Rich Robert

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Rich Robert
Posted over 1 year ago
The debate about Rupert Sheldrake's talk
Mr. Sheldrake suggests that science itself needs inquiry and TED recoils in shock. In the process, TED dismisses and degrades Mr. Sheldrake's lifetime work and efforts with little more evidence than the say so of a so-called anonymous review panel (isn't this how totalitarian states operate?). Did Mr. Sheldrake break any rules? No. Was he rude? No. Was he invited to speak by an authorized group? Yes? Was the video of Mr. Sheldrake in conformance to all rules? Yes. So what was the crime that he was treated so? His crime was that he ruffles feathers of those who disagree with him, and since science decides what can or cannot be said about science, Mr. Sheldrake is the automatic loser. There is one and only one thing that TED, if it has an ounce of ethics left in its organization, can do and that is to immediately apologize to Mr. Sheldrake, reinstate the video in question, admit to its rude behavior and move on. If TED wishes to change the rules of what it is admissible in the future, it is free to do so. It is a private venture with its own agenda. But to treat Mr. Sheldrake in this manner is infuriating and more than this - simply unfair and unjust.
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Rich Robert
Posted over 1 year ago
The debate about Rupert Sheldrake's talk
Rupert Sheldrake is a clear and brilliant thinker who is not only challenging scientific dogma but is also challenging us to think for ourselves. I am chagrined but not shocked that TED has allied itself in ostracizing those such as Shelldrake who do not go along with the crowd. That is the way business has been transacted since ancient times. Yes, science is about inquiry as long as the inquiry is not about science itself. This attempt to undermine Sheldrake's work has nothing to do with science. This has everything to do with habit. A habit called protecting turf and power.