it". Other constants could possibly allow for other "life", but it would not even remotely resemble anything which you have seen or even thought of (probably, I can't read your mind). So now we as WHY? Why are the constants the way they are? Why aren't they just a fraction of a fraction different, why so precise? One method of trying to solve this is trying to use the equations of physics to find the answer. Like Maxwell did when he found that the speed of light was a result of the permittivity and permeability of the medium. In empty space this means the speed of light must be constant, but it will travel more slowly through air or glass for example. But this only defines one constant in terms of others, not why the constant is. So when theories pop up that predict multiple universes, with the possibility that these constants are different in them, we say MAYBE the reason they are so precise is because if not we simply would not exist, and that there are other universes with vastly different constants, I do hope my rambling has helped, thanks for reading.
194492
Brage Gording
Posted almost 2 years ago
Conrad Wolfram: Teaching kids real math with computers
That's of course true, but I think it much more important to emphasise that 7^3 is 7*7*7. Then it is evident that 5*7^3 and (5*7)^3 must be two different quantities. If you explain the mathematics well enough there should be no need for a mandated "order of operations", which is only needed if you have a machine which cannot think for itself..
194492
Brage Gording
Posted about 2 years ago
Technology becoming part of people, and artificially bettering ourselves
In the beginning this will only be available to the rich, as new technologies are very expensive, but just as it cost 10K USD to get your DNA scanned a decade ago, and less then 1K now, I think that the cost of artificial improvements will become cheaper and cheaper. As for the military, yes they will most probably adapt this technology, but not before it becomes very cheap. The US military now for example has the ability to provide an armour (dragon scale) to their soldiers which can stop an AK-47 bullet without large injuries to the wearer, yet they don't provide them, as the value of one soldier's life is too insignificant.
194492
Brage Gording
Posted about 2 years ago
Technology becoming part of people, and artificially bettering ourselves
This is of course a legitimate concern, yet I prefer to focus on the positive aspects, such as sick people becoming healthier, blind parent being able see their kids for the first time, etc. There are always dangers associated with advances in science and technology, the atomic bomb being a prime example, yet I believe that this is merely a fault of our nature to dominate others, and that once we can overcome this instinct, we will live in a much better world, which technology helped to create.
194492
Brage Gording
Posted about 2 years ago
Elon Musk's proposed Hyperloop
With superconductors super fast trains would be possible, and they would spend less fuel than conventional trains. Such trains have actually already been implemented in other cities and work wonderfully. And with advancements in technology, I believe it only a matter of time before these superconductors can operate at room temperatures and beyond, which will remove the necessity of cooling and lower costs even more. I would definitely ride these trains, knowing that I'm moving super fast, yet at the same time sitting comfortably in a chair. As for planes and boats I sadly do not know, but something similar could probably be applied to automobiles as well.
194492
Brage Gording
Posted about 2 years ago
Company no-couples policy: Who should quit?
This should be decided by the couple between themselves, it is not fair that the man should leave just because he earns less, yet it is also not fair that the woman should leave because the man "should take care of the family". This should be an internal decisions, and furthermore, I find it strange that the company should interfere in the personal lives of others.
194492
Brage Gording
Posted about 2 years ago
Is STEM a lie? Should science, technology, engineering, and mathematics be taught in school?
Studying physics, I'm probably not the best contender to fix it (I'd asksomeone who studies education) but if I'm forced to answer here is my response. The teacher is important, I myself remember the difference between a teacher who properly knew the subject and was enthusiastic about it, always being excited when someone brought him complicated questions, rather than going "oh thats not really in the curriculum". The class room should also be structured around the student, not around the teacher. By this I mean that instead of the teacher sitting (or standing for that matter) and spewing out information at the students, the students should be encouraged to actively ask questions and figure things out from themselves. To start this process, one might ask students questions, and ask them why when they answer (regardless of whether their response is good or not). I believe praise is alway a key factor in making students interested in a subject, but be careful not to lay too much weight on one student, make them all feel important. Finally, no facts! By this I mean don't merely say that something is, explain the whole story behind it, with all the wrong turns and the eventual right solutions. If someone said "And this is the equation for the momentum of a ball p=mv which was found by Newton", I'd be pretty bored. If, however, someone said "alright so why does a ball slow down?" someone might answer friction, at this point say "well what if I told you momentum must be conserved?" (if momentum has been explained). Most students will be dumbfounded, and then somehow let them figure out that its actually giving momentum to the whole earth by gentle prodding. What I'm essentially trying to say is let the students figure things out for themselves, and begin to enjoy asking questions and finding answers, and by doing so you will make the students interested in the subject, and inevitably better at it, as they think more. This is my take on the problem, hope it helps.