Hans Bohlin

Linkoeping, Sweden

About Hans

Languages

English, Norwegian, Swedish

Areas of Expertise

Navigation - GNSS and Inertial, Simulation & modeling

I'm passionate about

Physics, Evolutionary History, Earth Science, Climate Change, Sustainability

Universities

Linkoping University

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Hans Bohlin
Posted about 3 hours ago
Yuval Noah Harari: What explains the rise of humans?
Yes i did. But I failed to see any clear connection between the hypothetical "Brain Catastrophes" and the statement "out of control". We are who we are, including all evolutionary "infections" and including the both brain half's capabilities. If we are "out of control", we still is the top dog of the ecosystem, so Yuval's statement of "control" still seems very reasonable (if you interpret control as I did above).
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Hans Bohlin
Posted about 4 hours ago
Yuval Noah Harari: What explains the rise of humans?
Well, "control" might be the wrong word. We (= the collective humankind) is the top dog in the ecosystem that has manage to occupy all available biological niches and lives in almost all of earths land environments and land masses. Many collective decisions we have the power to make, decides the life and death of other species and even the survival of the whole biosphere. No other animal have had that power (maybe with the exception of pandemic viruses or bacteria, but these lacks the capability to make any consciousness decision). That power does not mean that we use our control wise or even morally. So one may ask the question - who/what controls us? I find that an important piece of that riddle has it roots in Yuval's explanation - we are controlled by our own imaginary ideas. Ideas so strong that we often seems to have extremely difficult abandon, even in presence of danger.
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Hans Bohlin
Posted about 7 hours ago
Yuval Noah Harari: What explains the rise of humans?
I agree. Yuval Noah Harari reasoning should be complement with a few more factors in order to explain the "success" of Homo Sapiens. The ones that you describe, accumulation of knowledge, in both the space and time domains, are by Professor David Christian (Historian) denoted as Collective Learning (See his book Maps of Time or http://www.ted.com/talks/david_christian_big_history#t-793685). One of the features of collective learning is that it is amplified by effective networking. That is; the more nodes in the network (that is number of humans) and the more connections between the nodes (simplified: denser population), the more knowledge is accumulated by time. Of cause collective learning also requires a sophisticated and precise way of communication, and that is human language. This mechanism is of cause even more powerful when it comes to written languages since this rely open up both the time dimensions and long spacial communications. And by modern technologies like radio and Internet the network amplification becomes very high (only limit by the human languages/communication bandwidth). I like David Christian idea/explanation since it makes a lot of sense. But in the same time I have felt that David Christian collective learning is only a partial explanation, that is missing some crucial factors. I believe that Yuval Noah Harari have manage to make a great contribution towards a more complete picture by identifying our more of less unique capability to imagination and put it in a socio-historical context.
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Hans Bohlin
Posted about 10 hours ago
Yuval Noah Harari: What explains the rise of humans?
I do not think he is a "genocidal elitist", rather the opposite. Having read his book and watch a few other talks (you can easily find them on youtube) it is clear to me that his agenda is to bring up a public discussion of a possible (?) social paradigm shift the humankind is facing (caused by a likely AI/automation revolution). I guess he hopes for awareness, discussion and ideas. His warning is actually in the same direction as Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk by others, open letter concerning AI. See http://futureoflife.org/home (and other websites that comments on it).
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Hans Bohlin
Posted about 13 hours ago
Yuval Noah Harari: What explains the rise of humans?
Dear Yuval Noah Harari, Thanks for your extremely fascinating and refreshing book; Sapiens - a Brief History of Humankind. It is definitely the best I ever read on the subject. I also love your colorful language and vivid style that boarders to irony and sarcasm. :) Just by curiosity, in the books beginning you sweep of Cosmology/Physics, Chemistry and Biology as not being part of the subject History in just a few sentences. Is this intended as a small quip to David Christians*, Fred Spiers and others ambitions with "Big History"? (* For everyone that are not familiar with "Big History" I could recommend http://www.ted.com/talks/david_christian_big_history)
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Hans Bohlin
Posted about 1 month ago
Donald Hoffman: Do we see reality as it is?
In the great book "Sapiens: A Brief history of humankind", Yuval Noah Harari implies that Buddhism is almost an atheistic religion or is at least a religion there gods aren't very important. Reading between the lines in the book I got the feeling that he as a scientist/historian favors a lot of philosophical ideas from Buddhism. I got the some what strange idea that maybe Buddhism and modern sciences could fully coexists, without any contradictions at all. A sort of union between reason and spirituality, something that world community seems to suffer from a lack of - like the quote "faith without reason is blind, reason without faith is lame"* (* I have tried to find the the origin of the last quote, but it seems that there exists many suggestions who first stated that, if you know for sure, please enlighten me)
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Hans Bohlin
Posted 8 months ago
Will Marshall: Tiny satellites show us the Earth as it changes in near-real-time
Well, I guess that the "debris" act more as a factor that contribute to global cooling rather than global warming since the debris reflects the suns radiation away. Putting out a lot of debris in form of many small mirrors is actually a sf suggestion to counter the global warming (that is extremely many mirrors). However, concerning the present amount of debris in space, the cooling factor will totally insignificant.
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Hans Bohlin
Posted 8 months ago
Will Marshall: Tiny satellites show us the Earth as it changes in near-real-time
I just say wow. This should have a major impact on may aspects of our global society, and from my point of view to the good. In some aspects is has even greater impact than GPS and other GNSS systems. For instance I can Imagen a new type of journalist that spends all his day analyzing and verifying information on all kinds of disasters and conflict zones. Concerning medium and large scale military operations it would be almost impossible to hide. If truly free global access for anyone, I wounder if this wouldn't be a real major game changer concerning geopolitics. An aspect that isn't addressed in this talk is political control. Even if under civil/company control, pressure for local and regional black out, at least temporal, due to US and NATO military operations, should be expected. Information is power and global near real time information of this kind even more so. I in all favor for this to be truly free global access for anyone. Power to the people :P
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Hans Bohlin
Posted 8 months ago
Will Marshall: Tiny satellites show us the Earth as it changes in near-real-time
If the small satellites are launched from the space station with a rather small velocity, as viewed in the videos, their orbit will be rather low. Since there exits a small atmospheric drag at these altitudes they will by time loose altitude and eventually return to earth and burn up, i guess in a few years. So concerning the "space junk" issue, this should be none existing one. Since they are really small and cheap, I see no reason for "recycle" the either. I guess collecting them should be rather difficult and very expensive. I guess the way to go are to replace them one by one as the drop out.