Robbie Harrison

Bristol, United Kingdom

About Robbie

Areas of Expertise

Business Enterprise, Nutrition & Health, Exercise,

Comments & conversations

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Robbie Harrison
Posted over 1 year ago
Is capitalism sustainable?
I just like to give my support on your points. Automation (which is clearly viable) could solve so many problems in the world. The problem is that for companies to invest and setup a system it would be take too long to see a significant return, blinded by short term gain in my eyes. Personally, like many things, I believe it falls down to values, a new enterprise is a reflection on a persons personality. The sooner people realise that improvement from the bottom up will improve life for all then w'll be a step closer. Just means a shift in education and training towards other industries is needed. For example, an investment in renewable energy sources will allow a significant percentage contribution to the demand of the country; all that needs to be paid for is the maintenance. The decrease in energy costs for heating and lighting will increase disposable income for households as the dependency on oil based energy decreases, allowing them to invest in other areas.
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Robbie Harrison
Posted over 1 year ago
How will travel change local places in the future?
To begin with, it would have to be accepted that people living in different sized settlements have expectations on the way life there; probably why they wanted to live there in the first place. Trying to tackle the most major issue of large scale tourism encroaching on local, untouched areas is tricky. The exploitation comes from businesses with an interest in exploiting a profit making opportunity which governments are unlikely to turn down in the current economical environment. Lets take a hotel chain as an example. A reasonably untouched area is found and the company wish to build a hotel, visitors expect the area to adapt to them i.e. ATM's, Wireless e.t.c. This is where the balancing trick comes in, a hotel needs to change its identity to becoming a Cultural Gateway; offering modern services but local knowledge. Money spent around the local area acts as investment to local businesses and people for their own organic growth and improvement rather than allowing larger companies and chains to invest directly, otherwise profits are sent off to headquarters in a large city and probably sent off-shore. This strategy would restrict exploitation as long as governments are prepared for an exclusive local tax system. I've always believed in the phrase 'think local, act global'. Perhaps an approach of registration? If you can't prove you live within the area then a certain extra percentage is can be charged on a product/service. I'd love to articulate my ideas better, but its difficult over an open internet discussion. Please ask anymore specific questions you like
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Robbie Harrison
Posted over 1 year ago
Advertising a healthy diet the same way that junk food companies advertise to the public in subversive ways.
I can't say I ever heard of that paper but would be interested in seeing it, another profit-driven venture I'd imagine! I wonder whether the drive to make things more addictive is the industries way to combat wealth of knowledge and awareness around the problems their products and services incur? If only they had the mind to embrace change, surely long-term investment in healthier products will drive a transition which ultimately would retain profit. If a proposed tax on soft drinks (which is currently being considered) was used to force improvements in nutritional content with the tax being lifted when a product eventually hit more acceptable levels. Agreed we are a democratic system, but in UK voting, there's such a low level because no one believes anything they do will make a difference; there seems to be a systemic problem of hidden agendas even if rules, regulations and documentation are meant to be transparent
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Robbie Harrison
Posted over 1 year ago
Advertising a healthy diet the same way that junk food companies advertise to the public in subversive ways.
Although I'd fully endorse this idea, the problem is that the opposition have a major advantage, refined sugar. Sugar accounts for the main gains in fat, a variety of diseases, poor blood sugar and the worst one of them all... addictiveness; more addictive as some illegal drugs. So the fight needs to come from both fronts: education from a young age in both how to cook and what ingredients do what, as well as the fight from companies to push products that are evolutionally more suitable for the human being (not advocating the paleo diet for everyone), also legal and political pressure (e.g. government advertising, possible taxes (although this is a tricky area to implement))
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Robbie Harrison
Posted over 1 year ago
How will travel change local places in the future?
Everywhere is local to someone, somewhere. Typical 'Local' places are ones that develop over time and result in their own characteristics, customs, expectations and perceptions . I believe that although some places currently remain reasonably uninfluenced they will eventually evolve to some degree from the external world. But its a question how this happens, a local community/area should 'play to its strengths' and core values, no person nor place can have everything. By letting diversity grow and global forces supporting them in the correct way is essential. 'Local' in a sense could therefore be a closed system with the end-user in mind, the indigenous people. Exploration and travel therefore needs become something of a respected experience. Major cities/towns on the most part could be anywhere and provide a reasonably 'tame' experience or taster, typically a 'tourist' view. A 'balance' can be achieved when businesses and governments know when not to make 'local' areas too vulnerable to external influences and to listen to the people, are they prepared to accept visitors and share their 'local' life.
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Robbie Harrison
Posted over 1 year ago
"Why Can't We Solve Big Problems?"
I'd take make this view with a broad brush. We can solve big problems with our technology but I believe the problem lies in the values and the heart of how we define business and ourselves, 'the pursuit of profit'. By definition a business cannot exist without supporting itself (unless with subsidisation from government, another issue). The aim is to produce a monetary reward and this is seen as success. But wait, aren't we intelligent and open enough by now to realise 'success' should be something that increases quality of life and happiness? Betterment for all? If by the parameters that we measure success by are changed, then perhaps the chances for collaboration and problem solving can increase. Picking up on Allan's point (below) he is quite right, there is "a thick fog of technology, administrative procedures, lawsuits, health and safety legislation and politics" that also stand in out way.