Rachel Hubbard

Springfield, OR, United States

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186786
Rachel Hubbard
Posted about 2 years ago
Buggin' Out: Urban Bug Farming for the Future
I agree with you Cori, but I also think the over exploitation of insects is going to be inevitable if we start producing them as a food source because it will be fast and cheap. In the U.S. we kind of already do use bugs as a food source. Chocolate covered ants and chocolate covered grasshoppers can be bought at specialty stores and they're actually not that bad. I think that bug farms can be extremely beneficial in our diets once people get over the gross factor and realize that bugs can taste pretty good. As children most of us have probably eaten our fair share of insects, I know I have. It wasn't gross to us then, so why does it become so gross as we grow older?
186786
Rachel Hubbard
Posted about 2 years ago
Can urban beehives increase food production?
There's a lack of understanding what they do for us and also people are afraid of wasps and hornets.When the conversation of bees comes up those are the first ones that come to mind. I think that once people start to understand that honey bees are docile creatures unlike their relatives than they'll lessen their fear of them. It all starts with education.
186786
Rachel Hubbard
Posted about 2 years ago
Can urban beehives increase food production?
I agree Clinton. When most people think of bees the first thing that comes to their mind is wasps or hornets. Not all bees are aggressive and I think that once people start to understand the difference between them than maybe the need to harm them will lessen.
186786
Rachel Hubbard
Posted about 2 years ago
Will the Belo Monte Dam project on the Amazon River cause more harm to the environment or will it be a good source of energy for Brazil?
Paige, you bring up some great points. I think this is a case of people caring more about the money they're going to make off of the dam rather than the people and the area that are going to be affected. A similar issue is happening in china with there Three Gorges Dam. The building of this dam forced many people out of there homes, and threatened multiple plant and animal species. Currently the dam is causing landslides and endangering not only the people that live below but is also causing a decline in biodiversity. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=chinas-three-gorges-dam-disaster
186786
Rachel Hubbard
Posted about 2 years ago
Cats pose a serious threat to biodiversity: Why do we accept it? What should be done?
Brianna, I think that they would haveto end up applying a tax that would go to paying for the trapping and neutering of these felines. I also believe that both the males and females would have to be fixed because it will take a long time to not only neuter the babies being produced now, but also to catch and neuter all the domestic and feral cats that are already out there before they continue to reproduce.
186786
Rachel Hubbard
Posted about 2 years ago
Purell now, Bacteri-ell later?
I agree with you Shelby. Most of these remedies are for the high end clientele and what we need is a lost cost way of being able to get these microbes without breaking the bank. My thought is if we can get the microbes we need by spending more time outside than why not. Spending time in the outdoors is free and provides may health benefits. Many companies have came out with ways of getting probiotics like in yogurt, drinks and even in pills that people can take. It seems like people are covering the internal microbes, but not the ones that live on the surface of our bodies. I think until a way of replenishing them on our bodies is found then maybe we just need to use old school techniques and go back outside.