James Kurt

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James Kurt
Posted over 2 years ago
Jennifer Healey: If cars could talk, accidents might be avoidable
Interesting topic. Aside from a controlled environment where all cars on the road had the same communication standards and technology, my guess is that a few "outliers" old cars, classic cars that could not perform these tasks would not be allowed on the roads. Or more likely, roads would become segregated for those cars that had the technology and those that did not. Unfortunately, when a driver who is used to driving under "priviledged road status" had to venture out onto regular roads without the benefit of constant feedback and communication from the rest of the system, they would be at a significant disadvantage. I'd love to see/hear what the Car Insurance industry's take on this topic would be. Where would the liability be? With the driver? The Car Manufacturer? They communications provider? Or the governmental agencies that would be tasked with sorting all of this information out should the unfortunate yet inevitable incident occur. I'd rather see a Disneyland style Peoplemover type system with Maglev Pods. You'd pick your pod, program i where you want to go and the master computer would whisk you away down your street to the more major traffic corridors where pods would "link" together like a train for longer distances cutting down on wind resistance and improving energy efficiency. When you got near your destination, the master controls would decouple you from the train and route you either from one artery to the next seamlessly taking into account all of the other traffic and destinations that were a part of the system at that time.
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James Kurt
Posted over 2 years ago
Would you prefer sales tax to income tax?
Sales Taxes are historically viewed as regressive taxes because the poor will spend their total income on things they need and pay tax on all of it. While those who are better off are able to save or invest. The money saved or invested is not taxed currently so the wealthy are seen as getting a freebie. If you were able to eliminate Income taxes altogether, the Sales/Use tax seems to become the most fair. The rich would pay taxes not at a higher rate, but certainly a higher amount since they are consuming at a greater rate. Conversely, a flat tax on income would also seem fair as all those who earn will pay at the same rate. Those who make more, will pay more in total but at the same rate as those who are lower paid. Under the Sales/Use tax scenario, the savings and investments of the rich are more like an annuity for the government. One day, those funds will be spent. At that time, the taxes will be collected, not only on the original income earned but also any and all gains made as a result of the savings and investing. In a flat tax scenario, the income taxes are paid NOW, at the time of the earnings. The expectations of the citizenship should be that their elected officials are good stewards of those funds. Saving and investing for the future while conducting the business of running the government today.
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James Kurt
Posted over 2 years ago
Is America past its prime? DISCUSS WITH Robert Gordon and Erik Brynjolfsson in a LIVE DEBATE, Thursday at 4pm Eastern.
I agree with the point that wealth is being created at an increasing rate for those who can participate and who are producing value to the economy. It would be interesting to view those about wealth in constant, inflation adjusted dollars. However, one problem with the digital economy is that while tremendous wealth is made by a select few, at the end of the day the things that we "need" have real and tangible value. Cars, roads, TV's, Houses, shingles, pipe, concrete, food, clean water. People spend money on these things. If they are made, mined or produced overseas, that is where the money will go and those countries involved in the creation of those actual products will be the beneficiaries of an employed and expanding middle class.
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James Kurt
Posted over 2 years ago
Is America past its prime? DISCUSS WITH Robert Gordon and Erik Brynjolfsson in a LIVE DEBATE, Thursday at 4pm Eastern.
More importantly, the "Digital Divide" or the "Great Decoupling" will further the divide between the "haves" and the "have nots". We are obviously living in a Digital World. Those who have access to the technology and an understanding of how to use the technology to create something other than requests for your friends to feed your digital farm animals while you are at work will improve economically. Those who either don't have access to the technology or who use it to otherwise waste countless hours of the day in an otherwise enjoyable but non-productive manner will flounder.
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James Kurt
Posted over 2 years ago
Is America past its prime? DISCUSS WITH Robert Gordon and Erik Brynjolfsson in a LIVE DEBATE, Thursday at 4pm Eastern.
One of the things that has made America Great, has been the ability to look to the future and to place bets/investments that will pay off for decades to come. Think about the infrastructure, Highways, Rail, Pipelines, Bridges etc... These types of investments not only put real people to work, but also stimulated local economies and connected population centers for commerce. Today, the US seems to be caught up in short term investments and entitlement programs that consume disproportionate amounts of GDP, without providing much in return for future generations. How can the US have better days in front of us when our society rewards those who don't contribute to the economy, education rates and literacy are deplorable, our roads, transportation, bridges and other infrastructure is crumbling. The chasm between the "haves" and the "have nots" has historically been filled by a large middle class that provided a buffer between the groups and provided "hope" that there was a better future with some work and sacrifice now. What will it take to get us back on the right track?