Case Takata

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Noface
Case Takata
Posted about 2 years ago
Playing pretend and make believe: do children still do it?
You bring up a larger issue as well sir about the stagnation of technology due in part to a lack of imagination and creativity. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZoKfap4g4w http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Q25-S7jzgs I will cite these two talks as evidence. Though I do disagree with the whole country discouraging people as crazy or undesirable. I would say maybe that the US sees people with artistic creativity as not useful to the capitalist system we use because it's well not useful to the system. The thing is, if you put an artistically creative person in the right environment, then you will see some spectacular innovation.
Noface
Case Takata
Posted about 2 years ago
Playing pretend and make believe: do children still do it?
The reason I bring it up is because I see it in my family. Granted my siblings and I are older than the ones in the preface, but my parents pushed very early on to find something that we enjoyed, but could also be marketable. I attended an arts high school and really developed a love writing, acting and filmmaking, all things highly creative, and by my parents standards highly unemployable. Now I'm not saying that things like math and science aren't creative. It's just hard for a lot of people to wrap their heads around topics like that. What I am saying is, say a child early on loves telling stories, later, he realizes he can write them and pass on the joy he has to others through writing. But then someone tells him that being a writer isn't practical, and he should choose something else. It's saddens me to think about lost opportunities like that.
Noface
Case Takata
Posted about 2 years ago
Playing pretend and make believe: do children still do it?
I don't think television and video games are bad mind you. True they should probably get outside more, but I've seen that video games in particular inspire creative and imaginative ideas as much as they consume time. My younger brother (he's 13) for example is enamored with any flying vehicle in a game and always tries to think of ways that a design like he's seen would function in real life. It wouldn't surprise me if he became an engineer just to make his favorite aircraft a reality.
Noface
Case Takata
Posted about 2 years ago
Playing pretend and make believe: do children still do it?
I'm not saying it's dead necessarily. I'm sure children watching a tv show will daydream and think about going on an adventure with their heros. What I'm saying is they take those ideas and use them as a base for their adventures instead of making up their own if that makes sense. Because they're exposed to all this media so young, again not saying it's bad, but because of it, their creative process to me is stunted because they don't come up with original ideas necessarily. Now on that note there's a big difference between how children use imagination when they are alone and how they use it with others.
Noface
Case Takata
Posted about 2 years ago
Universities that pride themselves on developing future global leaders are actually failing in this regard. Do you agree or disagree?
I am only a freshman in university at the moment, but I feel as this issue is a very pressing, and relevant matter. The university system, especially the liberal arts universities, were designed to throw many ideas at a student, and see which stuck; which idea grabbed them and motivated them. However, with the economy the way it is for young college graduates, it seems to me that more and more institutions at the high school level are trying to steer students away from things they are interested in, and more towards "practical" alternatives, so by the time they reach university, they put themselves on a path that they may have no interest in. Perhaps one of the reasons parents and educators steer children away from writing, theatre, and dance is because society sees the arts as extracurricular activities. In a working society, going to see a movie, or a musical, or buying a book for pleasure, is seen as excess. Something that is fun once and a while, but not necessary to your job or success. Maybe that's why parents want their children to find jobs with purpose, such as being a doctor, or a lawyer, at least that is my belief. As a theatre student who studied Shakespeares contribution to the world in highschool, I find this viewpoint completely wrong. We seem very content to push ideas of creativity out, and replace them with "useful" skills, leaving our passions to be reduced to hobbies and weekend activities. Personally I find that being able to express myself creatively through writing gives me more pleasure than anything I've currently been taught, and also allows me to present my work to my peers who enjoy reading what I've created. Perhaps this is all the ramblings of a frustrated teenager on the verge of adulthood. But deep down, I see the current method of education as, not wrong, but unfairly skewed in favor of "practical" over creative.