Colin Gordon

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Colin Gordon
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
Hi Kevin, I'm mostly referencing the work of Dr Christine Jones of "the Australian outfit "Amazing Carbon", including this article - http://fromthesoilup.com.au/news/438-liquid-carbon-pathway-unrecognised Just to let you know, I come from a permaculture background, as I suspect you do as well and completely agree with you. Savory style management is very different to a conventional pasture based method of management. Have a look at Mark Shepard's work on Restoration Agriculture that he's pioneering on New Forest Farm.
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Colin Gordon
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
A very, very good question Tuur. As far as I'm aware this TED talk could be the biggest platform for this idea. I hope that this will be a catalyst for more people to demand that this is widely adopted by livestock owners all over the world. The problem is getting livestock owners, who traditionally are very conservative about implementing new practices, to take on this approach. If it's possible for the TED community to start a campaign to lobby for governments and local authorities to offer training to farmers on how to go about implementing this, that in my opinion would be the best thing to best strategy. Savory has a book called "Holistic Management Handbook" which gives comprehensive instruction on exactly how to do this in practice. It also deals with the decision making processes and shows how to make this system financially rewarding. TED needs to organize a campaign to get the UN to offer training in Holistic Management to livestock owners and landowners all over the world.
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Colin Gordon
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
Hi Kevin, When it comes to carbon sequestration and carbon capture, grasses are actually incredibly more effective than trees, which are actually rather inefficient at carbon capture by comparison. The soil is by far the biggest carbon sink in the world. Grasses have root systems which are roughly the same size as the leafs. When allowed to mature you get very large root systems, which die back when the grass is eaten. This die back captures huge amounts of organic matter in the soil which can very quickly turn a poor soil into a healthy one if done successively. The roots also get bigger and deeper as they are able to penetrate further into the ground. You can literally build soil from the ground down, transforming subsoil to topsoil.
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Colin Gordon
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
As well as being the biggest carbon sink in the world, the soil is also the best thing at retaining water on the land. On a healthy soil, the rain that lands on it will slowly sink through it eventually recharging the groundwater table. Allan's method is the best and quickest way to rebuild topsoil and in doing so, stabilizing water supplies. This has huge implications for both water supply and als o the prevention of flooding, etc.
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Colin Gordon
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
There is a huge difference between the impact of methane produced by livestock raised in feedlots and those raised on grasslands. Most of the negative publicity surrounding cows regarding methane is using feedlot cattle as their source. Firstly, cattle are not designed to eat corn and grains and they have trouble digesting it properly, which leads to high methane and numerous other problems. Secondly, the methane produced by cattle raised on pasture is more or less cancelled out by Methanotrophs a type of prokaryotes which live in the pasture and metabolize methane as their only source of energy and carbon.
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Colin Gordon
Posted over 1 year ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
There are hundreds and thousands of people all over the world applying Allan's ideas to varying degrees. Allan is one of Joel Salatin's biggest influences. The idea of using more livestock is counter to the usual green rhetoric which is one of the main reason's I suspect that this idea hasn't been readily accepted. Although trees and forests have huge amounts of benefits, in terms of carbon capture and carbon sequestration grasslands and grasses are infinitely more effective at this job. Darren Doherty explains this reasonably well here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-xqxDYcPJ4 When grasses are allowed to grow to maturity they have huge root structures which go very deep into the soil. When eaten, these roots die back and leave an incredible amount of organic matter captured in the soil. If done continuously the roots are able to get down deeper and deeper and in the process transforming subsoils into topsoils, literally building soils from the ground down. It is easily the simplest and quickest way to build soil and if all the worlds grasslands where able to increase their soils by just 2% we'd be back to pre-industrial levels of carbon in the atmosphere. If widely adopted this could happen in less than a decade.