Hannah Hunt

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Comments & conversations

186889
Hannah Hunt
Posted about 2 years ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
I'm so surprised that 100 grams of crickets has so many calories in it. Are there any other insects that have a smaller caloric value closer to chicken? I think, besides it being insects, that this could make people hesitant to eating them, especially since obesity is so prevalent nowadays and eating healthy and exercising is such a fad right now. I think maybe in developing nations where famine is more common this could be a good option. Insects are found everywhere, so growing them would not be too hard. I think we have to switch to a more plant-based diet. Insects are a good idea for getting some protein and other nutrients, but I do not think that it will replace cattle. Instead, it will probably just become another option on a menu as it becomes more acceptable, at least in developed nations.
186889
Hannah Hunt
Posted about 2 years ago
Can urban beehives increase food production?
I think pesticides really need to be looked into more, not just for bees but for other pollinators too. Pesticides are good in that they kill the pests that would normally harm or destroy crops. But pesticides can also kill the good organisms that crops benefit from. Unfortunately it seems as though there is not just one cause of CCD. TIME magazine posted an article online that says, along with pesticides, things that cause CCD are several viruses, a parasitic mite, and a bacterial disease. While hopefully the pesticides that do cause CCD will eventually not be used, viruses, mites and bacteria are much harder to treat in bees. http://science.time.com/2013/05/07/beepocalypse-redux-honey-bees-are-still-dying-and-we-still-dont-know-why/
186889
Hannah Hunt
Posted about 2 years ago
Will the Belo Monte Dam project on the Amazon River cause more harm to the environment or will it be a good source of energy for Brazil?
The sad thing is that I am not surprised that Brazil is ignoring the pleas of the indigenous peoples and environmental advocates, seeing as how they have clear-cutted so much of the Amazon Rainforest already in their country. I think it is ridiculous that they are having to rely on the military to complete surveys of the areas. I think that the Brazilian government should take a hint that maybe they should not build these dams, when so many people are trying to stop them, to the point of them declaring war on the Brazilian government. Why not look at other energy alternatives that are not so destructive to the land around them?
186889
Hannah Hunt
Posted about 2 years ago
Cats pose a serious threat to biodiversity: Why do we accept it? What should be done?
I think that Morgan is on the right track, but I think that there are some things that he needs to edit. I do not think that the part where the unregistered cats get automatically euthanized. I think that most people would be against that. A better option would be to keep the cats around for a period of time and see if they are adopted during that time. Obviously some difficulties with this would be finding space to keep the cats and the costs that come with this. Another problem with his proposal is that he is relying on people to be encouraged to do some of this stuff. What is encouraging them, besides the verbal encouragement from the government, to capture these feral cats and bring them in to authorities? Also, putting a chip into a cat is probably not cheap. Will there be an incentive to getting them chipped, like free chipping or a discount for a period of time? Cost could be a barrier for some people. I do think that something should be done about the cats, before all the birds are eaten.
186889
Hannah Hunt
Posted about 2 years ago
Purell now, Bacteri-ell later?
I agree. In Jonathan Eisen's talk, he mentions that the microbiome is not necessarily the same for each person. Some people that have a certain disease might be missing some crucial bacteria that could cure them. A lotion would be most beneficial to people if it could be individualized to fit people's needs. This most likely will not happen any time soon, or ever. And like you mentioned, we do not know if this would even work. I would think that this would work as well as taking probiotics. Anyone know how effective that is? Even if this was possible, the public would have to get this notion of 'all bacteria is bad' out of their heads. Obviously those that take probiotics and some others know that bacteria and other microbes are necessary for good health. Unfortunately we live in a world where Lysol and other products pride themselves on killing 99.9% of bacteria, even though most of those probably are not bad for you. It will take some time for the public to change their minds about microbes. Hopefully people will go outside more and get in touch with nature until that happens.
186889
Hannah Hunt
Posted about 2 years ago
What form of renewable energy has or will have the lowest impact on biodiversity?
For concentrated solar power, can the panels and mirrors somehow be on buildings? From what I have read on it, it seems as though right now the solar panels are lined up in fields with a mirror in the middle. Creating these fields of solar panels has an impact on biodiversity by destroying habitats and creating edge effects. By putting solar panels on buildings, the impact on biodiversity would be dramatically less. Here is some more info about concentrated solar power: http://solareis.anl.gov/guide/solar/csp/