Abbad Diraneyya

Wikipedia
Amman, Jordan

About Abbad

Bio

High school student. Blogger and activist in open source movement. Wikipedian since 2009 and administrator on Arabic Wikipedia version. Currently an ambassador of Wikipedia in Jordan, and working on co-organizing Wiki Loves Monuments wiki-photography competition in Syria and Jordan.

Languages

Arabic, English

Talk to me about

Wikipedia, Open-source movement, Free knowledge and education, Environment, Astronomy

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

280091
Abbad Diraneyya
Posted almost 2 years ago
Syria: what should we do about the media?
It's hard to summarize it in few words here. The core perspective of the conflict viewed by the media is wrong, and many, if not the vast majority, are highly influenced by it. For example (talking about what other countries are seeking), on the contrary of the common thought, the fighters in Syria aren't supported by the west. Actually, the western governments supports only a plenty of groups which has been considered as west-loyal, they counts for few dozens out of hundreds/thousands of armed groups currently in the country. This's not for free, because there's nothing out there for free; what happens is that someone from a western intelligence comes to the gang's leader, he offers him money, weapons, and whatever he may wish, however, he must accept his group to work under a "military union", which would be totally lead by the west. The majority will refuse. When this happens, and when the west finds a group as unlikely to be loyal even if it accepted the offer, then they will "dry the sources". This term means that someone from the FBI or some western intelligence will go to the black market and buy massively all available weapons, so that the rebels have no source for supplies or ammo, and they start to lose their territories to the government or the west-loyal groups. With this manner, the western governments are working on killing the actually revolution, while the media is spreading to the people the totally untrue picture of; The West vs. Syrian regime.
280091
Abbad Diraneyya
Posted almost 2 years ago
Syria: what should we do about the media?
Thanks Keith. I've indeed summarized my view in former responses; I don't see it as a war, but as a revolution driven by the people. It got violent, and this caused a lot of problems, but it's still driven by the will of the Syrians. There's still a lot of details to go through, and a lot of thing to say about the fake picture given by the media in many ways. Even though I am happy that people here are intelligent and thinks first about anything they hear before believing it, even if it's my opinions. This where the problem started in the first place.
280091
Abbad Diraneyya
Posted almost 2 years ago
Syria: what should we do about the media?
We all realize this very well, because of the past experiences in the region and other countries (like Afghanistan, which we know closely since many Arabs fought there in the 1980s). Actually, the peaceful protests versus armed fighting was one of the most controversial issues inside Syria for around a year after the beginning of the event (another thing the media would never mention). Some people insisted to keep it peaceful, because they feared such risks which the weapons could bring, however, the size of support for the armed resistance started to drop up rapidly with time, as it's really not easy to convince people on keeping peaceful when they are shot with guns everytime they scream with their demands.
280091
Abbad Diraneyya
Posted almost 2 years ago
Syria: what should we do about the media?
I think the right things are always hard and challangable; this is just how the world is like. If it were easy and safe, then the world should have been a much better place, but it is not. It's then our duty to work on changing this as much as we can, and possibly, we will be one day "the victor"!
280091
Abbad Diraneyya
Posted almost 2 years ago
Syria: what should we do about the media?
Thank you, may I should watch that talk. However, the problem in Syria maybe not exactly about peace. I know you feel about it like that because of the news reports or something like that, but this's not the situation, it's just another part of the media problem! The Mayors are only criminals appointed by the intelligence to maintain the control of the government, even if through detention, torture, and killing. The "terrorists" picture of the fighters is totally untrue; fighters are normal Syrians who decided to fight against the massive security & army attacks (several months after peaceful demonstrations demanding the overthrow of a 50-years old regime). So, the situation is actually more like a people uprising/revolution rather than the chaotic conflict given by the media, the problem isn't in the war, it's in the government.
280091
Abbad Diraneyya
Posted almost 2 years ago
Syria: what should we do about the media?
Thanks. I am doing this since it started, and I will try to keep doing the best I can. Maybe it's not easy to summarize a situation like this in few words. My personal view always was, and will be, that it's simply a people's revolution. In the first place, the events in Syria were peaceful protests inspired by the Arab spring revolutions that broke in early 2011, overthrowing four political regimes in the region until now. The protests then developed into riots, general strikes, and finally armed fighting. Although there's now few secondary factions in the conflict, like the Kurds, the essential situation is still defined by people inside Syria as a revolution against the government. There's indeed different views about this, and there's still some people inside Syria who supports the government, but the clear majority have this view; I guess this is the case of every revolution.
280091
Abbad Diraneyya
Posted almost 2 years ago
Syria: what should we do about the media?
Well, I wouldn't call it a civil war because, simply, it's not! All of this started in march 2011 as part of the Arab Spring wave in the region. It was inspired in the first place by the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions, after successfully overthrowing two long-standing Arab regimes. At the beginning, it was peaceful protests against the government, then the violence broke out. However, the critical point still the same; it's driven by the people, to achieve the will of the people. On the contrary of the "terrorists" picture given by the media, the fighters in Syria are actually normal people who carried weapons to defend their homes from the security and army forces attacks. A true naming of this situation would be "violent revolution" that used to be peaceful (does that differ much from the "French revolution" for example?), however, the birth of "civil war" title was accompained with a whole campaign to demonstrate what's happening as a chaotic conflict between multiple factions, which is untrue. I realize that people doesn't care, this seems as a human nature; if even the people living just few kilometers behind the Syrian border are quite apathetic, it's not expected from those living on the other side of the earth to have much concern. Still, I am just more comfortable when they are getting the real picture, because it's indeed hard to see terrible horrors that none in the rest of the world is even hearing about (well, what the media tells on this regard is totally NOTHING).