Dev Green

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Dev Green
Posted over 1 year ago
The debate about Graham Hancock's talk
How passive are otherwise intelligent people willing to be to accept this censorship and spin? For me, it's not easy to walk away from an institution that's helped me grow. But the censorship, the coverup, the spin, and the bait-and-switch tactics are negatives I hadn't imagined as part of the TED organization. If stifling rational inquiry is the byproduct of the organization's structure or some hidden plank of its mission, seems like it's time to build new.
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Dev Green
Posted over 1 year ago
The debate about Graham Hancock's talk
TED organization, though for years a magnificent resource [and I have to say, an icon for me], is now quacking like antique establishment. I'm reading THE INQUISITION AND THE MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD, and the censorship events that launched this debate quack a lot like Inquisition. With crowd-source funding and other social media, given TED's move toward orthodoxy, why not...step away? Why not fire up a new platform? Why not let the commercial interests keep what seems to be a tightly-held brand, and grow something truly independent? It's so much easier to do now than when TED started. Why not start something new, and stay independent of corporate funding to be free of corporate influence? Repeat: crowd sourcing for funding and promotion are making revolutions of every scale happen. Why not start something new? Let TED be the corporate product its boardroom and some of its local presenters want it to remain --and invite the local presenters, authors, thinkers, and community who see through the spin and want a platform that isn't compromised lead the migration...
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Dev Green
Posted over 1 year ago
The debate about Graham Hancock's talk
How to get an alternative to TED going? How about a Kickstarter campaign? 1.Set up FaceBook page with very brief, but not snarky, self-evident 3 bullet mission statement to start the fire. Naturally, some full-on mission statement can be drafted more globally and exhaustively, over other campfires at a much later date...by which time, such windy balderdash will no longer be needed. 2.Launch Kickstarter Campaign to generate micro-funding. 3.Subscribe to one of the new client relations management services in the cloud, integrating em, vm, texting,social media to make sure there's coordinated, ongoing follow-up and outreach to all respondents. 4.Sign up some prominent scientists, philosophers, inventors as Friends Of, who help build brand and offer their own networks to swell the tribe list of The New TED Talks Alternative...then serve as early days presenters. 5.Run a naming campaign on FB. 6.Support FB naming campaign with Tweeting and major media press release. 7.Run a Google Hangout Session, inviting...the world to co-create the Thinking Person's TED Alternative. 8.Secure an endorsement from the ACLU, and quote it everywhere. 9.Get a lawyer to write a great disclaimer highlighting the lovely difference between the presentation of discussion about an act and the act itself, and add a salient bit about the protection of public discourse in the US as a for- instance. Post disclaimer not-in-small-print, everywhere.
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Dev Green
Posted over 1 year ago
The debate about Graham Hancock's talk
The American Taliban --that's where I was brought up-- under absolutist imperatives strictly reenforced in every sermon, Sunday School lesson, church activity, and at every prayer at every meal at home, is hard at work 24/7, preaching and teaching millions of Americans to devalue education, science, and the most dreaded liberty of all, Free Thinking. Also devalued by today's American Fundamentalist Christian Taliban where I spent 20-odd years inside, are the arts [demonized as Satanic secularism and the product of demons acting on the human mind], basic human rights, civil society, and psychological or consciousness inquiry in any form. When one realizes that the majority of seats in The House of Representatives, plus many governorships and school boards are held by public officials openly endorsing or practicing most of these anti-questioning, absolutist and religionist belief systems' principles, the importance of a TED Talks organization, at least according to its original mission, becomes increasingly crucial and cherished by so many of The Rest of Us. I finally found liberation and awakening via college studies and the help of cautiously, thoughtfully taken psychedelics to break through decades of extreme, reductionist, absolutist, and it must be said, totalitarian, programming. So imagine my shock when I heard about this TED Talks censorship, which seems to represent another step toward Talibanization of the American mind, and censorship of both entire fields of valuable inquiry and the thoughtful visionaries who navigate beyond established paradigms. As apparently many of us understood it, the wrap-around functionality of TED's mission was to eliminate from the Talks and their after-market products, both commercialization and abject chaos...rather than controversy. And after all, TED Talks has already featured Rev. Billy Graham. Or is it time for a new brand?