Scott Reil

Someone is shy

Scott hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

Noface
Scott Reil
Posted over 2 years ago
John Kasaona: How poachers became caretakers
Hey Maddie I have changed my food intake alot over the past year, going vegan, and then slowly adding back animal proteins; first seafood and most recently red meat in a limited manner. Two things changed my mind; Alan Savory's TED talk on desertification, and Tovar Cerulli's amazing book, The Mindful Carnivore. I too have found most hunters to be respectful of land and animal in a way I do not often see from those who make snap judgements from afar on what is best for animal and habitat (see Mike Rowe's TED talk to get just what I am talking about there). Bringing the hunters into the fold, indeed, making them caretakers for the wildlife they used to predate upon, is inspired and thoughtful change. Who else understands the life and death themes of the wilds better than those who took to destroying them to sustain their own lives, and those of their families? Who will become a more solid and evangelical convert than the man who has been shown a better way and has bettered his own life through it? Most importantly, and as Tovar's book points out, who are we to think that because we stop eating meat, we are no longer a part and parcel of killing animals? Killing insects and varmints is an inherent part of ANY farming. ANY food, not raised by one's own hand in a bloodless fashion, has blood on it. Because we buy it does insulate us from that, we simply pass the blame on the the one who grew the food. I think the most important thing is to be mindful and realistic about what you are eating, because in the end, it is about nutrition, both body and soul. I applaud your attack on mindless killing, but are you mindful of the animals killed to get you tofu (deer LOVE soybeans!)? Your distance from your food insulates you from that reality. Know your food from start to finish, and eat mindfully. True food justice, indeed all justice, begins with mindfullness. Our initial perceptions may be correct or not, but true mindfulness will always uncover right thinking. Namast
Noface
Scott Reil
Posted over 2 years ago
Sheryl WuDunn: Our century's greatest injustice
I was once a member of the Niantic Community Church's Youth Group, the kids that collected that Heifer International money. How amazing and uplifting to see the effort recognized in such an wonderful way. But the realities remain; as WuDunn hinted at the imbalance of men and women, the two largest populations on the planet have an inate bias towards male heirs and, with the help of modern medical technology, the ability to select pregnancies to bring to term. This is hardly apolitical issue, certainly not an economic issue (as noted by the better results in femine managed loans), this is a cultural issue that happens to have socio-economic repercussions. Even that is only a part of this issue. Even here in the U.S. this issue is coming to the fore as Russian mobs bring in girls from the former Soviet republics. But sex junkets for Asian businessmen to Thailand and Cambodia, African and Asian girls sold to cover family debt, these issues remain without comment or concern in most countries. The lack of an standing ovation at the end of this talk speaks to how uncomfortable we are with this matter; it remains much as it has since Yoko Ono made her famous quote decades back. It is time to end the silence and start the healing...
Noface
Scott Reil
Posted over 2 years ago
What is it to be Fearless ?
If I might ask Trey, how old are you? I'm betting 28 or younger... ;) You are correct that I started my speaking career with a good deal of trepidation, often literally sick to my stomach with fear. I didn't let it paralyze me, i rationalized what was the worst that could happen? and I did it. The next time was a little easier, etc. etc... I STILL have the vestiges of that fear EVERY time I speak or do the radio show. Like that tail we don't use anymore, or that thumb left over in bblue whales. But not really. Those two examples are now useless, but I make my fear serve me now. What was nervous energy that was once channeled toward projectile vomitting and stammering, is still nervous energy, now channeled toward energetic presentation and the focus that fight-or-flight can give you... I lived with a snake in my house once for years; more importantly for the point, so did my wife. Not a little thing; an Eastern Black Racer all of six feet. It was an old farmhouse with a cobbled foundation that had seen better decades, and anything and everything could get in. Becky fears snakes in a BIG way, but I convinced her he was doing more good than bad. She got to a point where she would sit on our back porch with the morning coffee with our "pet", shivering with fear, but getting to know our neighbor so chance encounters would not stop her heart. For years this went on. Then the handy man (we were renting the house) came out of the basement one day crowing, "look what I killed!" I knew before I rounded the corner who it was, and the handyman was stunned that I showered him with a lecture rather than praise. Sure enough, within a month, that old famhouse was literally overrun with rodents, from an army of field mice to some actual rats. We moved the next month... Courage is not a lack of fear; courage is fearing and still doing. My wife is a brave soul, who happens to be scared of snakes, but that does not define her. She is more than her fears, but less without them..
Noface
Scott Reil
Posted over 2 years ago
Is capitalism sustainable?
Wayne, I think you are sugar coating it. Communism is when the government owns the business, the capitalism we currently practice is when the businesses own the government. Period. Does DepAg work for people or companies? 90% of AMericans want GMO labelling, but Dep Ag and FDA are fighting it tooth and nail. Why? Because SecAg VIlsack is so in bed with Monsanto they should probably just get married already. The food industry doesn't want it, people do, and who does the government support? We just fought a war to destabilize the world's second largest oil reserve, thereby the whole market driving up prices. WHat do we think is gonna happen when we elect the grandchild of Standard Oil's founder, and make the key shareholder in Halliburton his VP? The Banana Wars at the turn of the century, any number of dictators along the way... why does Iran hate us so? Because we upset a popularly elected leader with a coup by a CIA backed dictator, who then tortured and repressed the same religious leaders that are there today. And all at the behest of the oil companies, who didn't want their fields nationalized. Officially Ken, I believe we need a dictator to meet the dictionary definition of Fascism; don't think we have a name for yet ,when it is corporate oligarchy masquerading as democracy... but the end results are the same, right?
Noface
Scott Reil
Posted over 2 years ago
What contribution does mythology make towards the improvement of society?
I need to ask another question first. Is religion mythology? I believe it is... Religion inculcates an iherent bias towards mythology as the sole arbiter of ethical thinking. Mythology as a simple analog for ethical thinking is fine, but the problem is that the analogy bnecconfused as reality by a majority of the world, with horrible side effects of seperating people far more than it brings them together. I do not believe the modern mythologies of religion do us any great service in the spread of morality; pedophile priests and suicide bombers of the world suggest otherwise. As we have seen on the TED stage, no religion provides a moral leg up over the others; the tales of compassion and ethical bevior range across race and creed; even animals show ethical behaviors we once relegated to only the "saved" among us. As stories, mythology, and indeed any religion can inform and enlighten. I am reminded of Thomas Jefferson's book, "The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth", where he held Jesus up as a life with examples we should all follow. Yet Jefferson was never a Christian; in a reply to a friend who asked, knowing Jefferson's atheism, what his beliefs were, Thomas replied "I am, sir, an Epicurean", referring to Epicurus' famous remark "What need have we of the gods, now that we have science?" Yet he found value in the mythologies passed down by his forbearers, enough so to write a book. Notice though, he goes no further than Jesus' life; he was not proselytizing, but offering example and analogy, not doctrine. It is in the transformation of parable to doctrine that the damage is done, that men insinuate their own thoughts into the "teachings" of their mythologies. Fatwahs from mullahs, Fred Phelps and his family, the Crusades; none of these memes has a base in the books they profess to worship.A modern world, as even Epicurus knew a millenia ago, has no need for these mythologies besides the stories they tell, beyond that lies harm
Noface
Scott Reil
Posted over 2 years ago
Hans Rosling: The magic washing machine
Hans is THE TED rockstar. Funny as we have some actual rockstars, but given a choice between Bono and Hans, I will go Hans every time (until he sings, and then I will go right back to Bono...)
Noface
Scott Reil
Posted over 2 years ago
Hans Rosling: Global population growth, box by box
Ummm yeah Jaden; YOU live there then... If we are talking about enough room for hunter gatherers, there is room for about 2 million people on Earth. But who picks? So that's out... On the opposite end of the spectrum, the U.S., with 5% of world population, uses 25% of the world's resources. This IS the "democracy" we have been exporting for decades, and this IS where we are headed; consumerism at U.S. levels. We are currently using an Earth AND A HALF worth of resources worldwide, when sustainability of the resources are accounted for, and we are going to have A LOT more people that want to attain American levels of use. Despite the fact that this is exactly where we are going as we speak, this is out as well, for the obvious reasons... It is interesting you chose L.A., Jaiden, for this is where the most damage is getting done right now. The more we export our culture, the more we steamroll sustainable native cultures and replace them with Coke and Nikes and the Die Hard franchise, the worse this issue becomes for everyone... and Hollywierd exports our shop-till-you-drop meme like nothing else out there... Hans says we need to pick up that bottom 2 billion in a hurry, and I agree, but I think we need to start scaling down that top 2 billion as well. As long as rampant consumerism is the apex of human desire (well, that, Selma Hayek and Halle Berry, but I don't blame the ladies), we are doomed as a race. When the good that you do and your value to society as a global whole becomes more important than the cut of your clothes or the car you drive, or even your bank account, then we have a fighting chance, but it will still be a fight... And based on his value to society and the good he is doing, I proclaim Hans Rosling a global treasure of vast wealth....
Noface
Scott Reil
Posted over 2 years ago
Danny Hillis: The Internet could crash. We need a Plan B
Michael, I would tell you that the sub-text I heard underlying Dan's talk was this... There is a potential of the Internet shutting down completely, be it bugs or deliberate attack... There is NO plan in place for that eventuality... SO as an individual user, you can stare at a blank screen... this is a system issue, not an interface issue... Your IP can stare at their blank screen... Everyone that is NOT a systems engineer can stare at their blank screens... System engineers can stare at screens that aren't connected and try any number of possibilities that may or may not work, but without a roadmap, these sysadmins will be largely uncoordinated and unlikely to yield netwide results... seems the fix is that roadmap... I'm a layperson, not a techno geek at all, but that's what I got. I put this to the geeks to see if I have attained any enlightenment on the subject...