Fatima Abdullah

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Fatima Abdullah
Posted 24 days ago
Bobby Ghosh: Why global jihad is losing
what? jihad of the sword means self defense, a physical struggle against people physically attacking your sense of security... which means as a Muslim you are never allowed to be the one instigating violence, no matter what. All those things you mentioned that take place in your version of physical jihad are not allowed in Islam anyway. stop being a troll please.
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Fatima Abdullah
Posted 25 days ago
Lesley Hazleton: The doubt essential to faith
I have yet to watch the video but from the summary and comments I feel like it will be great! And for people saying the Prophet had no doubt, do not forget surat Ad-Dho'ha, which reads as a reassurance. What made Muhammad (pbuh) such a revered figure is his ultimate humanity, not his sanctity. There is a reason God sent humans as messengers.
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Fatima Abdullah
Posted 25 days ago
Mustafa Akyol: Faith versus tradition in Islam
true, and a lot of people have had different interpretations of what the hijab manifests as. I feel like it was intentionally left as a gray area so that way we do not become an "external appearance" based society, but one where we can interact without judgement, or labeling.
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Fatima Abdullah
Posted about 1 year ago
Females mammals are the underpinning of written language. Sex & sexism exists in every literate culture, so why wouldn't it be in language?
And when you say "the alphabet has just simplified faster.", I will disagree. It is neither simpler nor more complicated. Its simplicity is relative to the cultural context. If I am in America, it is "simple" to introduce someone indifferently as one of my aunts. However, in Arabic speaking contexts, that would not be the case. That option, like Keith Chen said, does not exist. It is simply (simply!) not there, and to do or say otherwise is impossible-and therefor a complication. So in Arabic it would be simple to say "mart 3ami", or "ukht umi", or "khalti" which means, simply, in one word, my mother's sister who is my aunt, and which also carries a degree of respect based on family relations. Catch my drift? Basically, and I am sorry if this bothers, I am refuting your claims which are presented without much substance. I am defensive because I always see people including Arabic or what is Arab or Middle Eastern blindly into conversations, as if Arabs and Middle Easterners don't read commentaries. or do not comment. And it is not easy enough, or simple enough, to draw in different languages which have a more sophisticated (instead of complicated vs. simple) structure than English (since this is the language you are commenting in and comparing "sounds" and "B"'s and "V"'s to) into such a broad hypothesis which obviously did not have much researched input.
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Fatima Abdullah
Posted about 1 year ago
Females mammals are the underpinning of written language. Sex & sexism exists in every literate culture, so why wouldn't it be in language?
Well, "B" and "V" do not swap sounds in Arabic, and as a matter of fact, Arabic does not have the "v" sound at all. Also, considering the script of Arabic, even Persian (which does have "V" but I doubt they are used interchangeably since I have never heard my friend using them that way) how do you suggest they infer inherent sexism in language? The Arabic word for mother is "umm", father: "abb" (the b for "ba'" pronounced for father, note). how does this have anything to do with milk? Frankly, I am confused by you. Also, there has to be taken into consideration that the term "Arab" was origianlly used for nomadic tribes, later evolved (mostly due to politicaly reasons from what I have read) into a homogenized term for anyone speaking A specific language (Arabic) and stretches all the way to North Africa (Morocco-although their Arabic is wildly different from Arabic of the Mediterranean region in terms of vocabulary and pronunciation). Which means there is a broad cultural and geographic landscape that had been long been addressed to establish this kind of "sameness". Then, what about languages with no specific script? such as the natives of the Incan time/region who used knotted thread? I clearly remember hearing about this when I was younger. And then, the early followers of Christianity, was not their language Hebrew or a root language of Hebrew? If what you say is true then how is it that these "stories" have remained unaltered by changing language? And a religion that has traversed various cultures? Also, it is important to take into consideration the religion, since Judaism, Christianity, Islam, even Hinduism and Zoroastrianism, play off of the same core religious beliefs, and are often viewed as a continuation of one another, so saying "plagiarized" is kind of jumping to conclusions here. However, plagiarized is an interesting word to consider since it denotes writing something a certain way, and the writing of holy books was always a process.