Lincoln Solomon

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Lincoln Solomon
Posted over 1 year ago
Why, or more importantly, how, did sexual reproduction of life forms evolve?
If i may sum up so far: Essentially there are theories (let's assume evolutionary) about two aspects of sexual; reproduction: One to do with why it should be advantageous (introducing recombination, which is assumed to be a good thing ...), the other as to its origin, which is murkier water altogether. KPs timeline " gene transfer -> multicellular reproduction with gene transfer -> separate sexes" looks logical, but those arrows '->" need some mechanistic explaination. This is what I want to know about, from an evolutionary point of view. Talk to me.
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Lincoln Solomon
Posted over 1 year ago
Why, or more importantly, how, did sexual reproduction of life forms evolve?
So if multicellular organisms did not decide on sexual reproduction, what did it for them? What laid down the rule that "if thou art an organism composed of two or more cells thou shalt not clone, but look for one such as yourself, but of opposite gender, and with him / her divide your genome in exactly half and combine it with his / her half and from that combination give rise to another like you ... "
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Lincoln Solomon
Posted over 1 year ago
Why, or more importantly, how, did sexual reproduction of life forms evolve?
OK so we have some reasons why sexual reproduction is advantageous from an evolutionary viewpoint: viz. getting DNA into the next generation of organisms, but HOW did nature "decide" on this method of reproduction. What were the (postulated) mechanics? Which organisms stumbled onto this in the first place, and what were the possible push factors for this to happen?
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Lincoln Solomon
Posted over 1 year ago
Why, or more importantly, how, did sexual reproduction of life forms evolve?
@ KP: So HOW did mutlicellular organisms "decide" on sexual reproduction. This means that some organs had to develop the ability to produce half the genome needed to match half the genome of the female of the species (where did she come from?) and to develop a transfer mechanism (sometimes even using third parties like bees and butterflies) so that the gene transfer and matching is just right to combine and form a new organism of the same species ... Unicellular organisms do transfer genes, but it seems that E.coli now is still E.coli from 50 yrs ago, despite having acquired many genes that code for antibiotic resistance ...