Daniel Prieto

Lecturer, Music and Design Schools, Universidad de los Andes
Bogotá D.c., Colombia

About Daniel

Bio

Born in 1978 in Bogotá, Colombia, Daniel Prieto is an electroacoustic composer, improviser, performer, teacher and sound designer.

His catalog contains tape music, mixed music and multimedia works that have been heard in several spaces in Colombia as well as abroad. He has perfomed live electronic music with the ensemble 'Ramalazo', mostly in spaces different than music halls, such as art galleries, works with the '3x3' ensemble, dedicated to free improvisation, and designer-singer Nobara Hayakawa. His collaborations with other artists include music for the dancer and choreographer Sandrine Legendre and sound design and interactivity programming in Max-MSP and Pd for the colombian artist Clemencia Echeverri.

He has lectured in various academic and independent spaces, such as Dorkbot conferences, the Electrical engineering and computer science schools in the Universidad de Los Andes and the Beta music+technology cycle, in Liverpool, UK.

Currently, he works as a lecturer in the fieds of in the music technology and sound design, in the music and design schools in the Universidad de Los Andes, in Bogotá, Colombia, and is an active performer in the local experimental music scene.

Languages

English, French, Spanish

I'm passionate about

Education, soundscape design, computers, open source, sound, music, improvisation

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

25124
Daniel Prieto
Posted almost 2 years ago
Robert Neuwirth: The hidden world of shadow cities
Although he's got some points, this extreme and patronizing exotization of the poverty legitimates the miserable conditions in which people in slums (or 'cities of the future') lives, and ignores –or naturalizes– the public policy underlying the perpetuation of poverty. Is this a first-world or educated middle-class disease? I've seen discourses like that in Colombia, claiming that life in the most abject slums is just 'free and simple'. Who benefits with the 'softening' of the visions of poverty?
25124
Daniel Prieto
Posted almost 3 years ago
"Morality" is an abused term/concept. Can you suggest a solid definition?
I talk about historical and social contexts different that the one in we live, we share a greater sphere called by some 'West', that has developed historically, just as -say- the middle ages, or an uncontacted contemporary tribe in the amazon, or the future, which we ignore. In any of these contexts, society shapes and validates certain types of knowledge that constitute a certain way to build the truth, to render something so humane, and thus artificial, into nature. If you search for 'universals' in these contexts your results will be different. I believe as well in democracy, and it's my preferred moral compass, or prime structure, but I don't think it's natural or universal. I proselite about it, I judge from its parameters, but I must recognise that it's artificial.
25124
Daniel Prieto
Posted almost 3 years ago
"Morality" is an abused term/concept. Can you suggest a solid definition?
Morality is to act according a certain arbitrary subset of a 'system of actions', in which some are chosen as virtue, thus given more value, instead of others, which are devaluated and become vices. Morality can be found in aesthetical taste, sex, communication, food preparing and hygiene, or attitude towards others or political preferences, because they respond to a set of arbitrary values that become paradigmatic and –in a certain way– indisputable. Because of its arbitrary nature, morality is not universal, but a definition like this can be transposed to many contexts. The arbitrary choice of values comes from human needs, but human needs vary according to the environment, physical (productive) and cultural (ideological). This needs arise from the need of fulfilling of a collective or cultural project, a 'munis', that ultimately leads to some final end, a 'telos', but –again– the ends and means depend on culture. The fulfillment of one's role in the 'munis' leads one to 'be more', 'be better', more moral. Also, the values that are considered 'moral' change through time, a couple of hundred years ago an enlightened moralist would think that basic human needs for a colonist in South America would be different for the peasant, for the slave and for the indian, and he was right in his context, from his point of view, because those were the moral values of their time, and he was fulfilling his role in his social scheme. Now we could consider this moral as wicked and 'immoral', because it's not our moral system, nor thought schemes, nor economic conditions or social structures. Western thought has modeled a variety of ways to looking at values, from Plato, to St. Agustine to Derrida and beyond, but they are not unique, nor 'naturally true'. I tend to agree that when one discusses about moral things as natural, given, or axiomatic in any way, one has a non natural interest, a will to be accomplished though others, a will to exercise power.
25124
Daniel Prieto
Posted almost 4 years ago
Julian Treasure: Shh! Sound health in 8 steps
According to the 'Handbook for acoustic ecology', Soundscapes are environments of sound in the way they are perceived by the individual and the society, and the word 'soundscape' might refer to an actual environment of sound as well as an artificial construct, such as a recorded song, or an audio montage. There is the phisical aspect of the soundscape, the sound pressure, the spectral content of it; but the emphasis is placed in the perceptual aspect, or how does it makes sense to you, how does it affects your sonic behaviour, listening or producing sound, and your health, not only aural (of your ears) but of the whole body and psychological. The book that Mr. Treasure recommends in another post (The Tuning of the World) is a seminal work, to the soundscape studies, but you can also find out in the Handbook (http://www.sfu.ca/sonic-studio/handbook/index.html) I mentioned, and the Soundscape Journal from the University of Oregon (http://interact.uoregon.edu/medialit/wfae/journal/)