Chelsea Klocke

Eugene, OR, United States

About Chelsea

Universities

University of Oregon

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Chelsea Klocke
Posted about 2 years ago
What will happen when the world speaks only a few languages?
I see the parallel between species extinction and language extinction. Species can evolve or die out naturally over time or humans can over exploit them and degrade their habitat, causing them to die out in a relatively short amount of time. Similarly, as people interact with the world and each other in new ways, language will change. I do think the means by which this change occurs and the time scale over which it occurs matters.
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Chelsea Klocke
Posted about 2 years ago
Can we control the emergence of zoonotic infectious disease?
You and Sandra make great points that dealing directly with villagers might prove difficult. What the governments need to address are the underlying causes, such as foreign demand for bushmeat and timber that causes deforestation. Infection may be difficult to control at the local level, but perhaps with greater surveillance we can prevent global epidemics.
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Chelsea Klocke
Posted about 2 years ago
Can we control the emergence of zoonotic infectious disease?
One way to be proactive in epidemic prevention is to hold governments accountable for the health of their people by encouraging them to make disease surveillance a priority. According to Stephen S. Morse, PhD, a professor of epidemiology at Colombia University, “governments are often reluctant to report disease information for fear of political embarrassment, economic repercussions, or concern that it may make the government look ineffectual.” Dr. Morse is a founder of the Program for Monitoring Emerging Diseases (ProMED) “a scientist-to-scientist network connecting more than 30,000 subscribers in 155 countries, and the World Health Organization's Global Outbreak and Response Network (GOARN).” I think if disease surveillance were a priority of governments they wouldn’t be able to ignore the factors contributing to disease transmission such as deforestation and bushmeat hunting. This could have positive repercussions for not only control of disease, but other environmental issues as well. Here’s the article about infectious disease monitoring: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070718001839.htm
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Chelsea Klocke
Posted about 2 years ago
How do we justify consumption of palm oil? What can we do to stop palm oil companies from destroying the African rainforest?
Those are great points. It’s also true that the problem with the jobs provided by outside corporations or tourism are not necessarily permanent. If the demand for palm oil goes down and the money dries up, or if some event occurs where tourists are no longer interested in visiting that country, the people would be stranded and their land would now be unusable.
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Chelsea Klocke
Posted about 2 years ago
How do we justify consumption of palm oil? What can we do to stop palm oil companies from destroying the African rainforest?
On the link you provided, allforafrica.org, there is an “open letter” from Bruce Wrobel, the CEO of Herakles Farms in response to the Oakland Institute’s September 2012 report. Much of the letter is devoted to talking up Herakles Farm and its partners, or trying to discredit those who oppose them. Wrobel repeatedly calls himself and his supporters environmentalists but doesn’t demonstrate many ways in which they have supported environmental causes. That, however, does not seem to be their mission. They are supposedly more concerned with helping combat the problem of poverty. He provides examples of when Herakles Capital has helped struggling communities by providing access to modern technology and stimulating economic growth. Herakles farms is, according to Wrobel, already an economic boon for the people and he disputes the claim that they do not have public support. However, this letter smacks of a public relations effort. He address the environmental impact the plantation would have, saying that they conducted studies and did impact assessments in the area to determine how to proceed in an environmentally friendly way (I have a feeling these were not peer-reviewed studies). He also notes that the wildlife parks surrounding the area have not provided the local economy with the promised tourism income, and that poaching in these parks is a huge problem fueled by this reality of scarce economic opportunity. He argues that Herakles Farms will bring in revenue that can be used to better serve the parks. I do think Wrobel, whatever his true motivation, raised some interesting points in this letter that should be given more thought by both sides. I think social causes are often not given proper consideration by environmentalists and vice versa. A solution cannot be sustainable until both human and environmental needs are met in some way. The hard part is figuring out how.
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Chelsea Klocke
Posted about 2 years ago
Does urban “green” harbor healthier microbes?
I think both environmental sustainability and green spaces are becoming a prominent part of city planning because science has elucidated how our environment affects our physical and mental health, which in turn affects other factors such as crime rates. Local organizations such as Beyond Toxics (http://www.beyondtoxics.org/) in Eugene are working to reduce environmental/health risks due to pesticides and air pollution in low-income neighborhoods. They also have a “healthy bee” campaign that is working to create more pesticide-free garden areas in Eugene. I think if there is a connection between microbial diversity and human health this will strengthen the argument for green spaces, in addition to the evidence that they may improve mental health and reduce obesity.
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Chelsea Klocke
Posted about 2 years ago
Does urban “green” harbor healthier microbes?
Here is an interesting method to incorporate green space into the workplace: http://www.theverge.com/2013/5/22/4354696/amazon-rufus-campus-artificial-biome-office-proposal Amazon.com is planning on building integrated artificial biomes (greenhouses) to serve as work spaces on their new campus in Seattle. I think if this is successful it could potentially change the way we plan to build in the future. I wonder if these artificial biomes will harbor the same amount of microbial diversity as a natural space?