Patrick Murphy

Eugene, OR, United States

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Comments & conversations

188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
John! you are exactly right, and I think that's a constant controversy when talking about food scarcity. We are looking for the short cut, easiest way to manipulate the environment for our benefit. This is an inconceivable method for solving something as complex as food production. As we learn from ecology and biodiversity, it is a combination of innumerable factors that creates a healthy ecosystem and it can be done on farms as well. Miguel Medialdea from Veta la Palma in Spain has managed to create the perfect farming environment where there are no negatives from the farming. Not too mention the outstanding benefits that result from his fish farm; actually purifying the water, bringing more diversity into the ecosystem, and the magic part, he doesn't even feed his fish. 100% unfed fish are raised in this natural sustainable farm. These kind of practices are what we really need more than the single save all food solution that everyone keeps desperately searching for.
188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
Thank you for bringing up that some of the food sources that we already depend on, are not as beneficial as popular media has made them out to be. Vegetarians tend to use popular media in this way to promote plant diets, even though many of our crops may turn out to be healthier for individuals it is globally damaging the earth to produce these crops. Despite that plants are primary producers and receive and transfer energy best, they heavily rely upon human maintenance. Insects may not be primary producers, but their variable diet allows them to feed on nearly any bio-waste, they use less water and require almost no maintenance. Thanks to the immense biodiversity among insects, different species can be raised in their natural environments, in sustainable ways that benefit the environment. Also I actually find tofu disgusting, but have been able to eat it on occasion when cooked in certain ways. The same can be and will be done for bugs when they are introduced into meals. I think this has been one of the bigger problems people have getting over the idea of eating bugs. Even though Simba in the Lion King made it cool to eat bugs they also engrained this idea that they are eaten raw. I don't think that's true about almost any food we eat, and so i would hope that interesting cooking recipes would be created.
188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
More ideas like this need to be brought to light since so many people don't understand the significance of an ancient diet. People have begun to work on bringing back parts of our historical diet, and that can be seen with the surge in organic and natural diets. I think this could be the next step and some important societal figures could help to make this diet popular.
188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
I feel like this concern arises from its ability to eat an organism when you can see it. If we have to look at a cricket we won't want to eat it, Similar to how we dont want to cut a piece of steak off the cow, we just want the meat product. I feel like changing how we eat them can make them much more enjoyable for US consumers. If you were to dice bugs up into a dip or spread it could be very good on something like bread or crackers. Just like how we are willing to eat a meal when we don't know what is in it. Similar to how I love deviled eggs more than anything but hate mayonnaise, I recently found that it was in the eggs but I still eat them because i don't recognize what makes up the meal. If we aren't able to identify the organism than we are much more okay with the idea of eating them.
188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
I have been wondering that same thing with pesticides, because it seems to be one of the larger issues with eating bugs. However, I feel like enclosed farms, similar to what can be seen at the Zebrafish International Research Center, would make farming bugs much more feasible, pesticide-free, and have a very low level of escapement. There are a lot of questions about how a cultural change such as this might begin to affect the biodiversity of lands that begin to farm them. However, because of the immense number of insect species, I feel that we would not be able to alter the global insect biodiversity by enough compared to what it will save in flora and other fauna species.
188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
I like that idea, because they are willing to try anything if they think it will help their athletic development. I'm not sure, but I feel like there have to be certain species of bugs that contain rare essential amino acids, or hormones that could help with training. Marketing bugs in a new light such as that could help it become a more mainstream commodity.
188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
I'm glad you bring up the point of how the pesticides affect our diet. I'm sure some research could find some correlation between how much they pick up based on how much pesticide is used, but i couldn't find any. However, this has been a large issue with other cultures resulting in them ending their entomophagy. This could end up not being a problem but I think we need to look extensively at the ecosystem where insects are raised. Thanks to the large diversity in bugs I'm sure some species will be more suitable for growth in urban environments than others, but that could be very hard to determine.
188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
That video is extremely cool, i like how casually that guy just started eating those worm tacos. This is the kind of mentality that more people need to get used to eating bugs. It seems that this perveption of our food seems to be the biggest issue. Eating bugs is not that much harder to grasp when you realize many people don't like to know where on the animal their steak came from. They like what the steak looks like when its done and ready to eat, and if we could do the same to bug meat so people can't tell where that meat comes from(processed bugs or protein extracts), then we can start to culturally accept the idea of eating bugs as a meal.
188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
Ashley- I can understand why processed foods might sound gross, but its a plausible way to introduce them into our diet. John-I can see the worry of commercializing the bugs in ways similar to what has been done to beef poultry, etc., but while i agree it is an exploitation of the bugs and the land they are grown in, it may not be as detrimental to the growth of these bugs. They don't need to genetically modify most insects since they convert feed so well and can be grown in spaces similar to how the zebrafish were at the research center. These advantages should help with bug production and keep it from requiring too many modifications.
188171
Patrick Murphy
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
I think he makes the statement that bugs are already there because it proves a point that they're in our diet already and it's not causing any alarm, that's why the FDA allows such large amount of bugs in the food we already eat. I don't think we'll have to deal with some of those same problems with commercial farming due to how easy it is to grow bugs. They can be grown in such small area that land will not become an issue in the foreseeable future.