Jim White

Someone is shy

Jim hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

Noface
Jim White
Posted over 1 year ago
Sugata Mitra: Kids can teach themselves
Don't Montessori schools depend on well-paid, skilled teachers in order to function? The first bit of correlation that was shown here is that teachers in remote areas don't want to be there and we can make a safe inference that the quality of education suffers as a result. There is no plausible source, at least for a generation or two, for teachers such as Montessori schools employ to staff schools for the billions of the world's children in poor, remote areas (even if the money to pay them was available, which it isnt'). If you say that there is a connection between the Montessori principles and those that Mitra espouses, then dandy, but that doesn't even begin to address the idea of self-organizing educational systems that depend on nothing more than a suitable computer and children in order to function.
Noface
Jim White
Posted over 1 year ago
How can SOLEs be implemented without causing students to shun necessary but "boring" skills?
The skills on your list are only in fact "necessary" or "boring" if learners deem them so. Children will either learn them because they don't find them boring or they find them necessary to accomplish something else they find interesting. The task of a SOLE facilitator is to curate materials that are rich targets for the children's curiosity. Consider the case that Mitra presented in which the children learned about microbiology from material written in English. Here was a task that was so hard that the children received little inherent reward from studying it - one of the "boring" skills situations you're concerned about. The solution was to arrange for a teacher (who knew nothing of the subject or computer skills herself) to pay attention to the children and praise them for pursuing such a difficult problem. With such encouragement children will succeed in solving even ridiculously difficult problems.