Brianna Toler

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Comments & conversations

186782
Brianna Toler
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
So I am a vegetarian and would not eat bugs. But I am a strict vegetarian and I ask what is in all my foods before I eat them. I want and need to know before I put it in my body. Some semi-vegetarian people would be just fine with eating bugs. Others who are like me would not. If you are looking to try and market this as a viable thing to add to a vegetarian diet without offending the vegetarian community in general I think it will be difficult. I view insects as animals just as I view fish, poultry, and meat. The comment that with eating bugs there is a more humane way to KILL them is not going to go over well. You are killing animals to eat them and strict vegetarians and vegans will see it as such. I would focus on marketing to the meat eating populations and comparing insects to cattle as I think for those that eat meat... eating bugs may be a good way to go.
186782
Brianna Toler
Posted about 1 year ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
I am a vegetarian and I eat tofu such as other vegetarians. I think it a great source of protein for those that choose this diet. I certainly do not want to get into a debate on whether meat eaters or vegetarians have more of an impact on the land but I do want to respond. Cattle and other livestock are just as damaging if not more so than soy. We have over 2 billion cattle on this planet filling up land that could be used for crops and producing a ton of methane that is contributing to global warming. Rainforests and other areas have been converted to land for livestock which is destroying biodiversity in these ares. On top of having to have the land to raise the cattle and other livestock we have to feed them as well. About 800 million people could be fed instead of this feed going to livestock. With all this said. I definitely eating bugs is a viable and reasonable place to take humans. Being a vegetarian I personally will not partake in the eating of the bugs but I think if we can reduce livestock and return to a more natural system than we have, we could greatly reduce the rapid speed of global warming and decrease so much destruction of the land.
186782
Brianna Toler
Posted over 1 year ago
Can urban beehives increase food production?
I think Urban beekeeping is a great possible solution to increasing pollination and keeping the food industry alive and thriving but there is this great stigma that bees are bad. I follow into that too. I dislike getting stung so I dislike the idea of bees. We need to somehow help the greater of the United States and the world recognize the impact and benefits of bees to reduce this negative stigma and then more people may be more receptive to having managed bee hives in urban settings. My boyfriend recently took a beekeeping class and wants to put a beehive in the backyard. I was resistant at first but now that I have read literature and read comments on this TED conversation I have changed my thinking and am now encouraging him to get the hive.
186782
Brianna Toler
Posted over 1 year ago
Will the Belo Monte Dam project on the Amazon River cause more harm to the environment or will it be a good source of energy for Brazil?
I feel like they are trying to go through with building this dam because they don't want to appear weak and back down. I can see no other reason for the Brazilian government to go through with the construction, changing the ecosystems, killing endemic species and displacing so many people especially with all the research that has been done regarding alternative choices. Does anyone else get this feeling?
186782
Brianna Toler
Posted over 1 year ago
Cats pose a serious threat to biodiversity: Why do we accept it? What should be done?
I agree with you and I said similar things in an earlier post. I did want to make one comment though.... We do already have a system in place to capture and spay/neuter stray and feral cats. I have helped participate in the program and a lot of good is done by this. We have seen the population of feral/stray cats reduced in areas where we did this. Volunteer vets do the procedures and college students provided a lot of the extra help as well as community members. If we could expand this program we could vastly decrease the wild population.
186782
Brianna Toler
Posted over 1 year ago
Cats pose a serious threat to biodiversity: Why do we accept it? What should be done?
I agree that there would be people who rebel against it as it is human nature but if we educate everyone as to why this is going into effect I feel like more people would be on the side that this is a good way to decrease the population of cats and why we need the decrease and the regulation. A handful of people breeding and making a black market on cats wouldn't affect the population that much. The problem I do see with this solution would be the price tag for regulation.... the trapping and neutering of the males.
186782
Brianna Toler
Posted over 1 year ago
Cats pose a serious threat to biodiversity: Why do we accept it? What should be done?
How is a shot going to be more effective or less money than spaying/neutering your cat? And we know that spaying and neutering is effective birth control. I do realize that my solutions would cost money as does every other solution we are coming up with in this conversation so we again to that idea of putting a monetary value on ecosystems. How much are we willing to lose versus how much are we willing to invest in saving.
186782
Brianna Toler
Posted over 1 year ago
Cats pose a serious threat to biodiversity: Why do we accept it? What should be done?
I'm not sure about taxing pet owners of cats. That doesn't seem like something the public would pass due to the amount of taxes we already have. Although... you could make the cost of cats from breeders and those from the humane societies slightly higher (adding in the tax that way so it is just a one time fee when you buy the pet). I also think that it would be hard to pass all of these ideas at once (in the United States at least) but if one part of it could be passed and then research done to show effectiveness the public may be more invested in the tax or other regulations regarding cats. As far as taking in your cat to get registered.... You are right... Some people would simply oppose to this and others would call it government conspiracy to get ahold of personal information but as time goes on and breeders, humane societies, and citizens bring in their pets to get registered more and more will be registered. I do not imagine all of this happening overnight. It would take people a while to warm up to the ideas (and even to the fact that something needs to be done) as well as take an abundant amount of time to get all of these pets registered and the current strays and feral cats spayed and neutered.
186782
Brianna Toler
Posted over 1 year ago
Cats pose a serious threat to biodiversity: Why do we accept it? What should be done?
I agree that something needs to be done to cut down the amount of killing that domestic cats do but I personally love cats and would not give them up. I have a few ideas about how to regulate the cat population (a few of which have been touched on earlier in this conversation).... 1. We could make all domestic cats that are pets indoor animals only. There is really no good way to regulate this but I think more people would comply with this if it was law and if they were educated about why the law was going into effect. 2. I think that cat owners should have to register their cat through a vet's office (with the vet reporting to a regional or national database). I see this registration involving having a chip injected into the cat as the registration number. 3. Regulated domestic breeding - These people would have to apply for a license to breed and there could be a limited number of licenses per year per area (as they do with hunting tags). The kittens would all have to be reported and chiped by the vet after they are born and before they are sold to new owners. 4. More funds and resources allotted to spay/neuter clinics for feral cats. With more resources and domestic cats being kept indoors we could drastically reduce the number of these cats roaming the streets. 5. And finally, if the owner has no intent of breeding their cat they must spay/neuter them by a deadline. Does any of this sound feasible?
186782
Brianna Toler
Posted over 1 year ago
Purell now, Bacteri-ell later?
I definitely agree with you about finding the more natural ways of accruing the biodiversity of microbes that we need. Why try and use synthetic ways when a natural way is there?