Shelby Hansen

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Comments & conversations

186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
I think as long as I didn't have to stare directly into the eyes of a bug as I was attempting to eat it I wouldn't mind this idea. Everything said above is true. Our food, in my opinion is going to crap. Big name companies own all the major food production industries which supply major chain grocery stores. These companies only care about making the biggest profit they can with little thought about what is actually being thrown into our food to make it taste good. With the economy today buying local or all natural foods from smaller chain specialty stores is difficult on many peoples wallets. If bugs could be a more nutritional and natural additive at a decent price they why shouldn't we consider it? As long as bugs taste like chicken like Timon and Pumba claim, then I am game!
186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted over 1 year ago
Can urban beehives increase food production?
I think most people have a little background knowledge in the sense that they know bees pollinate flowers. I don't think people know what a huge importance this is because pollen is also associated with allergies, which people also hate. I agree with both of you that some kind of further awareness of just how important pollination by bees is needed. We are using up practically every square inch of usable land for population development. Bees no longer pollinate mostly in woodlands away from the general public, they pollinate right in our backyards. Education is key!
186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted over 1 year ago
Can urban beehives increase food production?
I think that beekeeping is such an amazing skill to have, and I also tend to think of it as a difficult skill to have. This may be because I have never been stung by a bee and have been trying to avoid bees for fear that I may be allergic to them. However, the more I've learned about bees the more I think of beekeeping as any other acquired skill; you've got to learn the ins and outs of how to do it just like anything else. So with that said I really like the idea of urban beekeeping. I don't know if I would personally do it, but there are a lot of people out there who may really like bees but never thought it was possible to beekeep in urban areas. If it can be beneficial for pollination rates and increasing certain food sources, then it may be able to remove some of the negative stigma that surrounds bees.
186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted over 1 year ago
Will the Belo Monte Dam project on the Amazon River cause more harm to the environment or will it be a good source of energy for Brazil?
I think that dams are a great way to generate power, but in the case of Brazil at what cost? I think the Brazilian government is trying to find ways to generate more electricity and hydroelectric power is a very logical choice considering how many rivers flow through the Amazon Basin. The calculated loss of biodiversity and displacement of people the construction of these dams will cause is not worth it in my opinion and the Brazilian government would see that if they were actually trying to benefit the entire country. I doubt any of the displaced people would even get much of the benefits of the hydroelectric power which would be generated which is very sad.
186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted over 1 year ago
Will the Belo Monte Dam project on the Amazon River cause more harm to the environment or will it be a good source of energy for Brazil?
I believe a similar situation like this one happened on a smaller scale in Haiti in 1957. A dam was built which created Lake PĂ©ligre. This lake submerged much of Cange, a rural impoverished village in Haiti. Many of the people who had lived along the Artibonite River were displaced, just as they will be in Brazil. Much of the power generated by the dam doesn't even benefit the people of Cange, who were the most effected. I can only speculate on the biodiversity lost in this case, but I'm sure there was some. Considering Cange was engulfed in diseases like malaria and TB before the implementation of this dam, the results I'm sure only got worse. Considering malaria and TB combined can be incredibly more debilitating than either one separately was a huge concern, especially to Paul Farmer who took root in Cange and has battled malaria, HIV/AIDS, and TB for countless years there. I can only imagine the devastating impact this dam will have on the regions health as well as the impacts on biodiversity. It is a sad day when history repeats itself, especially when it is for the worse. The rich and powerful are the ones that matter and have the ultimate say. It is a sad truth to this world that I hope can change soon because everyone is a human being and deserves basic human rights, no matter how little money they may have.
186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted over 1 year ago
Cats pose a serious threat to biodiversity: Why do we accept it? What should be done?
I agree. It would be really hard to encourage people to pay more for a microchip, or any other sort of device to track their cats. And for stray cats coming into humane societies and such, who would pick up the cost for those cats getting chipped or sterilized. I think if there were more harsh guidelines (fees) to adopting and maintaining ownership of cats this could discourage people from getting cats at all. This could definitely cut back on the amount of stray and feral cats and their ability to procreate if less and less people are wanting cats. But, considering the staggering number of estimated cats in the U.S. ~160 million, the demand for cats decreasing due to harsher ownership guidelines would take a while. I definitely think the fact that cats are harming endemic species is a major issue and there needs to be a way to control it that will be popular among the public. Because ultimately people will want cats, just like people wanted alcohol during the prohibition, even though it was illegal. If the majority of the public is willing to support some sort of control mechanisms for cats, only then will we see an improvement. I love cats, but I definitely think there are way to many stray and feral cats in the world.
186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted over 1 year ago
Purell now, Bacteri-ell later?
I work in a deli and have at least five pretty bad burns from various HOT things I clean at my job. I apply honey immediately after getting burned and virtually receive no visible scar. I'm not sure why this is, but I agree with you about honey. It's amazing!
186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted over 1 year ago
Purell now, Bacteri-ell later?
It's true that maggot medicine and probiotics are becoming popular, but in what sector? Who can actually afford these things in our current economy. Especially when most families are struggling just to get food on the table, who has the extra money to pay for these medical remedies when their families survival may be on the line. I think these things are a very high-end clientele type of product that only gain interest from people who can afford health insurance in which their doctors recommend them. Much of the U.S. doesn't even have health insurance because it is to expensive. I like the idea, but as a poor college student I think it is going to be left to the higher end tax bracket and everyone else will just have to get our microbes naturally.
186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted over 1 year ago
Purell now, Bacteri-ell later?
I think this would be a very tricky idea to introduce to people. There is a great amount of knowledge out there that yes being to hygienic is not necessarily going to mean you get sick less often or have a better immune system. However, asking people to willingly "dirty" their hands would be a hard sell because that is how most people would view it, as dirtying their hands. I think that with a greater amount of research and testing this could be possible. I like the idea but people in the non-science community have barely begun to scratch the surface on their knowledge of microbes that scientists have known for a while longer. Getting people much more knowledgeable about microbes and specifically what certain microbes can do would be the best way to start. Considering the main goal of every business is to make a profit, no business will not to manufacture a hand lotion that people may view in a negative way because their sales would be atrocious. That being said I like this idea and I think there could be a lot of potential breakthroughs in the study of microbes that could bring about the need for a product like this.
186871
Shelby Hansen
Posted over 1 year ago
What form of renewable energy has or will have the lowest impact on biodiversity?
I like the idea of geothermal energy because it releases far less carbon dioxide then burning fossil fuels and very little nitrous oxide and sulfur gas are given off. It can be constantly produced and can cut energy bills by 30-40%. The biggest down fall and ultimate demise of this type of energy is how much it costs to put geothermal energy plants in place. Of the figures I saw it costs roughly 1-4 million to drill well and in-home geothermal energy pump system are roughly $30,000. This is really expensive and our infrastructure here in the U.S. I don't believe has a good amount of access to drilling sites. Not to mention what kind of side effects drilling may have on biodiversity.