Rob Sutcliffe

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Rob Sutcliffe
Posted about 1 year ago
Games that teach and make you learn new things.
Totally agree! I failed everything in school! Very dyslexic. Maybe that's how I ended up working in education! To try and put it right! BAck in the classroom I used to try and turn everything into a game and the students loved it... if nothing else they all learned a lot more when they were having a good time!
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Rob Sutcliffe
Posted about 1 year ago
Get Congressmembers to argue in favor of their opposing viewpoint.
I understand what you are saying. I guess I'd rather spend my vote on the integrity of the individule/party rather than on any single policy that might not be relevant four years from now. And if I was voting based on a policy, I'd need to be very sure that they fully understand the argument against their policy.
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Rob Sutcliffe
Posted about 1 year ago
Get Congressmembers to argue in favor of their opposing viewpoint.
I understand what you are saying. I guess I'd rather spend my vote on the integrity of the individule/party rather than on any single policy that might not be relevant four years from now. And if I was voting based on a policy, I'd need to be very sure that they fully understand the argument agains their policy.
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Rob Sutcliffe
Posted about 1 year ago
Games that teach and make you learn new things.
Sorry Michael, I meant the word 'Gamification' is ridiculous not the concept. I guess I think it's ridiculous because it's looking at the mechanisms behind it that date back further than games themselves. If you are genuinely interested in how you can use the aspects of games in a learning environment I would strongly suggest this free course on coursera https://www.coursera.org/course/gamification I and a few of our elearning designers have used this course and I feel it is one of the best free resources to learn more about game mechanics and how to use them outside of gaming. The theory applies just as easily to any classroom learning too and there are several examples of this throughout the course. Hope it helps and you can put it into practice for your ideas.
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Rob Sutcliffe
Posted about 1 year ago
Get Congressmembers to argue in favor of their opposing viewpoint.
How do you know that they fully understands the other side of the argument tho? I think what's great about Eriks point is, if we see the politician go through this process. We know that they fully understand both sides and are forming and argument and not a contradiction of what the other is saying. Once they understand and have argued both sides they also don't need to wory about protecting any ego. Also don't rule out the posibility that you hadn't fully considered both side of the argument when you voted for them.
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Rob Sutcliffe
Posted about 1 year ago
Games that teach and make you learn new things.
What you are refering to is (rather ridiculously) refered to as 'Gamification' It's taking the mechanisims that keep gamers hooked and using it in a non-gaming way. There is a lot of theory behind what intrinsicly motivates us, when we get dopamine released and the slighly scary way that games create reward loops to keep your dopamine releases consistent and give you withdrawles when you stop. I'd suggest you do a search for Gamification and see what you find. Game mechanisms have been sucessfully used for diet plans, excercise plans and online or offline learning but much more in marketing! If you'd like to know more feel free to email me. I work in elearning and gamification is big news in education right now.
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Rob Sutcliffe
Posted about 1 year ago
Is Korean Education Good?
Korea has very few nateral resources and is very populated leaving little space for farming. This meens the only way for the country to progress is by business and industy. Its also a seriously competative culture. Education seems to be similar to business in Korea that it is more about attendance than ability. I've seen many Korean students show up to their hagwon (after school academy) and just sit through the class half asleep till the end. Then I'd go to try and make a bank transfer and have to wait almost an hour while the half concious bank teller tries to work out how to do that. In Korea that bank teller got his job bassed 100% on his university degree and he got into that univerisity purely based on his high school grades... it applies all the way back to pre school. Once they have their degree their is actually no pressure at all to do well, because everything is based on that degree. I believe that without changing the culture it is benificial to the individule becuase getting that degree is so important to getting a good job in Korea. and in Korean someones status is directly related to how successful they are at work. I think it's stressful for the children but not as stressful as been an adult without a degree in Korea! The actual class time tends to be quite sociable and interactive (form my experience) Koreans tend to never be on their own and are always in a group having fun and class room is often not an exception. I remember one student been really suprised that I'd not want to spend all my time studying and I realised that to her, it was an enjoyable activity. For the country. I hear that although the average Korea works much longer hours they are less productive than the average European. And the students tend to all be higher graded at academic subjects like Maths and Science but have a hard time when it comes to creative thinking and forming their own judgements. With the exception of you of course CheEun!