Paddy Reynolds

Someone is shy

Paddy hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

Noface
Paddy Reynolds
Posted over 1 year ago
Burning one hectare equals 6000 car emissions?
I live in Australia and pondered the same question. When I couldn't get an answer, I asked Bob Carter bob.carter@jcu.edu.au Bob is a professor of geology and very outspoken on the subject of climate change and AGW. He very kindly replied saying he would look it up. Why not ask him.
Noface
Paddy Reynolds
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
Locavore Localvore. I agree with you, when people start thinking they are infallible, then its curtains for them. I don't think Allan Savory is saying he is infallible. He is certainly saying that after 50 years of trialing a farming method on 15 million hectares globally, he has come to the conclusion that technology as we know it, fire and partial rest are not the answer to arresting progressive desertification of grasslands. The facts are that the grasslands in semi dry regions, which make up a huge part of the globe,are degrading. Rather than have you make derogatory statements about cowboys turning the planet into a cow pasture, I want to set you a challenge. Everybody knows that as the global population increases, so too does the demand for food. I'm sure you will agree that if demand for food is going up and productive farmland is degrading resulting in more farmers leaving the land then are returning to it, we all have a problem. If that was your challenge, how would you address the issue of food insecurity?
Noface
Paddy Reynolds
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
The following is an extract from "The Vatican's reaction to Galileo Galilei" by Mary Bellis, About.com Guide "For Galileo Galilei, saying that the Earth went around the Sun changed everything since he was contradicting the teachings of the Church. While some of the Church's mathematicians wrote that his observations were clearly correct, many members of the Church believed that he must be wrong. " Galileo died in 1642 under house arrest because he challenged conventional wisdom. So too with Savory. He, like Galileo, is challenging conventional wisdom. While its interesting conversation to argue the sequester ability of grasslands vs forests on a global scale, all Mr Savory is saying is that if grasslands are subjected to partial rest, they degrade. The argument is about the definition of "overgrazing" Conventional wisdom holds that it has to do with the number of animals that graze on a grassland. Savory argues that is not the number of animals that desertify the landscape but the number of bites to any single plant. Remember, Savory ordered the culling of the elephants because he was acting on conventional wisdom. His work over 50 years shows that it is possible to reverse degradation with animal impact (which flies in the face of conventional wisdom) His hypothesis on climate change is that if this regeneration occurs on a big enough scale, it could have a beneficial effect on climate change. As far as I am concerned, the academics who argue that he is wrong(and I accept their right to do so) are themselves wrong. (Just like the church was wrong about Galileo) Anybody who has applied the holistic management principles knows this. There are practitioners managing 15 million hectares who all know that soil microbes increase, water cycling improves, biodiversity increases and new topsoil is built. Whats wrong with that. If the big picture improves climate change, wouldn't that be something?
Noface
Paddy Reynolds
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
HI Kevin, I can only speak for Southern Africa. Allan's own work is done in Zimbabwe. I know that part of the world well. Tim, who farms in a cool climate with high rainfall and a very low brittleness score will have very different experience to anyone in southern africa..I don't think Allan is suggesting that one pasture-ize the planet. He is saying that those parts of the globe that are grasslands or were grasslands can be improved. He is also showing that even in extreme cases of bare soil, grass can be restored. THe end result of all these activites is the activation of the liquid carbon pathway which stimulates the soil microbes,. This perpetual motion self fertilizer lays down topsoil.. Fertile soil will grow trees if that is what is appropriate. Christine Jones PhD is quoted as saying that failure to learn how to rapidly build fertile topsoil may yet prove to be the greatest oversight of this civilization. www.amazingcarbon.com.au . Regarding the costs, of course the land and the stock require capital expenditure.I am assuming you are not a farmer, because for those of us who are, know that utilizing the accepted farming practices of say the past 50 years, input costs have become financially unsustainable. In Australia since 1976, farmers have walked off 20% of designated commercial farmland, because they can't make a living.By "free" Allan means that his methods harness the sun, the water, the minerals....all for free.What you get are healthy soils which grow healthy grass, trees, vegetable etc. The animals health improves. In practice, not only does this farming practice improve the ecology, it makes ranching , in my case, cattle and sheep, profitable. All good thing
Noface
Paddy Reynolds
Posted over 1 year ago
Is there a "breaking point" in the number of animals and land needed?
Richard is right. There is a system to control the numbers. Too many will indeed be damaging. If you are interested, suggest you look up www.holisticresults.com.au Bruce Ward was Australia's version of Allan Savory, having been coached by Allan. He was an outstanding teacher. Sadly, Bruce passed away last year. His son David has very generously made his notes and video's available on a website as a legacy to his amazing dad..
Noface
Paddy Reynolds
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
Hi Tim, I think the extreme examples of animal impact reversing the deserts serve to demonstrate the power of this "tool". Certainly, here in Australia, I don't know of people engaging in this interesting practice, ie closing cattle up in a defoliated area. What we are doing, because we live in a dry climate( unlike you in UK) is trying to activate natures free gifts viz the 4 ecosystems, the mineral cycle, the solar cycle, the water cycle and community dynamics www.holisticresults.com.au will explain it all. Alan is talking about Africa. I grew up in Africa and I can assure you the landscape there is very different to the lush pastures you take as normal. Historically the tribal system measures a mans wealth by the number of cattle he owns. Bridal prices are set in cattle numbers. Each night all cattle are enclosed in a lion proof yard to be let out each day to graze. Young boys have the task of holding the cattle together in a herd. These cattle are used to long periods of what you and I consider to be starvation. I agree with you, cattle accustomed to high energy diet will break out of anywhere. But these cattle tolerate hunger. Reading the comments of others suggest that this is a system designed specifically to reverse deserts. As has already been said, it is designed to stop any degradation taking place in productive grassland. What makes it attractive is that it teaches us to improve our pastures ecologically, the increased productivity makes farming financially viable and the implementation is free!!!
Noface
Paddy Reynolds
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
David Briske is a university Professor His reseach interests include Rangeland Stewardship,Ecosystem Assessment, Social-ecological Systems, Global Change Biology Why is it that academics think that by brandishing their very fine credentials, we, mere mortals, must accept that you are right? You say "global rangeland degradation is often a consequence of increasing human and livestock populations, land fragmentation, and changes to land tenure, rather than a case of improper scientific information." Alan Savory says you are wrong. What makes you right and him wrong? Can you explain why it is that on your back door, namely the south west of Texas, despite all the interventions recommended by your academia, and all the money supplied by government, you cannot reverse the desertification? You say "He has advocated the ecological benefits of concentrated livestock grazing for over 30 years and they have gained little acceptance and are unsupported by experimental evidence." I thought he said he had 15 million hectares of experimental evidence. On my mere 268 hectares, when I diligently adhered to your precribed philosophy, all I got was progressive land degradation, more vet bills and increasing fertiliser costs. When I started to implement his method, because they facilitate the natural ecosystems and do not require multiple peer reviewed publications, I, like all those other 15 million hactare people, experienced a complete reversal of the the negative trend not only environmentally, but financially. Not to mention the massive improvement this permeates into our experience of life. If you are so confident that you are right, why don't you come on TED and we will listen to your talk about how you are reversing this global disaster and feeding starving families. For those of you out there who make up the 15 million hectares,please take minute to write David a note and let's help educate him about the real world.