Audrey Hill

Forest Hills, NY, United States

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Audrey Hill
Posted over 4 years ago
How can we empower kids to reshape the education system? *A TEDActive Education Project Question*
Poor students = poor schools. It's not government that is the reason why poor students have less access. Belief that capitalism in control will result in a better product and more satisfaction is one that must (in the current climate) be held without supporting evidence. Again, I come back to the health care industry. But I might as well look at the way in which capitalism undermines communities. It used to be that recession was consistent with a depressed stockmarket, decline in consumer confidence, and a failing job market. Now, we have a thriving stockmarket, a failing job market, failing real estate market and decline in consuumer confidence. All institutions whether profit seeking or public tend toward corruption over time. Communism suffers from lack of initiative, but capitalism suffers from a lack of conscience. Capitalism supports capitalism, not communities, not education, not better products, not health care. It is inherently disinterested in being a driving force for anything but profit. It serves itself even at the expense of the host.
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Audrey Hill
Posted over 4 years ago
How can we empower kids to reshape the education system? *A TEDActive Education Project Question*
My belief is that preschool montessori is great and that by 2nd or 3rd grade, children want to know the rules. They want to get it right.. so it's a prefect time for a classical approach where we lay down the foundation skills. By middle school, social development is the developmental focus and group work and interactive learning becomes more important. By high school, we need to tear down what we've taught and re-see the world. Much like Foundation Year in art school, the structures we've established so that the young mind can understand and coordinate ideas and skills need to be reconsidered, rethought or thrown away for a time so that the mind learns to consider new ideas and structures.
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Audrey Hill
Posted over 4 years ago
How can we empower kids to reshape the education system? *A TEDActive Education Project Question*
no... it isn't free if you pay taxes. But, you will pay those taxes whether they pay for infrastructure or not. Wait and see. More to the point, however, competition has not improved health care or industry to the extent that you seem to think it has. We don't have a strictly free market. If we did, a public option would be an easy sell. But, insurance companies don't want to compete with a public option choice. It would put a bite on their profits. Look at housing or clothing or really any product. After a certain point, it makes much more sense to regiment tastes so that products can be made and sold efficiently. The first iteration of many products on the market today were of a higher quality than the same product after initial consumer investment. The owners seek to make the same device or provide the same service for less money so as to increase their profits. They work with other makers to fix price and product. Eventually, the consumer must buy the product that is offered. Of course, the wealthy consumer will get access to a superior product, but the average consumer will not. Similarly, competition in school systems will result in creating products that produce more profit. Parents will think they have choice because they can pick and choose between mediocre options. Wealthy parents will take their vouchers and go off to their elite, selective schools that prepare leaders and culture makers and the middle and working class parents will take test scores... naively equating higher test scores on mediocre tests with a quality education. Too bad for them, eh?
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Audrey Hill
Posted over 4 years ago
How can we empower kids to reshape the education system? *A TEDActive Education Project Question*
My fear is that disruptive innovation is a prettified term for decay and experimentation. It sounds so sexy and now, but I find that much of the new in every generation needs revision down the road. When I was starting out in education, whole language and invented spelling was all the rage. Four or five generations of illiterate children later we finally realize that whole language was a bankrupt idea that mainly benefited the enthusiastic academics who made careers and money on it before it trended back. Children are not our lab rats, particularly children born in poverty who can't necessarily bounce back from ideas that sounds better on paper (or video) than in reality. We can experiment with new ideas, but creating ideologies and forcing whole generations to demonstrate their value or lack is socially irresponsible and disruptive to the futures of these children. It looks like more use of the underclass by the connected classes after a while.
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Audrey Hill
Posted over 4 years ago
How can we empower kids to reshape the education system? *A TEDActive Education Project Question*
I think what you're talking about is excellent for children whose parents are empowered and who have been nurtured in an environment that is so individualized and thoughtful. But, it is likely to be disastrous for poor children and those who come from otherwise decayed family structures. They don't have the social, emotional, intellectual or physical context for what you suggest. The foundation that needs to be in place is not there. Children in inner city schools or who are born to, say, alcoholics, substance abusers or 13 year old parents live in chaos and their vision for the future is constrained by that chaos. They need to have their interests and experiences expanded before they can really set upon a journey of self-discovery. First, they need reliable structures that can support development in areas that are underdeveloped due to environmental deficits.
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Audrey Hill
Posted over 4 years ago
How can we empower kids to reshape the education system? *A TEDActive Education Project Question*
Put a foundation in and then explore ideas. Informal education for children whose parents both work sounds like no education to me. I think the montessori approach for early ed, a classical approach for elementary when they are most interested in "getting it right", a social interaction approach combined with increased rigor in middle school preparing them for high school which should combine multiple approaches including vocational education on the high school campus so that children have options to keep academic and vocational strains in their education plan.
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Audrey Hill
Posted over 4 years ago
How can we empower kids to reshape the education system? *A TEDActive Education Project Question*
The notion that privatizing education will solve education's problems assumes that the problem lies strictly with the school systems, that government run institutions are subject to more corruption than private ones, and that privatization always results in superior products through competition. First, the collapsing education infrastructure in poor communities does not mean that public schools are generally failing. Public education thrives in places where poverty is not an issue and privatization has not reduced the number of highly able children in the local school system. Secondly, privatization quietly encourages a system where children from empowered families benefit at the expense of children from disenfranchised families. Vouchers give the empowered family more resources toward a bill it can already pay and give disenfranchised families the imitation of choice through access to resources that are insufficient for real choice. Finally, It has not been my experience that privatization has been a universally positive force for improvment in the institutions that it already encompasses. Witness the health insurance industry, for one. Privatization largely benefits the profiteers, leaving the "client" to struggle for access to resources that are designated to profit. While some people enjoy the thought that all things will be possible if only they can be enjoined by profit, the loss of a free, publicly funded education for all only serves those who already have options.