Brock Hardwood

South Pole, Antarctica

About Brock

Bio

I'm a penguin herder... I write this to illustrate to Robert just how meaningless a bio can be! Do you get the point now, Robert?

Comments & conversations

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Brock Hardwood
Posted almost 2 years ago
We of the industrialised countries have a tremendous amount to gain from the tribal peoples of the world, concerning problems of our era.
If tribal communities have so much to offer, why don't they have indoor plumbing? Sure, human life is valuable, and stagnant cultures can certainly be interesting, but if we want to solve the problems concerning our era, we are best served by looking within our own civilization. Our society produces real healthcare, advanced agriculture techniques, efficient communication mediums, education, durable housing, roads, bridges, mass transit, and the list goes on and on.
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Brock Hardwood
Posted almost 2 years ago
Education "vouchers" solve the fiscal crisis, and also lead to economic recovery?
"A comment about the Poor and having to find there way to school. If there are vouchers and money to be made, charter schools will open in areas near them" How are the poor going to come up with the remaining $12,000 per year per child for a private school, given that the average private school costs $20K per year, and the really good ones can cost as much as $40K per year? Public schools cost a fraction of that cost with similar results. The ONLY thing that has been shown to have a real impact on academic success is parental involvement. That can happen with either choice, public or private. You guys talk about 'parental choice', yet conveniently forget that 'parental RESPONSIBILITY' has a much greater impact. http://www.dailyfinance.com/2011/06/22/private-school-tuition-hits-the-stratosphere-40-000-per-year/ It's pretty tough for for-profit companies to compete with not-for-profit organizations when both can implement the same innovations.
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Brock Hardwood
Posted almost 2 years ago
What are we to do with "Comment Trolls" here at TED?
Anytime there is a paycheck or profit involved, there is a potential for fraud and corruption, but that doesn't mean that everyone that earns a paycheck or makes a profit is corrupt. These articles actually point out what is great about science. Unlike matters of unquestioning faith, science is a process that doesn't rely on blind acceptance or appeals to authority. It demands objective data and rigorously defined and reproducible experiments. This is why falsified research gets exposed in the first place.
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Brock Hardwood
Posted almost 2 years ago
Education "vouchers" solve the fiscal crisis, and also lead to economic recovery?
Public funds for education need to purchase a standardized curriculum. If a religious private school wants to add to that curriculum, that is fine, but they can't take away from what the tax payers expect. As long as that school teaches what the government expects them to teach (math, science, reading, writing, history, etc) they are more than welcome to teach bible studies, underwater basket weaving, etc. I am not apposed to parents choosing a religious education on top of the standard curriculum expected and payed for by the government, as long as the vouchers do not exceed the cost of a public education.
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Brock Hardwood
Posted almost 2 years ago
Education "vouchers" solve the fiscal crisis, and also lead to economic recovery?
"We", is the voter. Democracy only functions when the losing side acknowledges that they lost. 'We' includes those that disagree. Consider the question of why you think our education is failing. What standard are you measuring that to? Notice that once you ask that question of yourself, you are immediately forced to deal with the fact that you have a standard for education that must be objective. So what is that standard? Pay close attention to this point: If you don't have an expectation for what education is, you can not claim it is either succeeding or failing, or that one system is better or worse than the other at providing it.
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Brock Hardwood
Posted almost 2 years ago
Education "vouchers" solve the fiscal crisis, and also lead to economic recovery?
I have no bias towards any school that teaches a standardized curriculum. If a religious school wants to add to that curriculum something else, to include bible studies, that is fine as long as the tax payers are getting the education that THEY paid for, and that includes real science. "Let's not forget that Newton was a believer, big bang theory was introduced by Georges Lemaitre, a catholic priest, and genetics was founded by Gregor Mendel, a monk." True, and they would all agree that those subjects should be apart of a standardized curriculum. Newton, as well as Galileo, would obviously support the teaching of the scientific method and advanced mathematics. Even more, the Catholic church, along with many other denominations of Christianity, are perfectly fine with the teaching of Evolutionary theory (the grand unifying theory of biology and medicine).
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Brock Hardwood
Posted almost 2 years ago
Education "vouchers" solve the fiscal crisis, and also lead to economic recovery?
You not understanding how it is a systemic funding of religion, no mater how convoluted the process is, isn't an argument. Giving people money "for education" requires the government to define what constitutes education. Otherwise, it could be used for buying a car. I am not apposed to parents choosing a religious education on top of the standard curriculum expected and payed for by the government, as long as the vouchers do not exceed the cost of a public education.