mary T

Someone is shy

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Comments & conversations

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mary T
Posted about 2 years ago
My observable universe
I just don't understand time at all. I don't see why it's all one way, and I don't see why it has to be that way. It seems to me that everything is now, all time is now, and we just can't see it somehow. I really wonder whether our brains are just not developed enough yet. Maybe we are the Neanderthals to some future version of us that will be able to see all time at once. That makes sense to me. Also, it makes my head spin. Plus, if I could see all time all of the time, I'd check out a few things that I'm personally convinced about nut can't prove.
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mary T
Posted about 2 years ago
Do state governments sufficiently regulate fracking of natural gas?
Yikes. But, I suppose the government recognizes a public interest that overrides property ownership. Come to think of it, I'm pretty sure we're almost the only country in the world that recognizes private ownership of mineral interests. I think elsewhere the government owns below the surface. I'm not too upset over any of the ownership aspects, but I do worry about the water, etc. Anyway, that's interesting about Texas. Do they frack there, the shale layer? Or is more the types of wells they show in the movies? Thanks so much for responding!
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mary T
Posted about 2 years ago
Why are or why aren't food stamps considered in investment?
People whose incomes were low enough could buy stamps, which were like a book of coupons. They would go to the grocery store, and use the stamps in place of money. Stamps had a value (for food) that were higher than the amount paid for them. If you were poor and thus eligible for welfare benefits (cash assistance), you would stretch your money by using some of that cash for food stamps. If you were in a grocery checkout line and someone used food stamps, everyone knew they were poor, and knew they probably received welfare benefits. It was a shameful thing. The food stamp program is run by the Dept. of Agriculture (a federal agency), and originally was seen as a way to get surplus farm products to the poor. The welfare (cash assistance) programs were run by the Human Services departments of the various states. Now, they don't use coupons. It looks like a credit card and is replenished every month. It's not so obvious at the grocery store, so it's less shameful. The types of food you can buy are limited. For example, you can't buy prepared foods. So, you can buy a raw chicken but not a roasted chicken. They can't buy cigarettes or liquor, etc. They have to be poor. They may receive welfare benefits (very small cash assistance) or federal welfare (supplemental social security benefits, about $732 monthly), they might receive energy assistance (for their power bills), they get medical assistance (limited health care), and they might live in public or subsidized housing. Some people always imagine the welfare families as living off the fat of the land. In reality, they almost always have an impediment that keeps them from working, like a disability. Children get a lot of the benefits. I know many people who receive benefits and I wouldn't want to trade places with any of them. It's a depressing, dead end way to live. The system needs improvement and so forth, but it's for poor chidlren, and their poor uneducated parents. Very yucky way to live.
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mary T
Posted about 2 years ago
Do state governments sufficiently regulate fracking of natural gas?
Where I am, Pennsylvania, I have heard the agents for the oil and gas companies tell people that it doesn't matter if they consent or not, to the fracking. They claim that they can just drill on the neighboring piece, then set off explosives, free the gas, and then capture it. I understand that, under our law, gas is like a wild animal -- the person who captures it, owns it. But I can imagine that the destruction of the shale layer (to free the gas) might be challenged at some point. The shale layer may be out of sight, but it's still mine, under my land. It seems incorrect to think someone can basically stand off to the side of my land and destroy it. Of course, that may be a challenge that noone ever makes. The land I own alone, I didn't sign a lease. So maybe my descendants will fight about it.
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mary T
Posted about 2 years ago
Do state governments sufficiently regulate fracking of natural gas?
Well, that's a good point. Fracking might destroy water. The gas companies adamantly deny that, of course. I'm aware of a couple of law suits relating to possible polluting of farm ponds and damage to livestock. It's possible that they might lead to discovery of facts and information. Whether it will ever be publicized, who can say yet? It does seem as though the legislature is unwilling to investigate - as you say, when it comes to money, everybody wants some and everybody needs it. I'm sure it would be tough, to be the state representative who digs for answers when everyone in your district needs stuff that money can buy. Actualy, i don't know of any state represrntatives who are digging for answers, come to think of it.
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mary T
Posted about 2 years ago
We are the youth of Pushtu family, Khan family, and we want change.
Yikes. So, it's not just a matter of offering education to girls. It's also necesary to provide safety. Well, good for you for expressing a desire to change. What do your mother and sisters think about it? I suspect the answer ultimately will lie with the women, since it's their lives that are at risk.
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mary T
Posted about 2 years ago
Preventing Cholera in rural Zimbabwe - Use of empty containers as taps outside blair-toilets
Thanks for your response. It makes it clearer to me. I think I understand the issue, trying to interrupt the contamination chain. Three thoughts come to mind --Firstly, I've read a little bit about the cholera epidemic that hit London in the 1830s, and about how John Snow mapped the incidences of cholera and thus discovered that a particular well was contaminated. So, my first thought is -- the source of the hand-washing water must be clean. Ground water can be contaminated. So, the water itself has to be purified. I am curious - why isn't rain water used? If I'm not mistaken, rain water is purified by the process of nature. My second thought may seem very silly but what you describe brings to mind movies and television. In the introduction of a show called "Petticoat Junction," there are young women showering below a cistern of rain water. They pull a chain, the cistern tips, and water pours out to rinse them. Same concept, but yours is a smaller scale. Lots of old western movies show this type of device. Third and final idea -- I suppose it's ridiculous, but hand sanitizers, are they available? The kind we stick in our purses, or the larger models that are installed on the walls of hospitals and other public buildings. I don't know about this idea, but I thought I'd mention it. I wish you well. Mary
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mary T
Posted about 2 years ago
Uniting Korea
Hi, Wonjun Jeong. I'm not sure I understand the purpose. What is the benefit to South Korea to uniting with North Korea? I get that it is vitally important to remove the threat of war. Is uniting of the Koreas the only way to achieve that goal? Does North Korea have anything within its borders or culture that would benefit South Korea? I think the best way to seduce someone into being on my side is to give gifts. Is it possible to smuggle or air drop food, clothing, books, etc. into the country, so that the people come to desire the things that South Korea has to give? Is North Korea open at all to allowing cultural exchanges? Penetrating the environment of an adversary, introducing pleasant attractions to divide the loyalties of the subordinates, and being open to learning what, if anything, would flow as a benefit from them to you -- those are the broad ideas I have. Best wishes, Mary
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mary T
Posted about 2 years ago
Preventing Cholera in rural Zimbabwe - Use of empty containers as taps outside blair-toilets
Hi, Emmanuel, I don't completely understand the question. What is a blair-toilet? Maybe, like what I would know as an outhouse, or outdoor shed with a latrine pit? And how does water get into the container? Is it rain water? But how d0es it get in, if there is a lid? Is there an opening for water to pour out? I would assume that the string itself becomes contaminated, whether by feet or hands or whatever. Anyway, sorry I don't understand. It's interesting, and I can kind of visualize it, but not sure. Best wishes, Mary