Morgan Rich

Life Coach, My Family
Portland, OR, United States

About Morgan

Bio

I am Morgan Rich. I hang out with teenagers who are passionate and want to make a difference in the world. But, who are trapped by all the “you’re supposed to”, “you should”, and “please conform” messages. Or they’re marginalized.

My clients are the ones who are dying a slow death of compromising and fallling into that place where they think they are the problem. I speak to parents and teenagers about Becoming Yourself, Being Scrappy: the skills you need to succeed in today's world, and Finding your path.

I aim to be a beacon of hope and inspiration williing to help their Real You emerge and blast into the world.

Teenagers have the creativity, passion, and energy to make a huge difference in the world as they begin to live the life they were born to live. 

Playing Huge is all about making this happen.

In my 20 years of experience working with teenagers, the ones in the most trouble are the ones whose parents an all kinds of screwed up, so first and formost, I am a husband and dad. My daily life is full of all the humbling moments, self-reflection, and the joy that parenting brings.

I live in Portland with my wife and 2 kids and our dog. I ride my bike everywhere I can, do as much yoga as possible, and love cooking with my family.

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

Teenagers, education, Parenting Adolescents, Life Transitions Coaching, Self Discovery, Finding the right kind of trouble, Becoming Yourself

An idea worth spreading

Know Yourself. Trust Yourself.
It is when we have that deep level of belief in ourselves that we are able to take on the world. Without confidence, we miss the lessons life brings us, we spend time wrestling with our self doubt and silly self talk, and we end up not living the life we were born to live. Brene Brown has found that those who feel love and belonging do so because they feel they are worthy of love an belonging. So, lets make sure that kids and teenagers feel seen and understood, so they build that deep belief that says "I am okay", "I am enough", and helps them know that they are ready for the world.

I'm passionate about

Helping teens stand confidently in their passion so they can share their gifts in the world.
Being a husband, a dad, a son, and a friend.
Playing Life as HUGE as I possibly can.

Talk to me about

Ecological awareness
New paradigms in education
Patch Adams.
Friends, family, community.

People don't know I'm good at

Brilliantly dancing in life with playfulness & excellence.

Reading body language & understanding people beyond what they say about themselves.

Physical expression of ideas & possibilities

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

193031
Morgan Rich
Posted about 1 year ago
How can we help kids and teenagers develop the deep belief in self they need to feel worthy, to be motivated, to feel confident?
Yes. Since forever. I think there is an important question to ask yourself, which is do you change it from inside or from outside. Good people are trying to do both. I chose the from the outside route, so I started working with teenagers in alternative kinds of settings and helping them wake up and believe in the aliveness they feel inside. My wife works at a school that uses the Reggio Emiila method. It's a beautiful child centered approach to educating kids. We are both pissed off about what's happening to kids these days and have found different approaches to do something about it. What is your way?
193031
Morgan Rich
Posted about 1 year ago
How can we help kids and teenagers develop the deep belief in self they need to feel worthy, to be motivated, to feel confident?
I totally get that you are able to have that experience of using your radio appearances as learning and making you better. You have enough confidence/experience that you trust yourself to either do it well enough or be able to handle a big mistake. It's a mistake to assume everyone can do the same. Or that it's easy. Or that just anyone can feel good about doing their best. I think it is something we should teach kids, and that's the question, because I see lots and lots and lots of people not able/willing to step into those places and handle the difficulties of the world. How does it take to create that level of confidence/belief in self?
193031
Morgan Rich
Posted about 1 year ago
How can we help kids and teenagers develop the deep belief in self they need to feel worthy, to be motivated, to feel confident?
Another thing. The whole being connected to people via technology is creating a real crisis of what relationships look like. I've had lots of teens say to me "I'll talk to them" which means "I'll text them". I now say, go, make eye contact with them and share your thoughts. And they get it. Lots of teenagers are worried and scared that they aren't learning how to be in relationships. It's like they get that they can't fall in love with someone via a text message, but don't know what else to do. And sadly, there are lots of adults modeling that technology is the way to communicate.
193031
Morgan Rich
Posted about 1 year ago
How can we help kids and teenagers develop the deep belief in self they need to feel worthy, to be motivated, to feel confident?
As I was reading your post here, the thing that jumped into my head was respecting yourself. As a parent and partner, you're going to be pushed and made to face the hard stuff. If you are compromised in your heart, your intention, your commitment - to yourself & then to others, it's going to be hard to respect yourself. If you can't respect yourself - Know Yourself and Trust Yourself - there is no chance that your kids and family will respect you. I hope to provide this level of self confidence and awareness in the teens that I coach.
193031
Morgan Rich
Posted about 1 year ago
How can we help kids and teenagers develop the deep belief in self they need to feel worthy, to be motivated, to feel confident?
In my 20 years of experience working with and now coaching teenagers, the ones in the most trouble are the ones whose parents an all kinds of screwed up. The way I describe it is if the parents haven't figured out their own crap, then they aren't stable enough to set their own insecurity aside and respond to other people - most notable their kid. They often blame the kid for their struggles and that is not a winning formula for anyone. My sense is that in the Larry Smith video part of the idea is to find your passion early enough that you can make a solid commitment to who you are and (hopefully) avoid having to make excuses for why you aren't becoming yourself. http://www.ted.com/talks/larry_smith_why_you_will_fail_to_have_a_great_career.html I am increasingly in the camp of, if you aren't solid and are having kids because you're supposed to and not because you really want to, then don't have kids. And if you're needing to maintain your lifestyle and use technology (i.e putting a video on for a kid at a restaurant so you can have your conversation) as a distraction, also probably best to bypass the parenting thing and enjoy your dinners.
193031
Morgan Rich
Posted about 1 year ago
How can we help kids and teenagers develop the deep belief in self they need to feel worthy, to be motivated, to feel confident?
I'm curious about your reaction to Larry's talk. How did you see it as a take on my question? It feels like it gets to the heart of what I am asking. How do you gain the strength to be able to say "unless" and stop making excuses? In the same way, I'm down Brene saying "those worthy of love and belonging are the ones who think they are worthy of love and belonging." Oh, great, just say unless. Or just think you are worthy. Um, my reflection is that it's harder than that. It's been so for me, and I see others struggle with it. And so I get curious. How can we help these go from ideas, hopes, goals, to people's reality?