Gerry Lyon

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Gerry Lyon
Posted 10 months ago
Martin Rees: Can we prevent the end of the world?
Anyone who has driven on a freeway or highway, with a few notable exceptions, understands the miracle of how well we play together. Sure, there is always the slim probability that someone will behave in an untoward manner. However, the good news is that we drive on the freeway and see very little untoward behavior. That is what we experience in general. However, what we experience in specialized institutions such as congress is much more serious. This points out that we need to place some kinds of limits on how people in such institutions must behave. For example, on the freeway, we limit speed and driving behavior. Therefore, we should also limit congress in similar ways. For example, a representative is supposed to represent all constituents. It would seem to be appropriate to limit congressional behavior to the representation of all constituents. In the same way, it would also seem appropriate to restrict congressional behavior from serving special interests. While these two extremes may seem difficult to prove superficially, I believe we all know of congressional individuals for whom infractions of such laws would be easy to prove in a court of law. If humanity is going to enjoy this world for the many centuries to come, we must put in place such laws on a universal basis. Fortunately, we have the means to do so. We have to eliminate all those who oppose laws designed to ensure humanity's longevity, mainly via laws that make any anti-longevity behavior illegal. If we apply the illegality internationally, over time we can remove all of the despots who seek to do things that are anti-longevity. This brave, new world sits before us on a silver platter. All that is required is for us to fully embrace that world and make it ours.
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Gerry Lyon
Posted over 1 year ago
Paul Piff: Does money make you mean?
In America, we have decimated the folks who might otherwise speak out for the less fortunate, while encouraging those who will not speak out for the less fortunate. The cost has been severe. Today, we have huge numbers of stupid voters willing to give everything we have fought for back to those we struggled to take it from. Personally speaking, I am totally disgusted with the stupidity of many if not most of my fellow citizens. If this trend of abject stupidity continues, I will be forced to leave this country entirely. My work, in hi-tech, would have to leave with me, and contrary to what the stupid folks might beleive, such a mass exodus would leave a huge loss in it's wake. We are nearing the point of good-bye America by thousands and possibly millions of hi-tech workers.
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Gerry Lyon
Posted over 1 year ago
Frederic Kaplan: How to build an information time machine
An alias for extrapolation is fiction. Fiction is not fact and may not even be close to fact. To make extrapolation meaningful we would need a way to merge and blend various extrapolations. However, even if we blend hundreds or thousands of extrapolations, we would still need to consider who, when and why those extrapolations exist. We would need to let the reader/user pick from amongst these variables. Your use of the term "very good" is subjective and ambiguous. Reconstruction is contextual and interpretive. While certain facts may be known, other facts are partially or totally unknown. I don't know of any way to eliminate uncertainty to a degree where we can make explicit statements of fact about the past. Corroboration and synthesis must be considered as various forms of abstraction and conjecture, and never considered as fact. This is expecially true in our world where those of excessive means (the wealthy) can manipulate pretty much everything that isn't totally nailed down by sciences such as physics and math. Because of the universal ignorance of concepts such as logical fallacies, we must assume that the general public is not yet enlightened enough to predictably sift fact from fiction - or more correctly - true logic from false logic. Even though true versus false logic has been understood and codified for at least several thousand years, it is still a poorly understood subject universally - sometimes, even amongst the best and brightest. It appears that such ignorance may persist for many decades or centuries to come. Until we can depend upon a population able to spot and refute false arguments, we must put in place ofthe institutions to spot and eliminate fallacious rhetoric. Our courts and law making institutions are really all that stands between us and debilitating ignorance.
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Gerry Lyon
Posted over 1 year ago
What is my obligation to society and the world?
My daughter, adopted, is thirteen. Like you, she is incredibly beautiful. I worry about her. I would love for her to find some guy who loves her and whom she loves. So far, no luck. She seems to be attracted to guys much younger. They just seem to be unaware. What am I to do? Please help.
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Gerry Lyon
Posted almost 2 years ago
Chrystia Freeland: The rise of the new global super-rich
Work, in the form of human labor, is a rationing system. There are other rationing systems, such as dividends, value increase, royalties, rents, and so on. However, the reality is that most people exchange their daily toil for a slice of the pie - their ration. Wealth disparity exists due to a hidden rationing system! Undentified windfall profits due to a disparity in former systems that would otherwise ensure rationing maintains some reasonable relationship with previous practices. Unfortunately, wealth disparity can explode when, for example, some discovery changes the basic nature of what wealth is concieved as. An example might be the introduction of a technology that makes it possible for a non-human to perform tasks for which only humans were formerly capable. Ironically, this is the world in which we live. For example, media companies are able to provide automation tools that will perform, with even better accuracy and far more quickly, the chores that entire buildings full of humans formerly performed. A clear example is the chore of managing radio and television advertisements, including all of the practices that were introduced due to human error. Buildings in New York were formerly full of thousands of people performing what they called trafficking - not in drugs, but in advertisements. Today, 95% of that chore is totally automated by computerization. So, here we have an example where thousands of highly skilled workers have been displaced by one or more computer systems. This displacement of human talent by computerized talent is taking place on a massive scale that many people are unaware of. The degree of change is such that, unless a human possesses a combination of dexterity skills with technical skills that cannot be automated, their jjob and their place in the system of work (and rationing) will evaoprate into the world of computerized automation. Sadly, society and our institutions are slow to recognise this. What to do? Ask me
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Gerry Lyon
Posted almost 2 years ago
Nigel Marsh: How to make work-life balance work
Work is a rationing system. The system of work has been grossly unfair regarding compensation for many centuries. Greater rations often go to those with specialized knowledge. However, specialized knowledge is easily acquired by those for who greater education is readilly affordable. Those whose work is of a manual and non-specialized nature, if currently treated as of less value than specialized knowledge. The irony in this is that we have progressed to become a knowledge based society. As a result, those who are ready, willing and able to perform less specialized and more menial work, have actually become more scarce. Ironically,we live in an era where the old paradigm persists, even while the new paradigm surges to the forefront. For example, cheap manual field laborers are becoming ever more scarce. This is happening at the same time as more and more specialized workers are also becoming equally scarce. In other words, old paradigms of cheap labor and specialize labor, are becoming equally false. Why this is so is quite instructive. Cheap labor seeks to become ever more upwardly mobile by acquiring ever greater skills. At the same time, specialized skills are become increasingly specialized - and at rate that legitimate educational institutions are not yet equipped to recognize and offset. In other words, the demand for real upward mobility exceeds the ability of our educational facilites to meet that demand. This has happened in large part because educational facilities have been alllowd to get government money, with no requirement to prove that their graduate would immediately find a competitive job market. In fact, many educational facilities are still teaching specialization that is no longer considered to be special. For example, it is now considered normal, for potential job candidates to have basic Microsoft Office skills, regardless of their speciality. This expectation has occurred because Office functionality is embedded in most apps.
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Gerry Lyon
Posted over 2 years ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
Your proposition that providing statistics is of paramount importance overlooks the importance of initial disclosure. Some of the greatest scientific work was inspired by those who realized that what was needed was to set people free to imagine a totally different way to envision what might be. Leonardo da Vinci did not provide statistics, he drew pictures. Arthur C. Clark wrote novels, understanding that his sufficiently advanced technical vision would be seen by most as indistinguishable from magic. If your notion of science is analogous to religious literalism, providing you with more examples will always fail. Allan Savory has used his very limited time to provide a TED talk that conveys to most of us, the most inspirational bang for the time-limited buck. For those of us who realize how tfleeting our tenure of this tiny planet in a tiny corner of the universe may truly be, Allan Savory is lifting us from pre-concieved notions and showing us that a different solution promises a preferable future. My knowledge of agriculture tells me that the, so-called, anecdotal evidence, is enough to inspire me to explore further. Did you really expect his TED talk to provide irrefutable evidence in the form of reams of boring numbers? Any scientist worthy of the name understands the difference between hypothesis, preliminary evidence, conclusive evidence, peer reviewed evidence and inspiring a broad audience to investigate further.