Savory Institute

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Savory Institute
Posted 7 months ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
Mohan, the Savory Institute works with livestock managers all over the globe. We have launched an initial series of Savory Hubs, which act as training and learning dissemination sites. Our goal is to have 100 sites by 2025. These locally led and managed Hubs are utilizing curriculum created over decades of research and scientific investigation. Then the Hubs train the people in their own cultural context. Based on the values of the people and their economic resources, saving the castrated males for additional impact may be what's needed to achieve what we call their holistic context. Getting ample number of livestock is one of the hurdles to overcome in places where more impact is needed. With time though we can address that problem at the management level of a ranch and begin making decisions to promote the animal populations needed.
Noface
Savory Institute
Posted 7 months ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
Machines have been developed to try to mimic the role of animals and Allan has described this in the TED ebook available from this site. Millions of dollars were spent by governments and international agencies but all failed because no technology even imaginable can replace the role of animals and micro-organisms in their digestive tracts and soil. Technological solutions are both expensive and fail to scale up. We ned to embrace biological solutions. http://www.amazon.com/The-Grazing-Revolution-Radical-Earth-ebook/dp/B00H7JW4OW
Noface
Savory Institute
Posted 7 months ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
...In general when managing holistically it leads to understanding where livestock are not required and doing damage to the environment and society (as in tropical humid forests and certainly in South Africa's coastal forests such as Tsitsinkama) and where they are needed to reverse desertification and increase biodiversity as well as improving people's lives and economies. http://youtu.be/Vk3KHrqb7Uc
Noface
Savory Institute
Posted 7 months ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
No new knowledge. It is likely that any major change in the environment, can play a role in affecting climate and rainfall and that this is particularly likely when it involves wholesale destruction of forests such as the vast tropical forests of the Amazon and other areas. Tsitsinkama forest although far from the tropics is a coastal forest area subject to better annual distribution of humidity than you see just over the mountain range to the North of you. Unfortunately there is widespread belief that stopping deforestation, necessary as it is, will reverse global desertification and it's role in climate change. However this belief ignores evidence important to you in southern Africa. First most regions deserifying never were forests but were rather grasslands and savannas. Secondly large areas of forest, for example the "teak forests" in southern African countries (Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Namibia) that have not suffered deforestation are desertifying seriously - these forests lie in regions of very seasonal distribution of humidity. Where desertification is occurring is mainly in these regions of seasonal humidity. And as Allan showed in the TED talk, and explains more in the recently available TED E-book, this is brought about by change in the "effectiveness" of the available, albeit erratic, rainfall rather than change in rainfall resulting from too high a percentage of bare exposed soil between plants. And this in turn is brought about by too few grazing animals over-resting the land, while overgrazing plants as well as by burning. This is by far the greater cause of South Africa's seriously increasing droughts and floods and playing a greater part in any overall change in climate.
Noface
Savory Institute
Posted 9 months ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
We appreciate your feedback. We've had tremendous success on all 5 of the inhabitable continents. You'll see many comments even here from ranchers here that are using the method. We hear from people all over the globe that adopting holistic planned grazing saved their ranch. You bring up a good point about the wolves in Yellowstone. Our human brains aren't good at looking whole systems. We're wired to think in linear terms. Who would have thought that re-introducing a predator would make the whole system stronger. In the same way, who would have thought that introducing grazers to declining grasslands would make them better, but they do. The grasslands are as dependent on the grazers as the grazers are on eating the grass. It's a truly symbiotic relationship. You might look into checking out Dan Dagget's books Beyond the Rangeland Conflict and Gardeners of Eden. There are many case studies in there that show this method works. How Cows Save the Planet by Judith Schwartz is another good one. And here are two youtube clips that might clear a few more things up: http://youtu.be/FxenbOr1MO8 http://youtu.be/pIMmIvY5m2o
Noface
Savory Institute
Posted 9 months ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
The problem needs to be addressed locally but thinking on a global scale. Technological solutions rarely, if ever, are able to scale up to make a positive global ecological impact. As for small flocks, one technique is that herds can be combined in cooperative models to better impact the land in ways the mimic large herds of wild herbivores. With proper planning most producers will be able to increase their stocking capacity and produce more lbs of meat/fiber per acre/hectare.
Noface
Savory Institute
Posted 9 months ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
Adnen, Allan Savory's development of holistic planned grazing evolved from working with many people from the fringes of the Namib desert with no rainfall to the Alta Parana in Paraguay. No environment has yet been found other than the true deserts he is not talking about, where managing holistically as proposed has not resulted in improvement.
Noface
Savory Institute
Posted 10 months ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
And remember the fate of both water and carbon in the soil are tied and this is why Savory pointed out we are likely, using livestock properly managed, to return the atmosphere to pre-industrial carbon levels with none of the unintended consequences that accompany attempts to manage nature using technology. And in so doing feed people where crops cannot on most of the land while addressing the root cause of so much poverty, social breakdown and violence.
Noface
Savory Institute
Posted 10 months ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
n his talk Savory was so adamant that only livestock for practical reasons can reverse man-made desertification causing so much of today’s poverty, violence, emigration to European countries, etc. He was adamant in stating this was now the only option left to mankind because we are a tool-using animal. For instance we cannot even drink water without using some tool -glass or mug - unless we go and drink at a river. The only tools to manage our environment and climate change/desertification available to humans are technology in it’s many forms, fire or resting land. Something Savory discovered through training thousands of fellow scientists. Of these tools no technology even imaginable can maintain biological decay every year over two thirds of the land of the world. Fire is oxidation. Resting dead plant material in these environments (erratic humidity) results in oxidation. So as he said –“What are we to do?” There is only one thing left to us to do the unthinkable and use livestock to mimic nature of old. The issue of methane is a distraction. Anything that breaks down dead vegetation biologically emits methane and active soil micro-life plays a major role in breaking down methane. Because people find difficulty in grapsing the scale Savory is talking about he sometimes uses water to illustrate but did not have time in his TED talk. For example, the State of New Mexico is desertifying very seriously as is much of the Western US. The State has a very large dam that can hold 2.5 million cubic meters of water. If only 25mm (1 inch) of the available rainfall is made more effective as Savory showed is easy to do using livestock (but nothing else known to us) over the state this equals every year more than 3,000 dams the size of Elephant Butte. And because rainfall becoming more effective is cumulative year on year the result would astound us accustomed as we are to a desertifying world of our own making.