Kamran Kamal

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Kamran Kamal
Posted over 1 year ago
Suzana Herculano-Houzel: What is so special about the human brain?
A panda bear spends all the time eating. This is mainly because bamboo isn't very nutricious. The world in which we lived thousands of years ago may have contained many of the foods that we have today, but many of those foods could have been more numerous and nutricious back then. Cooking food may have played its part to some extent but too many other factors that had an influence on our development need to be considered as well. Nice talk, but an over simplification of a process that I think we need to look at again with fresh eyes.
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Kamran Kamal
Posted over 1 year ago
Paul Piff: Does money make you mean?
I have to question Bill Gates's sincerity when making his quote shown in this video because he was the one who was against writing and distributing programs freely while many of his competitors (at the time) were for this idea. Great talk, nice experiments that showed some interesting observations.
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Kamran Kamal
Posted over 1 year ago
Geraldine Hamilton: Body parts on a chip
This invention sounds great, and I like its ability to emulate a cell's surroundings, however we also need to think about the surroundings that this technology will enter upon if/when it's implimented into the medical research community. A lot of research papers published by pharaceutical companies are filled with successful experiments and tend to neglect unsuccessful ones thus biasing a drug's ability to do its job, and in some cases may promote a bad drug for the company's financial benefit. I would personally not want my cells to be copied, owned or experiemented upon whilst pharaceutical companies have more incentive to make money than cure disease. I do however still believe that Geraldine has a great invention, and hope that it's not implimented into a system that will promote its use for destructive purposes.
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Kamran Kamal
Posted over 1 year ago
Enrique PeƱalosa: Why buses represent democracy in action
According to free market forces (which is a democratic idea), it can be seen in most cities that when offered a choice most people would choose a motor vehicle to get around in. This may not be fair as explained by Enrique Penalosa in this talk because the motorist and their roads in particular take up a larger part of the space between buildings than walkways, bus lanes and bicycle lanes. However, motorists do pay a road tax that helps maintain the roads that they use. This is not an offer that can be made for pedestrians as this would translate into a tax for all citizens regardless of their personal choice of transportation. I believe that if Enrique wishes to balance the inequality in road space use between cars and other forms of transport, then he must also address the inequality between the taxes that motorists pay and the lack of taxes that all pedestrians deserve and demand. As this is an extremely difficult task, I would like to end this comment by wishing Enrique the best of luck with this endevour.
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Kamran Kamal
Posted over 1 year ago
Robin Nagle: What I discovered in New York City trash
I appreciate the sentiment that Robin Nagle is making with regard to the sanitation industry, however I did feel a slight edge of ingenuinity creeping in, for example to thank sanitation workers for the job that they do without thanking everyone else for the jobs that they do implies that their job is inferior to others. I would liken this kind of action to getting on the bus and having a younger person stand up to allow me to use their seat. This kind action has insulting implications by insinuating that I am old. I would rather stand than be insulted in this way. I also remember her describing the sanitation industry as "inhumane" and started to wonder who she really thinks she is. I live in Taiwan and here everybody throws their own garbage into the garbage truck giving us all an opportunity to meet our neighbours and catch up on some local gossip.
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Kamran Kamal
Posted over 2 years ago
Is the total eradication of mosquitoes a true solution?
Yes, I am also worried about the massive ecological side effects that the extinction of a species will typically involve. If this mosquito that is responsible for so many deaths around the world were to become extinct our already rapidly growing human population would grow even faster than it already is, and this will have massive negative effects on our future generation's quality of life. Please don't mistake me when I say this, because I would not like anyone that I know to contract a fatal disease because they didn't apply enough deet. But the Earth does need to have a control mechanism on the rate of human population growth, otherwise it will be left to our politicians who will probably decide on something deeply unethical that resembles ethnic cleansing. Is the science community at least not already convinced that everything in nature works in balance with one another, and an extinction of any species would destabilize the whole ecosystem? For example, one of David Attenborough's documentaries focused on a fungus that spreads relative to the size of a population of ants in the Amazon Rain Forest. When the population of ants went up, the chances of the ants getting this fungus that killed them increased and so reduced their population until the chance of them getting the fungus went down. I think that we as humans should be humble enough to accept our place in this eco-system and be respectful enough to undergo hardship for the sake of a more stable, heathlier and happier Earth. Hadyn Parry, just because we can do it, doesn't mean we should.