MA Crawford

Someone is shy

Ma hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

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MA Crawford
Posted about 1 year ago
Judy MacDonald Johnston: Prepare for a good end of life
From my experience, you can never plan for everything concerning this subject....but the more you plan, the more prepared you are for the unexpected. And the more open family/friends can be about confronting the fact of death and even unexpectedly early death from accident etc, the more stress is removed from the survivors/trustees. It is delicate, but find a way to broach the subject, and once broached keep the lines open for changes in attitude and possibilties.
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MA Crawford
Posted over 1 year ago
Dan Pallotta: The way we think about charity is dead wrong
I understand and sympathize with the concept, but also feel that we in America are also having the conversation of greed in the realm of CEO and high management income - that the scale of their compensation versus that of their workers is inequitable. I would not like to see non-profits begin to participate in this inequity.
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MA Crawford
Posted over 1 year ago
We have left out an even smaller group from the discussion - asexual people - people who are not atrracted by either sex or the act itself.
Tillet seemed to be attempting to see how people defined themselves sexually, not scientifically. I was commenting on the fact that it seemed that inclusive as she was, she could perhaps consider another box as she goes forward. It would be interesting to see. And I don't necessarily agree that because you would accept them, that they are accepted. I a society in which sex sells everything, would you feel comfortable admitting you defined yourself as asexual? It takes just as much courage as to admit you are homosexual.
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MA Crawford
Posted over 1 year ago
We have left out an even smaller group from the discussion - asexual people - people who are not atrracted by either sex or the act itself.
I am not a scientist, so you have me there. However, it has been my experience that both science and society overlook possibilities, especially when (as in the possibility I am referring to) the group has no "bling" and can generate no social agenda. I have never heard asexuality discussed, so there doesn't even seem to be a box to check,Therefore the group remains invisible, and without context in the society for their experience other than being defined as ill. Anytime science and society exclude a group through ignorance or willfulness, possibilities are overlooked, case in point when a great deal of medical research was done only with male subjects and results were assumed to be appropriate for females also. Has anyone ever even asked the question, or is it an assumption that everyone is born with a sexual drive? Just asking as a layman and someone who has come across the question and never heard it discussed. Also it is my first time here, so if I am being inappropriate, my apologies.